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A New Era in Microsoft Certification RRS feed

  • General discussion

  • UPDATE:  There's a great Q & A here http://borntolearn.mslearn.net/btl/b/weblog/archive/2012/04/27/your-questions-answered.aspx

    Source: http://blog.wharton.com.au/2012/04/11/a-new-era-in-microsoft-certification/

    Today Microsoft released details of it’s new certification program which is designed to address the growing need for IT Pros and Developers to have skill sets that run both broad and deep.

    At first glance it appears that Microsoft has simply reintroduced acronyms used in previous certification streams (such as MCSD ,
    MCSA and MCSE) however this isn’t so and it’s important to understand that these acronyms now represent new certification structures and requirements, not just a renaming of terminology.

    So What Has Changed?

    As you can see from the diagram below, the new certification program consists of three core levels:

    • Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate (MCSA)
    • Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert (MCSE) / Microsoft Certified Solutions Developer (MCSD)
    • Microsoft Certified Solutions Master (MCSM)

    You will also notice that Microsoft has introduced recertification as a requirement of MCSD/MCSE level certifications.

    SNAGHTML6e71209e

    Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate (MCSA)

    Associate level certifications validate the core skills required to work with a technology at a beginners level.  They also represent the prerequisite certifications required to obtain Expert level certification. 

    Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert (MCSE) & Microsoft Certified Solutions Developer (MCSD)

    The Expert level is Microsoft’s flagship set of certifications validating that skills obtained are relevant in the constantly changing tech environment. The Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert (MCSE) is the destination for established IT Professionals who have expertise working with Microsoft technology solutions.  The Microsoft Certified Solutions Developer (MCSD) is the destination for established Developers who have expertise developing solutions with Microsoft tools.

    As previously stated, Microsoft has also introduced recertification as a requirement of this certification level.

    Microsoft Certified Solutions Master (MCSM)

    This certification is for the select few who wish to further differentiate themselves from their peers and achieve the highest level of skills validation.

    Offers and Promotions

    Microsoft, in conjunction with Prometric, has released the following offer and promotion to assist candidates with achieving MCSA and/or MCSE certification.

    Certification SKU Offer

    If you purchase a set of exams to achieve MCSA or MCSE certification, you will receive a 15-20% discount (depending on the number of exams in the set) off the purchase price.

    Two-for-One Promotion

    Purchase and take a full-priced exam before 30 June 2012 and you will receive, at no cost, a voucher valid for a MCSA or MCSE exam in the same technology.  More information about this offer can be found here.

    Additional Information

    Microsoft Certification overview page: http://aka.ms/MSCerts

    Microsoft Certification overview video: http://aka.ms/MSCertsVideo

    MCSE information page: http://aka.ms/MCSE

    MCSE video on YouTube: http://aka.ms/MCSEvideo

    MCSE Data Platform: http://aka.ms/MCSEDP

    MCSE Business Intelligence: http://aka.ms/MCSEBI

    MCSE Private Cloud: http://aka.ms/MCSEpvcloud


    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript



    Wednesday, April 11, 2012 1:46 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • The MCSA and MCSE acronyms will create a huge confusion amont non technical people, as still today a lot of project managers and HRs are asking for a MCSE and MCSA certifications.

    The MCSM is a successor to todays MCM? So training in Redmond etc?


    Marek Chmel, WBI Systems (MCTS, MCITP, MCT, CCNA)
    Please Mark As Answer if my post solves your problem or Vote As Helpful if a post has been helpful for you.

    Wednesday, April 11, 2012 2:20 PM
  • Hello

    I am rather confused about the new programme. 

    I hold the MCITP: EDST Qualification and am one exam (70-642) away from achieving MCITP: Server Administrator and MCITP:  Enterprise Administrator concurrently.

    Under the new schemes will I get MCSE Server Administrator and MCSE:  Enterprise Administrator or will I still get the ‘old’ qualification.

    If I get the new qualification will I have to re-qualify in 3 years time?

    Thanks in advance.

    R20

    Wednesday, April 11, 2012 7:37 PM
  • Hello

    I am rather confused about the new programme. 

    I hold the MCITP: EDST Qualification and am one exam (70-642) away from achieving MCITP: Server Administrator and MCITP:  Enterprise Administrator concurrently.

    Under the new schemes will I get MCSE Server Administrator and MCSE:  Enterprise Administrator or will I still get the ‘old’ qualification.

    If I get the new qualification will I have to re-qualify in 3 years time?

    Thanks in advance.

    R20

    This is fairly easy .. you will still hold your certifications. The new MCSE and MCSA are available only for SQL 2012 and System Center 2012 today. Later when new products like Exchange 15, Lync 15, Server 8 etc will be released, new certifications will be available in MCSA and MCSE tracks.

    Even today if you will get MCITP:  Enterprise Administrator on Windows Server 2008 (so you dont have to renew, as you can directly see the version of the product in your cert) http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mcitp.aspx#tab2


    Marek Chmel, WBI Systems (MCTS, MCITP, MCT, CCNA)
    Please Mark As Answer if my post solves your problem or Vote As Helpful if a post has been helpful for you.

    Wednesday, April 11, 2012 7:41 PM
  • Thanks Marek

    Good to know my current qualifications will still have been worth the effort. Will there be an upgrade path from MCITP: SA/EA to MCSE Server 8?

