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Don't have product key for XP update (purchased with XP) RRS feed

  • Question

  • We purchased our PC from a previous employer. It runs on Window XP. However, the COA on the case says "Windows 2000 Professional". So the employer upgraded to Windows XP, then sold it to us. But we never got the product key that matches Windows XP. What can we do?

    Thursday, August 30, 2007 4:49 PM

Answers

  • If the computer is still operational and you wish to find the Product Key currently in use:

    Retrieve your Windows XP CD key: http://www.belarc.com/free_download.html  

    Thursday, August 30, 2007 4:58 PM
    Moderator
  • CN3,

     

    If your employer is a medium or larger sized business, it's likely that your employer used a Volume Licensing (VL) Edition of Windows XP Pro to do the upgrade from Windows 2000 Pro to XP Pro.  If so, the unfortunate fact is that YOU do not have a genuine license to run Windows XP Pro on this purchased computer, since the terms of the Volume License do NOT allow the owner of the VL to sell individual copies of the upgrade OS, in this case XP Pro.  Whether the employer's current VL is still valid or not, they are not allowed to sell you a computer with an installation of the VL still on the computer.

     

    You can check to see if the installed XP is a VL by looking at the Product ID number displayed on the General tab of the System Properties dialog box.  To see it, right-click My Computer, and then click Properties.  If the second set of digits (the only 3-digit set) is "270" or any number between "600" and "699," that indicates a VL is installed.

     

    If the employer is a smaller business, they may have used a retail upgrade license to upgrade W2K to XP Pro.  If that Product ID number's second set of digits is anything other than "OEM" or the numbers mentioned above, then it's an indicator that the installed license is a retail license.  In such case, you would have a genuine installation of XP, but it would be to your great benefit to pester the employer to furnish you with the CD and other materials included when they purchased the retail upgrade.

     

    You can run the mgadiag utility http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012  as well--it will report what kind of license for XP Pro is installed on the computer.

     

    If it turns out that the XP Pro license in not valid, the computer is very likely still licensed to run the Windows 2000 Pro that it came with when shipped from its manufacturer, as evidenced by the W2K Pro Certificate of Authenticity (CoA).

    Thursday, August 30, 2007 8:57 PM

All replies

  • If the computer is still operational and you wish to find the Product Key currently in use:

    Retrieve your Windows XP CD key: http://www.belarc.com/free_download.html  

    Thursday, August 30, 2007 4:58 PM
    Moderator
  • CN3,

     

    If your employer is a medium or larger sized business, it's likely that your employer used a Volume Licensing (VL) Edition of Windows XP Pro to do the upgrade from Windows 2000 Pro to XP Pro.  If so, the unfortunate fact is that YOU do not have a genuine license to run Windows XP Pro on this purchased computer, since the terms of the Volume License do NOT allow the owner of the VL to sell individual copies of the upgrade OS, in this case XP Pro.  Whether the employer's current VL is still valid or not, they are not allowed to sell you a computer with an installation of the VL still on the computer.

     

    You can check to see if the installed XP is a VL by looking at the Product ID number displayed on the General tab of the System Properties dialog box.  To see it, right-click My Computer, and then click Properties.  If the second set of digits (the only 3-digit set) is "270" or any number between "600" and "699," that indicates a VL is installed.

     

    If the employer is a smaller business, they may have used a retail upgrade license to upgrade W2K to XP Pro.  If that Product ID number's second set of digits is anything other than "OEM" or the numbers mentioned above, then it's an indicator that the installed license is a retail license.  In such case, you would have a genuine installation of XP, but it would be to your great benefit to pester the employer to furnish you with the CD and other materials included when they purchased the retail upgrade.

     

    You can run the mgadiag utility http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012  as well--it will report what kind of license for XP Pro is installed on the computer.

     

    If it turns out that the XP Pro license in not valid, the computer is very likely still licensed to run the Windows 2000 Pro that it came with when shipped from its manufacturer, as evidenced by the W2K Pro Certificate of Authenticity (CoA).

    Thursday, August 30, 2007 8:57 PM