locked
Validation Fails or Invalid After BIOS Changes or Updates/Flashes/Dual Bios RRS feed

  • Question

  •  


    • Changed type Kenhomza Wednesday, June 1, 2011 11:56 AM
    • Changed type Kenhomza Wednesday, June 1, 2011 12:01 PM
    • Edited by Kenhomza Wednesday, June 1, 2011 12:01 PM
    • Changed type Darin Smith MS Wednesday, June 1, 2011 9:19 PM
    Tuesday, May 31, 2011 7:38 PM

Answers

  • "Kenhomza" wrote in message news:1024eba6-669a-404a-96e0-7fa409a53d50...
    Hi, Let me describe what I experience a little better.
    If I have a PC and I alter the BIOS via BIOS Update/Flash, or Dual BIOS Chip Motherboard Switching,
    Windows 7 Product Activation stays current and valid, but for example: after BIOS alteration if I go to Microsoft Download Center and
    Windows 7 Genuine Advantage Validation runs it fails to validate a valid retail distribution of Windows 7 SP1, then does the norm of a failed validation leads you to the Microsoft
    Purchas a Valid Copy and Windows and Reporting Fraud website, anything that uses Windows 7 Genuine Advantage Validation fails to pass validation, installation Windows Updates, Service Packs, Software.
    Even thou If I run the Windows 7 Genuine Advantage Validation Diagnostics Tool it passes.
    The only way I have been able to work around this is to call the 800 # with the PID and the HASH Code and re-Activate Windows even thou Windows say’s it’s already activated.
    It actually happened to me again last night that’s why I posted this, I updated the BIOS on a Win 7 SP1 Notebook, then I went to the Microsoft Download Center and tried to download Microsoft Virtual Machine I wanted to
    test out a Windows server setup idea before I deployed it, anyway during the Download process Windows 7 Genuine Advantage Validation failed.
    It does the same thing if I flip back and forth on other PC’s with Dual BIOS Chip Motherboards and different BIOS versions.
    “My opinion is BIOS version changes cause issues with Windows 7 Genuine Advantage Validation = Software BUG...”
    In the case of OEM installs, changing the  BIOS can invalidate a OEM_SLP Key, due to the new BIOS possibly not having the proper SLIC table present. In the case of Retail installs, this should not present a problem, as the SLIC table is irrelevant.
     
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by Kenhomza Wednesday, June 1, 2011 11:57 AM
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Wednesday, June 1, 2011 9:19 PM
    Wednesday, June 1, 2011 6:46 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • When you say Validate, in this case you actually mean Activate.

     

     When Windows is first Activated, it records the Hardware IDs of the hardware the PC is made of.  It takes those IDs and makes sort of a 'Master Hardware ID'. If you add or remove any of hardware, this Master Hardware ID changes.  If enough hardware IDs are changed, the Master ID will change enough it triggered a Reactivation event. When you reactivate, Windows records the current Hardware IDs for the PC and those become the new Master Hardware ID.

      Normally changing the Bio would not change a Hardware ID, but in rare case it can happen.

      My understanding of Motherboards with two Bios chips is that the second Bios is intended as a backup in case the first Bios has a bad Bios configuration (maybe due to attempting a very aggressive Overclock). In this scenario, both Bios chips would have the same Bios version so change from one to the other would not cause this issue.

     However,if you have two separate Bios Version installed one on each chip (and if one or both of those Bios versions changes a Hardware ID) then changing back and forth between the two Bios versions could have the effect you describe.

     

    Thank you,


    Darin MS
    Tuesday, May 31, 2011 8:12 PM
  • "Kenhomza" wrote in message news:1024eba6-669a-404a-96e0-7fa409a53d50...
    Hi, Let me describe what I experience a little better.
    If I have a PC and I alter the BIOS via BIOS Update/Flash, or Dual BIOS Chip Motherboard Switching,
    Windows 7 Product Activation stays current and valid, but for example: after BIOS alteration if I go to Microsoft Download Center and
    Windows 7 Genuine Advantage Validation runs it fails to validate a valid retail distribution of Windows 7 SP1, then does the norm of a failed validation leads you to the Microsoft
    Purchas a Valid Copy and Windows and Reporting Fraud website, anything that uses Windows 7 Genuine Advantage Validation fails to pass validation, installation Windows Updates, Service Packs, Software.
    Even thou If I run the Windows 7 Genuine Advantage Validation Diagnostics Tool it passes.
    The only way I have been able to work around this is to call the 800 # with the PID and the HASH Code and re-Activate Windows even thou Windows say’s it’s already activated.
    It actually happened to me again last night that’s why I posted this, I updated the BIOS on a Win 7 SP1 Notebook, then I went to the Microsoft Download Center and tried to download Microsoft Virtual Machine I wanted to
    test out a Windows server setup idea before I deployed it, anyway during the Download process Windows 7 Genuine Advantage Validation failed.
    It does the same thing if I flip back and forth on other PC’s with Dual BIOS Chip Motherboards and different BIOS versions.
    “My opinion is BIOS version changes cause issues with Windows 7 Genuine Advantage Validation = Software BUG...”
    In the case of OEM installs, changing the  BIOS can invalidate a OEM_SLP Key, due to the new BIOS possibly not having the proper SLIC table present. In the case of Retail installs, this should not present a problem, as the SLIC table is irrelevant.
     
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by Kenhomza Wednesday, June 1, 2011 11:57 AM
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Wednesday, June 1, 2011 9:19 PM
    Wednesday, June 1, 2011 6:46 AM
    Moderator