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MCSE vs MCITP Ent Admin 2008 RRS feed

  • Question

  • I'm trying to draw a line and compare those two certificates. Is here someone that has both of them? Could you compare those two certs and tell me which one was harder to get from your point of view. I'm on path to Ent admin and at this time holds Server 2008 Admin It pro cert.

    I'm asking this as I find exams that a took until now quite hard. When I started to learn I was in dilemma MCSE or Ent Admin. Did I choose harder or they are somewhat the same?

    Sunday, December 18, 2011 10:17 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

    MCSE stops at Windows 2003 which is now pretty old. If you are using Windows 2008 then MCITP is a much better path for you. I found the exams for MCSE difficult when I did my NT4 MCSE and Windows 2000 MCSE but by the time I did Windows 2003 I had a lot more real world experience therefore the exams were easier.

    I found the MCITP Windows 2008 exams fair but I would not say easy if you don't have experience.


    Sean Massey | Consultant, iUNITE

    Feel free to contact me through My Blog or Twitter.
    Please click the Mark as Answer button if a post solves your problem!

    • Proposed as answer by Aparajita Sri Tuesday, December 27, 2011 7:15 AM
    • Marked as answer by Mr. Wharty Thursday, February 2, 2012 6:50 AM
    Sunday, December 18, 2011 10:42 PM
  • Related to this, remember that the MCSE is based on technology that's 8+ years old.  The MCITP is based on the most current technology.  Personally recommendation would be to skip the MCSE entirely.  If you properly prepare (using the right study materials, utilize available practice tests, etc.) then you should do well. 
    • Marked as answer by Mr. Wharty Thursday, February 2, 2012 6:50 AM
    Monday, December 19, 2011 7:21 PM
    Answerer
  • MCSE certification was up to Windows 2003/Windows Vista. The current certification denominations are MCTS (for Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist) and MCITP (for Microsoft Certified It Professional). Please see here for more information http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/cert-overview.aspx.

    As Sean and Charles put it, it's better to move to the most current technology if you are starting a certification. Windows 2008/R2 is a very complex product.

    Windows 8 is coming.

    Alfredo Arizaleta


    Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no express or implied warranties or rights.
    • Marked as answer by Mr. Wharty Thursday, February 2, 2012 6:50 AM
    Thursday, December 22, 2011 8:41 PM
  • MCSE certification was up to Windows 2003/Windows Vista. The current certification denominations are MCTS (for Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist) and MCITP (for Microsoft Certified It Professional). Please see here for more information http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/cert-overview.aspx.

    As Sean and Charles put it, it's better to move to the most current technology if you are starting a certification. Windows 2008/R2 is a very complex product.

    Windows 8 is coming.

    Agreed.  Unless you are already in the middle of the MCSA/MCSE tracks on Windows Server 2003 era technologies, you want to be taking MCTS and PRO exams towards a MCITP certification.

    Although as far as "Windows 8 is coming," it's just NT 6.2.  Windows 8 (NT 6.2) is like Vista (NT 6.0) and 7 / 2008 (NT 6.1) and not as radical as moving from 2000 (NT 5.0) or XP / 2003 (NT 5.1).  The core technologies are there.

    Heck, Windows 7 (NT 6.1) is not that much different than Vista (NT 6.0).  Other than integrating the overlay (from Embedded NT/XP) to address NAND EEPROM device longevity, XP mode (when other compatibility just won't do) and select WGF optimizations (largely Aero and footprint), you can tweak Vista to compare quite well to Windows 7 footprint and performance-wise.

    The most I see is a new level of detail dedicated to NT 6.2 / ARM ports, and that might be more developer only any way (not unlike the CE / Mobile lineage).


    • Edited by TheBS Monday, December 26, 2011 4:23 PM
    • Marked as answer by Mr. Wharty Thursday, February 2, 2012 6:50 AM
    Monday, December 26, 2011 4:19 PM
  • If you are in the middle of a MCSE certification, check what exams are worthy to take toward MCITP.

    Many companies foster the Windows 2003 certifications because a large Windows 2003 platform already running. Many platforms are operationally certified to run on Windows 2003 but not in Windows 2008 or later. In the other hand, the SDLC costs to move could be a deterrent.

    Your comments about the versions of the Windows platforms are true about the past and I could not be certain about a future Windows 6.2. In the one hand, legacy compatibility is an issue and, in the other hand, new processors are in production, new performance issues and new technologies as well.

    Please consider that OS are layered. The OS has a underlaying HAL (Hardware Abstraction Layer) that works in the very same way as the JVM. The ARM/RISC compatibility is a specific HAL for that platform.  But this type of comments are better in other forums, such as Windows 7 or Windows 2008.

    Alfredo Arizaleta 


    Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no express or implied warranties or rights.
    • Marked as answer by Mr. Wharty Thursday, February 2, 2012 6:50 AM
    Tuesday, December 27, 2011 9:06 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    MCSE stops at Windows 2003 which is now pretty old. If you are using Windows 2008 then MCITP is a much better path for you. I found the exams for MCSE difficult when I did my NT4 MCSE and Windows 2000 MCSE but by the time I did Windows 2003 I had a lot more real world experience therefore the exams were easier.

    I found the MCITP Windows 2008 exams fair but I would not say easy if you don't have experience.


    Sean Massey | Consultant, iUNITE

    Feel free to contact me through My Blog or Twitter.
    Please click the Mark as Answer button if a post solves your problem!