    TIA

    Wednesday, April 11, 2012 7:48 PM
  • As far as I know this info is not available yet, but I would guess there will be a upgrade path .. always has been with a huge amount of products.

    Marek Chmel, WBI Systems (MCTS, MCITP, MCT, CCNA)
    Please Mark As Answer if my post solves your problem or Vote As Helpful if a post has been helpful for you.

    Wednesday, April 11, 2012 7:49 PM
  • Hello

    I am rather confused about the new programme. 

    I hold the MCITP: EDST Qualification and am one exam (70-642) away from achieving MCITP: Server Administrator and MCITP:  Enterprise Administrator concurrently.

    Under the new schemes will I get MCSE Server Administrator and MCSE:  Enterprise Administrator or will I still get the ‘old’ qualification.

    If I get the new qualification will I have to re-qualify in 3 years time?

    Thanks in advance.

    R20

    This is fairly easy .. you will still hold your certifications. The new MCSE and MCSA are available only for SQL 2012 and System Center 2012 today. Later when new products like Exchange 15, Lync 15, Server 8 etc will be released, new certifications will be available in MCSA and MCSE tracks.

    Even today if you will get MCITP:  Enterprise Administrator on Windows Server 2008 (so you dont have to renew, as you can directly see the version of the product in your cert) http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mcitp.aspx#tab2


    Marek Chmel, WBI Systems (MCTS, MCITP, MCT, CCNA)
    Please Mark As Answer if my post solves your problem or Vote As Helpful if a post has been helpful for you.


    MCSE Private Cloud certification is also available http://aka.ms/MCSEpvcloud

    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Wednesday, April 11, 2012 11:13 PM
    Moderator
  • I have a question.

    If I already passed required exams of Windows Server 2008 in MCTS era, will I get Solution Associate certification?

    or must take a upgrade exam to earn the new Solution Associate certification?

    Thank you.


    學習不是查個 Google 套個書上的範例就算了,而是去熟悉了解每個程式碼背後的意義,否則就算學個幾百年,它也不會是你的。
    =================================
    小朱的技術隨手寫:http://www.dotblogs.com.tw/regionbbs/
    雲端學堂Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/studyazure

    Thursday, April 12, 2012 2:58 AM
  • I have a question.

    If I already passed required exams of Windows Server 2008 in MCTS era, will I get Solution Associate certification?

    or must take a upgrade exam to earn the new Solution Associate certification?

    Thank you.


    學習不是查個 Google 套個書上的範例就算了,而是去熟悉了解每個程式碼背後的意義,否則就算學個幾百年,它也不會是你的。
    =================================
    小朱的技術隨手寫:http://www.dotblogs.com.tw/regionbbs/
    雲端學堂Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/studyazure


    As long as you've completed 70-640, 70-642 and 70-646 you will be awarded MCSA: Windows Server 2008

    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Thursday, April 12, 2012 3:00 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks for your answer.

    I am certified by using upgrade exam of Windows Server 2008 MCTS (70-649), it includes 70-640, 70-642 and 70-643.

    I am also certified with 70-646 (MCITP: Server Administrator).

    So... I think I can earn MCSA: Windows Server 2008.


    學習不是查個 Google 套個書上的範例就算了,而是去熟悉了解每個程式碼背後的意義,否則就算學個幾百年,它也不會是你的。
    =================================
    小朱的技術隨手寫:http://www.dotblogs.com.tw/regionbbs/
    雲端學堂Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/studyazure

    Thursday, April 12, 2012 3:55 AM
  • Hi Jeff

    So in that case I will get MCITP: Server Administrator and MCSA: Windows Server 2008 when I pass the 70-642?

    Thanks


    Thursday, April 12, 2012 7:17 AM
  • Think we’re going to have a lot of confused people out there.

    Few issues I feel have been over looked:

    1. Any previous MCSE/MCSA (as in systems engineer / administrator) has now again automatically got an up to date sounding certification.
    2. The new MCSA (solutions associate) is now made out to be ‘entry level’ which is very misleading in terms of the technical ability required to pass the 3 required exams. (Why not just call it Microsoft Certified Server Administrator if the desire was to stick with the MCSA name).
    3. The difference between an ‘Associate’ and ‘Expert’ to me sounds like complete opposite ends of the ability spectrum, and not 2 exams worth of knowledge.
    Thursday, April 12, 2012 8:30 AM
  • Think we’re going to have a lot of confused people out there.

    Few issues I feel have been over looked:

    1. Any previous MCSE/MCSA (as in systems engineer / administrator) has now again automatically got an up to date sounding certification.
    2. The new MCSA (solutions associate) is now made out to be ‘entry level’ which is very misleading in terms of the technical ability required to pass the 3 required exams. (Why not just call it Microsoft Certified Server Administrator if the desire was to stick with the MCSA name).
    3. The difference between an ‘Associate’ and ‘Expert’ to me sounds like complete opposite ends of the ability spectrum, and not 2 exams worth of knowledge.

    and also the associate will be confused with this strange and no one knows why released certification http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mta.aspx
    I think that Microsoft Learning has created a huge confusion with new certs, this will be a huge mess for someone who just looks for a certified person. Many HRs and IT Managers dont have any idea about the certifications, and I am still getting request to show my MCSA and MCDBA certs ...

