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How often should I restart WHS? RRS feed

  • Question

  •  

    I recently constructed a new machine for WHS use.  I have to say, WHS is pretty slick and very easy to use.  Things are working great!

     

    One question though...how often should I restart the server, and is there a way to make it restart automatically, say at 6AM every X morning.

     

    Thanks.

    Friday, November 16, 2007 3:36 PM

Answers

  • Windows Home Server should only be rebooted when absolutely necessary; for critical updates and software that requires a reboot, the addition of new hardware that requires the system be off and planned shutdowns. If you intend to shut down your home server, the best time to do so is when the Balancing Storage message is not displayed on the console when logged into the server via remote desktop.
    Sunday, November 18, 2007 10:59 PM

All replies

  •  thermodynamics wrote:
    I recently constructed a new machine for WHS use.  I have to say, WHS is pretty slick and very easy to use.  Things are working great!

     

    One question though...how often should I restart the server, and is there a way to make it restart automatically, say at 6AM every X morning.

     

    Thanks.

     

    You should not reboot the server any more than is necessary (which, under normal operations, would only be once a month for updates).  One other warning regarding reboots:  at least for a couple other people and myself, your Shadow Copies of files that are stored in a network share that does not have Folder Duplication turned on get messed up after a reboot (can't speak for everyone though).

     

    However, if you really wanted to do it, you could create a scheduled task to run a batch file using the shutdown -r command.

    Friday, November 16, 2007 3:50 PM
    Moderator
  • Being that it's a server, you shouldn't need to restart..  Cept those updates as mentioned above..  That's why hot swappable hard drives are popular..
    Friday, November 16, 2007 4:13 PM
  • I pretty much do as everyone else said, only reboot when there are updates that require it.

     

    Friday, November 16, 2007 4:25 PM
  • I'll go one step further and say you should do everything possible to AVOID an unexpected reboot.  From my experience and from extensive reading of posts on this forum, an unexpected or ill timed reboot can result in a "database inconsistency"  error which can be impossible to recover without losing all your backups.  As stated by other posters, there is no reason to ever reboot unless required by updates.  I'd recommend a good UPS, including one for your network's router and switch(es).

    Saturday, November 17, 2007 2:03 AM
  • Sorry to disagree with the crowd, but it's a Windows product.  It tends to get a bit confused after long run periods. 

     

    I have mine set to reboot every Tuesday morning at 0300, a period of very little to no activity.  I have no "inconsistencies" or other issues, and I check my event log at least once every few days. 

     

    If you decide to reboot automatically, DON'T pick Sunday - WHS does lots of housekeeping on Sunday.

    Saturday, November 17, 2007 3:45 AM
  •  Technogeez wrote:
    Sorry to disagree with the crowd, but it's a Windows product.  It tends to get a bit confused after long run periods. 

     

    I disagree with your disagreement. Smile  Mine works great until I reboot (see below)

     

     Technogeez wrote:
    I have mine set to reboot every Tuesday morning at 0300, a period of very little to no activity.  I have no "inconsistencies" or other issues, and I check my event log at least once every few days. 

     

    If you decide to reboot automatically, DON'T pick Sunday - WHS does lots of housekeeping on Sunday.

     

    Just out of curiosity, do you have any shares without Duplication turned on?  If so, do your Shadow Copies for the files in those shares continue to work after a reboot (for example, can you copy them to your desktop after rebooting)?  Suffice it to say, mine don't....

    Saturday, November 17, 2007 4:20 AM
    Moderator
  • Just to clarify, my experience with Windows Server 2003 (Win 2K3) is different than desktop windows.

     

    If you are running a desktop version of windows, like XP or vista, then I would agree that windows seems to get "confused after long run periods."  So rebooting every once in a while is ok.

     

    My experience with a commercial installation of several hundred Win 2K3 Web servers is that they just keep on cooking, and some of those servers are running at least a month or more without a reboot.  The thing that causes the reboot is when the monthly MS patches have to be applied, and then only if we get a patch that applies to our environment (we don't patch just everything...).