    • Proposed as answer by Aparajita Sri Tuesday, December 27, 2011 7:15 AM
    • Marked as answer by Mr. Wharty Thursday, February 2, 2012 6:50 AM
    Sunday, December 18, 2011 10:42 PM
  • Hm, you don't say...

    I cannot say that I am inexperienced and that I had big problems passing exams problem is that on like 40% question I had to go for the "sounds like right" option. I did have very good exam results (more than 90%) nonetheless I was there trying to find the best solution for around 2.5 hours.

    I expected that MCSE was somewhat easier as some of my colleagues were surprised when I told them how much time I spent on the exam, while they are experienced in MCSE.

     

    Thnx on your point of view.

    Monday, December 19, 2011 6:07 PM
  • Related to this, remember that the MCSE is based on technology that's 8+ years old.  The MCITP is based on the most current technology.  Personally recommendation would be to skip the MCSE entirely.  If you properly prepare (using the right study materials, utilize available practice tests, etc.) then you should do well. 
    • Marked as answer by Mr. Wharty Thursday, February 2, 2012 6:50 AM
    Monday, December 19, 2011 7:21 PM
    Answerer
  • MCSE certification was up to Windows 2003/Windows Vista. The current certification denominations are MCTS (for Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist) and MCITP (for Microsoft Certified It Professional). Please see here for more information http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/cert-overview.aspx.

    As Sean and Charles put it, it's better to move to the most current technology if you are starting a certification. Windows 2008/R2 is a very complex product.

    Windows 8 is coming.

    Alfredo Arizaleta


    Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no express or implied warranties or rights.
    • Marked as answer by Mr. Wharty Thursday, February 2, 2012 6:50 AM
    Thursday, December 22, 2011 8:41 PM
  • MCSE certification was up to Windows 2003/Windows Vista. The current certification denominations are MCTS (for Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist) and MCITP (for Microsoft Certified It Professional). Please see here for more information http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/cert-overview.aspx.

    As Sean and Charles put it, it's better to move to the most current technology if you are starting a certification. Windows 2008/R2 is a very complex product.

    Windows 8 is coming.

    Agreed.  Unless you are already in the middle of the MCSA/MCSE tracks on Windows Server 2003 era technologies, you want to be taking MCTS and PRO exams towards a MCITP certification.

    Although as far as "Windows 8 is coming," it's just NT 6.2.  Windows 8 (NT 6.2) is like Vista (NT 6.0) and 7 / 2008 (NT 6.1) and not as radical as moving from 2000 (NT 5.0) or XP / 2003 (NT 5.1).  The core technologies are there.

    Heck, Windows 7 (NT 6.1) is not that much different than Vista (NT 6.0).  Other than integrating the overlay (from Embedded NT/XP) to address NAND EEPROM device longevity, XP mode (when other compatibility just won't do) and select WGF optimizations (largely Aero and footprint), you can tweak Vista to compare quite well to Windows 7 footprint and performance-wise.

    The most I see is a new level of detail dedicated to NT 6.2 / ARM ports, and that might be more developer only any way (not unlike the CE / Mobile lineage).


    • Edited by TheBS Monday, December 26, 2011 4:23 PM
    • Marked as answer by Mr. Wharty Thursday, February 2, 2012 6:50 AM
    Monday, December 26, 2011 4:19 PM
  • If you are in the middle of a MCSE certification, check what exams are worthy to take toward MCITP.

    Many companies foster the Windows 2003 certifications because a large Windows 2003 platform already running. Many platforms are operationally certified to run on Windows 2003 but not in Windows 2008 or later. In the other hand, the SDLC costs to move could be a deterrent.

    Your comments about the versions of the Windows platforms are true about the past and I could not be certain about a future Windows 6.2. In the one hand, legacy compatibility is an issue and, in the other hand, new processors are in production, new performance issues and new technologies as well.

    Please consider that OS are layered. The OS has a underlaying HAL (Hardware Abstraction Layer) that works in the very same way as the JVM. The ARM/RISC compatibility is a specific HAL for that platform.  But this type of comments are better in other forums, such as Windows 7 or Windows 2008.

    Alfredo Arizaleta 


    Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no express or implied warranties or rights.
    • Marked as answer by Mr. Wharty Thursday, February 2, 2012 6:50 AM
    Tuesday, December 27, 2011 9:06 PM
  • Please consider that OS are layered. The OS has a underlaying HAL (Hardware Abstraction Layer) that works in the very same way as the JVM. The ARM/RISC compatibility is a specific HAL for that platform.  But this type of comments are better in other forums, such as Windows 7 or Windows 2008.

    The HAL is not the ultimate abstraction, and no, it's not like the JVM at all, a very, very poor analogy.  You don't have something like "Win32 byte code."  The only facility that was ever capable of such was Digital's FX!32 (allowed Win32/x86 to run on Win32/Alpha).  You also have a lot of x86-only API in Win32/Visual Studio targets as well.  It is very important to understand this, and for those of us who ran NT3/4 on Alpha (in 32-bit mode), 32-bit MIPS and 32-bit PPC, we are very familiar with non-x86 NT targets.

    As far as NT 6.2, the current builds of Windows 8 are NT 6.2.  Most of the internals of Windows 8 are NT 6, not a new platform.  You have Metro and a few other things, but it's still NT 6.  That brings up the question what the next Windows Server will be like from a platform standpoint.  It's likely to be little different than Windows Server 2008, much like NT5.0 to NT5.1 with 2000 and 2003 were not.  Just some refinement in the RPC stack for AD and a few other items.

    Sunday, January 8, 2012 2:16 PM