     

    Marek Chmel, WBI Systems (MCTS, MCITP, MCT, CCNA)
    Please Mark As Answer if my post solves your problem or Vote As Helpful if a post has been helpful for you.

    Thursday, April 12, 2012 8:34 AM
  • and also the associate will be confused with this strange and no one knows why released certification http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mta.aspx
    I think that Microsoft Learning has created a huge confusion with new certs, this will be a huge mess for someone who just looks for a certified person. Many HRs and IT Managers dont have any idea about the certifications, and I am still getting request to show my MCSA and MCDBA certs ...

     

    Marek Chmel, WBI Systems (MCTS, MCITP, MCT, CCNA)
    Please Mark As Answer if my post solves your problem or Vote As Helpful if a post has been helpful for you.

    Agreed - the MTA is for designed for students and is a true entry level cert designed to lead on to higher level MCTS exams... as you said, it's a mess. 

    Thursday, April 12, 2012 10:05 AM
  • 1) MCSA/MCSE acronyms will cause confusion. 

    Yes there may be some confusion however this will reduce over time.  Some confusion was also experienced when Microsoft moved to MCTS/MCITP however people now understand these credentials.  Furthermore, the full title for the new MCSA & MCSE certification are:

    MCSA: SQL Server 2012 or MCSA: Windows Server 2008
    MCSE: Data Platform or MCSE: Bussiness Intelligence or MCSE: Private Cloud. 

    This structure will also be used for future certifications

    2) MCSM in Redmond 

    SQL Server MCSM does not need to be studied in Redmond.  It uses the same study methods available to MCM SQL Server 2008.

    Can't comment on Windows Server related MCSM.

    3) HR/Project Managers will get confused when hiring staff and HR/Project Managers have no idea about certifications. 

    See (1) above. 

    There will always be issues with non-IT Professionals hiring IT Professionals, irrespective of the acronyms used.  I can’t vouch for others however my organisation uses IT Professionals to hire IT Professionals.  Using non-IT Proefessionals would be like asking someone working as a car mechanic to hire a receptionist;  they may eventually hire someone however it’s likely that person won’t have the required skills.

    4) Will I still get MCTS/MCITP when I pass exams.

    SQL Server 2008 certifications (MCTS/MCITP) will retire in July 2013 therefore you will still be awarded a MCTS/MCITP if you pass exams related to these certifications.  

    i don't know when Windows Server 2008 certifications will expire however the same rules apply i.e. You will get relevant MCTS/MCITP certifications when passing exams.

    5) Any previous MCSE/MCSA (as in systems engineer / administrator) has now again automatically got an up to date sounding certification. 

    They may sound the same however it will be easy to distinguish between the new and old certifications (See 1 above re naming conventions)

    6) MCSA level is too difficult

    MCSA now reflects what should have been the entry level all along.  Having a certification program where someone can read a few chapters in a book, do a couple of labs online, pass an exam and then market themselves as a Technology Specialist is so wrong.  i actually think Microsoft should have made the MCSA entry level even harder.

    7) MTA certification. 

    This certification was released to assist School/TAFE/University students move into a career using Microsoft technologies.  Students and their representative organisation are well aware of this certification and it has proven to be very popular.  I fail to see how this certification is confusing.


    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Thursday, April 12, 2012 11:43 PM
    Moderator
  • 1) MCSA/MCSE acronyms will cause confusion. 

    Yes there may be some confusion however this will reduce over time.  Some confusion was also experienced when Microsoft moved to MCTS/MCITP however people now understand these credentials.  Furthermore, the full title for the new MCSA & MCSE certification are:

    MCSA: SQL Server 2012 or MCSA: Windows Server 2008
    MCSE: Data Platform or MCSE: Bussiness Intelligence or MCSE: Private Cloud. 

    This structure will also be used for future certifications

    2) MCSM in Redmond 

    SQL Server MCSM does not need to be studied in Redmond.  It uses the same study methods available to MCM SQL Server 2008.

    Can't comment on Windows Server related MCSM.

    3) HR/Project Managers will get confused when hiring staff and HR/Project Managers have no idea about certifications. 

    See (1) above. 

    There will always be issues with non-IT Professionals hiring IT Professionals, irrespective of the acronyms used.  I can’t vouch for others however my organisation uses IT Professionals to hire IT Professionals.  Using non-IT Proefessionals would be like asking someone working as a car mechanic to hire a receptionist;  they may eventually hire someone however it’s likely that person won’t have the required skills.

    4) Will I still get MCTS/MCITP when I pass exams.

    SQL Server 2008 certifications (MCTS/MCITP) will retire in July 2013 therefore you will still be awarded a MCTS/MCITP if you pass exams related to these certifications.  

    i don't know when Windows Server 2008 certifications will expire however the same rules apply i.e. You will get relevant MCTS/MCITP certifications when passing exams.

    5) Any previous MCSE/MCSA (as in systems engineer / administrator) has now again automatically got an up to date sounding certification. 

    They may sound the same however it will be easy to distinguish between the new and old certifications (See 1 above re naming conventions)

    6) MCSA level is too difficult

    MCSA now reflects what should have been the entry level all along.  Having a certification program where someone can read a few chapters in a book, do a couple of labs online, pass an exam and then market themselves as a Technology Specialist is so wrong.  i actually think Microsoft should have made the MCSA entry level even harder.