     

    Since WHS is based on Win 2K3 server, I'm firmly in the "let-it-be" category...

     

    Just my 2 cents, do whatever you are more comfortable with...

     

    DDanster

     

    Saturday, November 17, 2007 4:24 AM
  • I have to say I find it quite amusing when people talk about weeks or months of uptime. How about years? I used to managed a large Netware installation and some of our servers had an uptime of almost two years and these were absolute monsters!!

     

    Now I'm an IT Manager of an institution that runs 12 Server 2003 boxes which have up times in the region of six to 8 months.

     

    I agree that a server should be left well alone to do its job and the thing about WHS is you are tempted to tinker because its YOURS not the corporate you work for! Leave the darn thing alone and don't fiddle. If it works, don't mess with it.

     

    Agree about the UPS - essential. At the very least get some form of filtering / spike / surge supression.

     

    Sit back and enjoy!

    Saturday, November 17, 2007 9:42 AM
  • We can agree to disagree.

     

    I have all my shared folders set for duplication.

     

    Our W2k3 server at work has had periodic issues, which we must then reboot to clear.  While I'll admit that the problems we've had have been related to a backup application, and not the server itself, we find that rebooting not only clears up the issue with the backups, but also speeds up user access and logoff times.  So I figure it's good maintenance to restart the system periodically.  Maybe once a week is overkill, but it hasn't caused any problems yet (and I've been doing it for a few months now).

    Sunday, November 18, 2007 7:04 PM
  • Total and utter nonsense.  I've had Windows servers running for well over a year without a reboot necessary.  A SQL server I maintain that gets heavy use hasn't been rebooted in over 7 months.

     

    Leave it alone and let it maintain itself.

    Sunday, November 18, 2007 7:10 PM
  •  Robert L. Stinnett wrote:
    Total and utter nonsense.  I've had Windows servers running for well over a year without a reboot necessary.  A SQL server I maintain that gets heavy use hasn't been rebooted in over 7 months.

     

    Leave it alone and let it maintain itself.

     

    I agree rebooting is mostly unnecessary, but you need to reboot for critical/security updates.

    Sunday, November 18, 2007 7:32 PM
    Moderator
  • Windows Home Server should only be rebooted when absolutely necessary; for critical updates and software that requires a reboot, the addition of new hardware that requires the system be off and planned shutdowns. If you intend to shut down your home server, the best time to do so is when the Balancing Storage message is not displayed on the console when logged into the server via remote desktop.
    Sunday, November 18, 2007 10:59 PM
  • I've had to re-boot a couple of times.  It seems like the console gets stuck saying "Balancing Storage".  I had that message for a few days when nothing abnormal was being backed up.  At the same time one of the computers showed that it hadn't backed up in 2 days.  After the reboot the Balancing Storage showed as balanced and the 2 missing days were listed in the backup window of the computer.

     

    Monday, November 19, 2007 6:33 PM
  •  Marc Moon wrote:
    Windows Home Server should only be rebooted when absolutely necessary; for critical updates and software that requires a reboot, the addition of new hardware that requires the system be off and planned shutdowns. If you intend to shut down your home server, the best time to do so is when the Balancing Storage message is not displayed on the console when logged into the server via remote desktop.

     

    OK, OK - I'll defer to the product team.  Although, technically, a scheduled task would be, by definition, a "planned shutdown."  But I'm splitting verbal hairs there.

     

    Listen to the expert.  Despite my own experience, I shall remove my weekly reboot and see how long she'll run without having any process confusion.

     

    Thanks for weighing in, Marc.

    Monday, November 19, 2007 10:57 PM
  • If you haven't installed a ton of desktop software, your WHS will need to be rebooted only for critical updates that require a reboot. Which is approximately monthly.
    Tuesday, November 20, 2007 4:24 AM
    Moderator