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How to find list of commands to know for 70-649? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I haven't taken a Microsoft exam in a long time and I want to upgrade my MCSE by taking 70-649 before the exam expires.

    There are questions that require the taker to know some commands and switches that you would type at a cmd prompt.  It is unreasonable to think that I need to memorize every switch to every command in the server OS, so how do I find out what commands/switches I need to know?  The description of the exam has disclaimers like 'You may be tested on other skills and topics related to the objective that are not explicitly listed here.'  and 'This preparation guide is subject to change at any time without prior notice and at the sole discretion of Microsoft'.  Statements like these really kill my confidence to pass the exam!

    Tuesday, January 22, 2013 7:42 PM

Answers

  • Hi Bob,

    Unfortunately, I don't know exactly what commands you should memorize for the 70-649, but I can recommend an excellent resource you can use to learn the commands you're likely to encounter on the exam.

    It's the Windows Server 2008 Portable Command Guide by Darril Gibson, and it covers commands for the three exams that make up the 70-649 (the 70-640, 70-642, and 70-643).

    http://www.amazon.com/Windows-Server-Portable-Command-Guide/dp/0789747375/

    I keep it right above my desk, always within arm's reach, and I find it to be an invaluable resource. Although you can buy the Kindle version on Amazon, I find the printed version to be much more convenient, since you can quickly leaf through the pages to find what you're looking for far more quickly than on a computer.

    I hope this resource proves useful to you, and I wish you every success on your 70-649 exam.

    James

    Friday, January 25, 2013 2:45 PM

All replies

  • Hi Bob,

    Unfortunately, I don't know exactly what commands you should memorize for the 70-649, but I can recommend an excellent resource you can use to learn the commands you're likely to encounter on the exam.

    It's the Windows Server 2008 Portable Command Guide by Darril Gibson, and it covers commands for the three exams that make up the 70-649 (the 70-640, 70-642, and 70-643).

    http://www.amazon.com/Windows-Server-Portable-Command-Guide/dp/0789747375/

    I keep it right above my desk, always within arm's reach, and I find it to be an invaluable resource. Although you can buy the Kindle version on Amazon, I find the printed version to be much more convenient, since you can quickly leaf through the pages to find what you're looking for far more quickly than on a computer.

    I hope this resource proves useful to you, and I wish you every success on your 70-649 exam.

    James

    Friday, January 25, 2013 2:45 PM
  • Thanks James.  I feel this is as close as I'm going to get.

    As I prepare for the exam using Microsoft's recommended self-study kit, I find that I don't like their study materials.  They present a huge array of tables, charts, and vastly detailed information that would require a photographic memory to retain all of it, and present very few practice questions.  So I end up looking at each detailed info page and saying to myself, "ok, is this table something I need to memorize, or is it too trivial to be on the exam?"  I have to pick and choose what to know, because there is no way I'm ever going to be able to memorize it all (and not that I would ever need to, except to pass the exam!).

    Does anyone else feel this way?


    Monday, February 4, 2013 2:20 PM
  • Hi Bob,

    I certainly do agree with you. Through regular use, most of us memorize a small subset of commands and procedures that we use in our daily administration. Anything else we might need can easily be found by using the help function, or by using Google (or Bing).

    Unfortunately, however, we can't do this in the exam, so we need to memorize as much as we can just for this purpose. However, it would certainly make life easier if we knew exactly what commands to learn, but since Microsoft doesn't release this information, a book like the one recommended can certainly be a useful guide.

    It can also be useful to try using as many of the unfamiliar commands as possible regularly in your practice environment. This way they're easier to recall since you now understand their use in context, rather than trying desperately to memorize them in isolation.

    Good luck to you.

    James

    Tuesday, February 5, 2013 6:40 PM