    7) MTA certification. 

    This certification was released to assist School/TAFE/University students move into a career using Microsoft technologies.  Students and their representative organisation are well aware of this certification and it has proven to be very popular.  I fail to see how this certification is confusing.

    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript


    1. Its not the same like with MCTS/ITPRO as there is some ambiguity with older acronyms. I agree that after some time things will get more clear, but this could have been avoided. I know that there is a full title for the certification, but more people use acronyms only.

    2. Some MCM programs do require the training in Redmond, some do not. We will se in the future how this will be changed with MCSM.

    3. Lucky you, I have seen many companies, where non-IT personel are hiring IT personel, you know the result :)

    4. good to know

    5. see (1)

    6. absolutely right !!!

    7. In our country I havent heard about students taking this Certification, usually university students go directly for MCTS exams .. there I have to agree with you that its strange to call one technology specialist after passing one exam, sometimes with no real experience. I see the confusion with the name "Associate", try to understand there are a lot of people (again mainly nonIT personel) who dont speak english, they just can recognize a word or acronym, but they have no idea what does it mean.


    Marek Chmel, WBI Systems (MCTS, MCITP, MCT, CCNA)
    Please Mark As Answer if my post solves your problem or Vote As Helpful if a post has been helpful for you.

    Friday, April 13, 2012 5:17 AM
  • I see the confusion with the name "Associate", try to understand there are a lot of people (again mainly nonIT personel) who dont speak english, they just can recognize a word or acronym, but they have no idea what does it mean.


    Marek Chmel, WBI Systems (MCTS, MCITP, MCT, CCNA)
    Please Mark As Answer if my post solves your problem or Vote As Helpful if a post has been helpful for you.

    I understand and this is probably one of the things that made it very difficult for Microsoft to come up with a set of acronyms which represent IT Pro, Developer and Business Intelligence certifications


    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Friday, April 13, 2012 5:28 AM
    Moderator
  • I am an MCITP Enterprise Admin in w2k8. I am now willing to do Exchange Admin certification, any changes in this too.?

    Thanks and Regards Mohamed

    Friday, April 13, 2012 2:08 PM
  • Thanks for your answer.

    I am certified by using upgrade exam of Windows Server 2008 MCTS (70-649), it includes 70-640, 70-642 and 70-643.

    I am also certified with 70-646 (MCITP: Server Administrator).

    So... I think I can earn MCSA: Windows Server 2008.


    學習不是查個 Google 套個書上的範例就算了,而是去熟悉了解每個程式碼背後的意義,否則就算學個幾百年,它也不會是你的。
    =================================
    小朱的技術隨手寫:http://www.dotblogs.com.tw/regionbbs/
    雲端學堂Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/studyazure

    Hi,

    I have the same question.  I achieved my MCITP: Server Administrator on Windows Server 2008 (and Enterprise Administrator) via a MCSE 2003 and the upgrade exam 70-649.  This combination served as the equivalent of 70-640, 642, and 646. 

    I just got off the phone with the Australian Certification Call Center and they informed me that unlike the requirements for the MCITP, which are currently identical to the MCSA 2008, I would have to take the three individual exams to obtain the MSCA, before I could get the new MCSE!  This result is absurd as it requires me to take three exams on material I have already been tested on, not to mention material that is about to be superseded by Windows Server 8 exams!

    Has anyone received a different response?  Does anyone have contact details for anyone that actually has some authority in this matter?

    Thanks,

     

    David Stanton  MCSE, MCITP, Partner

    Perth, Australia

    Monday, April 16, 2012 7:44 AM
  • Information on MCSE 2003 is still on Microsoft's website http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mcse-previous.aspx

    This information can also be reached via the FAQ at http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mcse.aspx#tab2


    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Tuesday, April 17, 2012 5:18 AM
    Moderator
  • I would also be interested in a response to D Stanton's question. Are people really being told that they have to sit teh same 3 exams again to get the new qualification???
    Tuesday, April 17, 2012 8:06 AM
  • I would also be interested in a response to D Stanton's question. Are people really being told that they have to sit teh same 3 exams again to get the new qualification???

    I have escalated Mr Stanton's question to Microsoft for comment.

    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Tuesday, April 17, 2012 8:25 AM
    Moderator
  • For those seeking certification in the W2k8 areas, should I disregard the MCITP: Enterprise Admin path (70-640, 642, 643, 647), and focus on the new MCSA path(70-640, 642, 646)? Or is there still some significance in continuing to pursue the MCITP cert?
    Tuesday, April 17, 2012 11:27 PM
  • The MCITP: Enterprise Administrator certification is still a worthwile path to go down as the MCITP on Windows Server 2008 certification requires a skill set that differs from the skill set needed for the new MCSA and MCSE certifications.


    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Tuesday, April 17, 2012 11:48 PM
    Moderator
  • Thank you for looking into this.

    This morning I received what appears to be an automated congratulation from mswwprog@microsoft.com, congratulating me on my new certification.  I followed the link to the mcp site and even though it does not list a new certs on the opening screen (my experience is that it only lists single exam certs on the opening summary screen), after examining my actual transcript I find I now have the MCSA certification for Windows 2008.

    It appears one of the many Microsoft hands does not know what the other is doing, but they actually got it right.

    In summary: It appears that the MCSA Certification is being given to those who pass the three current exams listed in the announcement AND to those who obtained the MCITP in Server 2008 Administration via a MCSE 2003 and the upgrade exam 70-649  (70-649 is being counted as equivalent to 70-640  and 70-642).  In even shorter summary, if you have the MCITP: Server Administrator on Windows Server 2008, Microsoft appears to be giving you the the new MCSA certification.

    Thanks again,

    David Stanton MCSE, MCITP, Partner

    Perth, Australia
    Wednesday, April 18, 2012 2:16 AM
  • Just a note to point out that Microsoft is not currently even using the acronyms in their transcripts  Note no abreviation for Microcrosoft Certified Solution Associate below.  MCITP and MCTS abreviations are included for recent certs; however, older certs do not use the MCSE and MCSA abreviations on the transcript either . 

    David Stanton  MCSE, MCITP, Partner

    Perth, Australia

    Wednesday, April 18, 2012 2:56 AM
  • That makes perfect sense.

    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Wednesday, April 18, 2012 3:00 AM
    Moderator
  • This is a terrible change on Microsoft's part for the following reasons:

    1) 
    Job postings still request MCSE candidates even though it doesn't even
    exist anymore.  Now it exists again, but it means something else!  So
    when someone posts for an MCSE 2008, are they really asking for an
    MCITP: EA (which I am), or a new MCSE private cloud cert?  This
    confusion will damage the already diminishing respect for Microsoft
    certifications.

    2)  They are damaging the credibility of those who
    have acheived an MCITP: EA by giving us only an MCSA cert.  If they
    wanted to revert to the more sought after MCSE acronym, they should have
    just renamed the MCITP: EA cert to MCSE 2008 and then introduced a new
    MCSE private cloud cert.  Instead they have alienated those of us who
    invested time and money into acheiving an MCITP: EA cert.  Those who
    simply acheived an MCITP: SA cert were also awarded MCSA certs today. 
    So did I waste my time and money?

    3)  The recertification
    requirement is ubsurd.  They should have simply maintained the model of
    indication the OS you are certified in OR introduced an continuing
    education program like CISSP does.  That is more relevant than requiring
    a paid test every 3 years.

    I have read several other forums and it appears that everyone who
    currently holds a Microsoft cert is having a similar reaction to me.  I
    hope Microsoft is listening and I hope they correct this poor decision
    shortly. 
    Wednesday, April 18, 2012 3:03 AM
  • This is a terrible change on Microsoft's part for the following reasons:

    1) 
    Job postings still request MCSE candidates even though it doesn't even
    exist anymore.  Now it exists again, but it means something else!  So
    when someone posts for an MCSE 2008, are they really asking for an
    MCITP: EA (which I am), or a new MCSE private cloud cert?  This
    confusion will damage the already diminishing respect for Microsoft
    certifications.

    2)  They are damaging the credibility of those who
    have acheived an MCITP: EA by giving us only an MCSA cert.  If they
    wanted to revert to the more sought after MCSE acronym, they should have
    just renamed the MCITP: EA cert to MCSE 2008 and then introduced a new
    MCSE private cloud cert.  Instead they have alienated those of us who
    invested time and money into acheiving an MCITP: EA cert.  Those who
    simply acheived an MCITP: SA cert were also awarded MCSA certs today. 
    So did I waste my time and money?

    3)  The recertification
    requirement is ubsurd.  They should have simply maintained the model of
    indication the OS you are certified in OR introduced an continuing
    education program like CISSP does.  That is more relevant than requiring
    a paid test every 3 years.

    I have read several other forums and it appears that everyone who
    currently holds a Microsoft cert is having a similar reaction to me.  I
    hope Microsoft is listening and I hope they correct this poor decision
    shortly. 

    1) MCSE still exists so not sure where you're getting your information from.

    Information on MCSE 2003 is still on Microsoft's website http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mcse-previous.aspx

    This information can also be reached via the FAQ at http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mcse.aspx#tab2

    MCSE 2008 doesn't exist so if someone is advertising for a specialist with this certification, they probably have no idea about technology.

    The diminishing respect for Microsoft certifications mostly relates to the fact that some certifications are far too easy to obtain and people who hold certifications aren't required to undertake recertification. MCITP: EA and MCITP: SA certifications are perfect examples of this as people who got their certification prior to the release of R2 can’t be differentiated from people who got there certification after the release of R2.  Yes MS could have released new certifications for R2 however people with MCITP: EA or MCITP: SA certifications would probably complain about having to update (recertify) their old certification.

    2) They're only giving you MCSA as nothing else exists at the moment.  Very difficult to award a certification if no certification exists!

    3) Disagree. There are way too many certified people who market themselves as IT Professionals in a given technology when they're clearly not. Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2 is a perfect example of this. People with MCITP: SA or MCITP: EA are marketing themselves as R2 specialists however they have no certification to prove it. 

    Recertification should have been introduced when Microsoft moved to MCITP and MCTS.  Given the rate of change in the technology sector, recertification should occur yearly.  I'm pretty sure you'd be horrified if you discovered that the pilot flying a plane you were on hadn't been retrainined for 3yrs.

    With regards to your comment on “paying” for an exam every 3yrs, are you seriously insinuating that you can’t afford to do this?  As an IT Professional, you should be renewing your skills far more frequently than every 3yrs.

    4) Like you I have read many post on various forums however unlike you, these posts have been praising the changes, especially in relation to recertification.  The only people who seem to be complaining about these changes are those people not prepared to invest time and money into keeping their certifications up to date.


    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript




    Wednesday, April 18, 2012 3:21 AM
    Moderator
  • This is a terrible change on Microsoft's part for the following reasons:

    1) 
    Job postings still request MCSE candidates even though it doesn't even
    exist anymore.  Now it exists again, but it means something else!  So
    when someone posts for an MCSE 2008, are they really asking for an
    MCITP: EA (which I am), or a new MCSE private cloud cert?  This
    confusion will damage the already diminishing respect for Microsoft
    certifications.

    2)  They are damaging the credibility of those who
    have acheived an MCITP: EA by giving us only an MCSA cert.  If they
    wanted to revert to the more sought after MCSE acronym, they should have
    just renamed the MCITP: EA cert to MCSE 2008 and then introduced a new
    MCSE private cloud cert.  Instead they have alienated those of us who
    invested time and money into acheiving an MCITP: EA cert.  Those who
    simply acheived an MCITP: SA cert were also awarded MCSA certs today. 
    So did I waste my time and money?

    3)  The recertification
    requirement is ubsurd.  They should have simply maintained the model of
    indication the OS you are certified in OR introduced an continuing
    education program like CISSP does.  That is more relevant than requiring
    a paid test every 3 years.

    I have read several other forums and it appears that everyone who
    currently holds a Microsoft cert is having a similar reaction to me.  I
    hope Microsoft is listening and I hope they correct this poor decision
    shortly. 

    1) MCSE still exists so not sure where you're getting your information from.

    Information on MCSE 2003 is still on Microsoft's website http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mcse-previous.aspx

    This information can also be reached via the FAQ at http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mcse.aspx#tab2

    MCSE 2008 doesn't exist so if someone is advertising for a specialist with this certification, they probably have no idea about technology.

    The diminishing respect for Microsoft certifications mostly relates to the fact that some certifications are far too easy to obtain and people who hold certifications aren't required to undertake recertification. MCITP: EA and MCITP: SA certifications are perfect examples of this as people who got their certification prior to the release of R2 can’t be differentiated from people who got there certification after the release of R2.  Yes MS could have released new certifications for R2 however people with MCITP: EA or MCITP: SA certifications would probably complain about having to update (recertify) their old certification.

    2) They're only giving you MCSA as nothing else exists at the moment.  Very difficult to award a certification if no certification exists!

    3) Disagree. There are way too many certified people who market themselves as IT Professionals in a given technology when they're clearly not. Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2 is a perfect example of this. People with MCITP: SA or MCITP: EA are marketing themselves as R2 specialists however they have no certification to prove it. 

    Recertification should have been introduced when Microsoft moved to MCITP and MCTS.  Given the rate of change in the technology sector, recertification should occur yearly.  I'm pretty sure you'd be horrified if you discovered that the pilot flying a plane you were on hadn't been retrainined for 3yrs.

    With regards to your comment on “paying” for an exam every 3yrs, are you seriously insinuating that you can’t afford to do this?  As an IT Professional, you should be renewing your skills far more frequently than every 3yrs.

    4) Like you I have read many post on various forums however unlike you, these posts have been praising the changes, especially in relation to recertification.  The only people who seem to be complaining about these changes are those people not prepared to invest time and money into keeping their certifications up to date.


    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript





    3. cannot agree more, the recertification should have been around much sooner. There is absolutely no reason, why IT professional should not renew the certification!!! Maybe yearly is to frequent, but at least with every R2 edition there should be a recertification.

    Marek Chmel, WBI Systems (MCTS, MCITP, MCT, CCNA)
    Please Mark As Answer if my post solves your problem or Vote As Helpful if a post has been helpful for you.

    Wednesday, April 18, 2012 6:24 AM
  • 3) Disagree. There are way too many certified people who market themselves as IT Professionals in a given technology when they're clearly not. Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2 is a perfect example of this. People with MCITP: SA or MCITP: EA are marketing themselves as R2 specialists however they have no certification to prove it. 

    If those who only did the R1 material like D Stanton are automatically being awarded the MCSA 2008 qualification as well as those who did the R2 material then how exactly does the new scheme address this?


    Wednesday, April 18, 2012 9:04 AM
  • 3) Disagree. There are way too many certified people who market themselves as IT Professionals in a given technology when they're clearly not. Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2 is a perfect example of this. People with MCITP: SA or MCITP: EA are marketing themselves as R2 specialists however they have no certification to prove it. 

    If those who only did the R1 material like D Stanton are automatically being awarded the MCSA 2008 qualification as well as those who did the R2 material then how exactly does the new scheme address this?



    I don't agree that people with MCITP: EA or MCITP: SA should automatically be awarded MCSA: Windows Server 2008.  They should have been made to do an upgrade exam.  This is one of the few complaints I have with the new certification program.

    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Wednesday, April 18, 2012 9:27 AM
    Moderator
  • This is a terrible change on Microsoft's part for the following reasons:

    1) 
    Job postings still request MCSE candidates even though it doesn't even
    exist anymore.  Now it exists again, but it means something else!  So
    when someone posts for an MCSE 2008, are they really asking for an
    MCITP: EA (which I am), or a new MCSE private cloud cert?  This
    confusion will damage the already diminishing respect for Microsoft
    certifications.

    1) MCSE still exists so not sure where you're getting your information from.

    Information on MCSE 2003 is still on Microsoft's website http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mcse-previous.aspx

    This information can also be reached via the FAQ at http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mcse.aspx#tab2

    MCSE 2008 doesn't exist so if someone is advertising for a specialist with this certification, they probably have no idea about technology.

    Actually, it is a large problem, even for so called "professional recruiters". At least 50% of job ads ask for credentials that do not exist. This counts for Microsoft certs as well as other supplier certs. Especially when the primary spoken language is not English, things get worse.

    So brushing it away and saying "MCSE 2008 doesn't exist so if someone is advertising for a specialist with this certification, they probably have no idea about technology." does not actually help customers get the IT Pro's they need for the job at hand. The reality is that most recruiters and customers have absolutely no idea on what a credential means, but because every recruiter in the market wants the best fit, they ask for the best credentials they have heard of, whether it exists or not!


    Wednesday, April 18, 2012 9:38 AM
  • This is a terrible change on Microsoft's part for the following reasons:

    1) 
    Job postings still request MCSE candidates even though it doesn't even
    exist anymore.  Now it exists again, but it means something else!  So
    when someone posts for an MCSE 2008, are they really asking for an
    MCITP: EA (which I am), or a new MCSE private cloud cert?  This
    confusion will damage the already diminishing respect for Microsoft
    certifications.

    1) MCSE still exists so not sure where you're getting your information from.

    Information on MCSE 2003 is still on Microsoft's website http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mcse-previous.aspx

    This information can also be reached via the FAQ at http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mcse.aspx#tab2

    MCSE 2008 doesn't exist so if someone is advertising for a specialist with this certification, they probably have no idea about technology.

    Actually, it is a large problem, even for so called "professional recruiters". At least 50% of job ads ask for credentials that do not exist. This counts for Microsoft certs as well as other supplier certs. Especially when the primary spoken language is not English, things get worse.

    So brushing it away and saying "MCSE 2008 doesn't exist so if someone is advertising for a specialist with this certification, they probably have no idea about technology." does not actually help customers get the IT Pro's they need for the job at hand. The reality is that most recruiters and customers have absolutely no idea on what a credential means, but because every recruiter in the market wants the best fit, they ask for the best credentials they have heard of, whether it exists or not!


    It's not Microsoft's fault that companies and recruiters don't understand certifications (especially considering that there's a plethora of information about certifications available) and these sorts of “hiring” issues will occur irrespective of what Microsoft does because the wrong people are hiring staff. Customers need to take responsibility for their actions and blaming Microsoft for the hiring of “unqualified” staff is just a cop-out. As I stated above, would you get a motor mechanic to hire a receptionist?


    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript


    Wednesday, April 18, 2012 9:45 AM
    Moderator
  • I dont see what the big deal is with whatever MS choose to name certifications. Keep up to date with certifications will prevent people from not meeting non technical HR certification requirements. When you have your interview you can educate the people interviewing you on the new current certifications.

    I agree they should have waited to release the new certifications using exams based on the new platform soon to be released. I cannot wait until the new MCSE certifications start rolling out with the new platforms soon to be release.

    I dont understand why people are always looking at something to pick about. YES recertification is a requirement now :) Either recertifiy are get left behind. Having said that i know that certification is not everything, but it sure helps when you have the years of experience and the certification when seeking employment. I have unfortunately worked with people that have 10+ years of experience and no certification and sadly they have all been pretty crappy at what they do, unfortunately they are the only ones that dont realise it.


    • Edited by Jamie132 Wednesday, April 18, 2012 9:07 PM
    Wednesday, April 18, 2012 9:07 PM
  • Back in the "bad old days" - microsoft caught a lot of static from certain quarters for the use of the term "Engineer", as in MCSE = Microsoft Certififed System Engineer. Those with University degrees felt Microsoft was usrping the title.

    Personally, I assumed that was one of the reasons the current MCITP came about - as a transition so Microsoft could rename the certification - substituting Expert (much more generic - less controvrsy). I Think Checkpoint did much the same in changing their CCSA and CCSE to mean Expert too.

    Also, just o keep mining the "Bad old days" - there was a minor firestorm when Microsoft sought to institute a retroactive re-certification requirement on the old MCSE/MCSA certitication, and finally relented after many techs revolted.

    HR staff, as mentioned do not seem to understand what MCITP means, which explains why so many skill request/requirments still ask for MCSE/MCSA. After spending all those years establishing the MCSE/MCSA 'brand' as the premier certification for Microsoft certifications, I never could see why they wanted to toss in in the dust bin anyway?

    Now its been revived and all the old issues are being addressed with a new name and with the new requirments to renew periodically. Seems they cleaned everything thing up in one fell swoop... should be another "Cash Cow" for Team Microsoft..


    Yes, ... that Beoweolf

    Thursday, April 19, 2012 1:46 AM
  • It appears that Microsoft is awarding MCSA: Windows Server 2008 to people with the MCITP: EA certification.

    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Friday, April 20, 2012 4:40 AM
    Moderator
  • One question

    Is Microsoft going to run both certification programs (Microsoft Certifications and Microsoft Cloud-built Certifications) in parallel?

    Or they are going to drop MCITP slowly like what happened with MCSE/MCSA 2003 when MCITP was introduced?

    The reason for this question is, Microsoft called the new certificate program as "Cloud built certifications", does it mean only the cloud related technologies will be added to this certification program? Say when the Windows 8 certifications come out, is it going to be Microsoft Certifications or Microsoft Cloud-built Certifications?

    Friday, April 20, 2012 12:08 PM
  • Microsoft will be releasing new certifications based around MCSA/MCSE just as they have with SQL Server 2012.

    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Friday, April 20, 2012 12:11 PM
    Moderator
  • What About MCSE 2003 ??? Expired or not ???
    Thursday, April 26, 2012 7:24 AM
  • As stated above, this certification is still valid

    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Thursday, April 26, 2012 7:25 AM
    Moderator
  • Any word on the release date of the remaining exams? Do you think they will release that information before or after they release Server 8?

    Curious because like many other's i'm currently working towards an MCITP: EA, if they end up rolling that into the MCSA then i'm not going to waste my time taking the extra exams required for the MCITP: EA.

    I have a feeling once the release date of the server OS comes closer they will outline what they are going to do with the MCITP: EA, just curious if you've heard of anything.

    Thursday, April 26, 2012 2:56 PM
  • For the 2 for 1 promotion could i pay for the 70-640 exam and take the 70-647 for free?
    Thursday, April 26, 2012 3:50 PM
  • I believe the 2 for 1 promotion is just for new certifications. So you can take either the 70-640 or 70-647 exams but that will only get you a free voucher for the server 2012 private cloud.

    So it's 2 for 1, but the free exam is limited to either Windows 8, Server 2012 private cloud, SQL 2012 or Visual studio 2012.

    http://social.microsoft.com/Forums/en/CertGeneral/thread/af47ead1-1525-4f64-9916-142e6990c350

    Thursday, April 26, 2012 4:31 PM
  • I believe the 2 for 1 promotion is just for new certifications. So you can take either the 70-640 or 70-647 exams but that will only get you a free voucher for the server 2012 private cloud.

    So it's 2 for 1, but the free exam is limited to either Windows 8, Server 2012 private cloud, SQL 2012 or Visual studio 2012.

    http://social.microsoft.com/Forums/en/CertGeneral/thread/af47ead1-1525-4f64-9916-142e6990c350

    Correct

    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Thursday, April 26, 2012 10:39 PM
    Moderator
  • Any word on the release date of the remaining exams? Do you think they will release that information before or after they release Server 8?

    Curious because like many other's i'm currently working towards an MCITP: EA, if they end up rolling that into the MCSA then i'm not going to waste my time taking the extra exams required for the MCITP: EA.

    I have a feeling once the release date of the server OS comes closer they will outline what they are going to do with the MCITP: EA, just curious if you've heard of anything.

    MCITP: EA won't be rolled up into MCSA as MCSA is an entry level certification.

    Not sure what other exams Microsoft has planned or when they'll e released.


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    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Thursday, April 26, 2012 10:43 PM
    Moderator
  • So I understand that MCSE 2003 is still valid if you already have it.  What if you are only one test away.  Can you still obtain it? or should I not bother.  I know it's an old cert, but It would be more of a personal acomplisment.

    Nate

    Saturday, April 28, 2012 1:03 AM
  • So I understand that MCSE 2003 is still valid if you already have it.  What if you are only one test away.  Can you still obtain it? or should I not bother.  I know it's an old cert, but It would be more of a personal acomplisment.

    Nate

    Which exam do you still need to do?

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    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Saturday, April 28, 2012 1:18 AM
    Moderator
  • So I understand that MCSE 2003 is still valid if you already have it.  What if you are only one test away.  Can you still obtain it? or should I not bother.  I know it's an old cert, but It would be more of a personal acomplisment.


    Nate

    Which exam do you still need to do?

    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript


    70-293

    Nate

    Saturday, April 28, 2012 1:29 AM
  • So I understand that MCSE 2003 is still valid if you already have it.  What if you are only one test away.  Can you still obtain it? or should I not bother.  I know it's an old cert, but It would be more of a personal acomplisment.


    Nate

    Which exam do you still need to do?

    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript


    70-293

    Nate

    This exam is still available so I'd recommend sitting it as soon as you can.

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    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Saturday, April 28, 2012 1:54 AM
    Moderator
  • There's a great Q & A here http://borntolearn.mslearn.net/btl/b/weblog/archive/2012/04/27/your-questions-answered.aspx

    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Monday, April 30, 2012 10:46 PM
    Moderator
  • Some more clarification on MCSA 2003

    Microsoft has advised that MCSA 2003 is still available as per the following link:

    http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mcsa-previous.aspx#tab2

    Note: Many of the exams in this certification track are retired. If a required exam is retired and you have not yet passed that exam, you cannot complete the certification track. You must fulfill all listed requirements to earn the certification. If you passed a required exam before it retired, it can be applied toward certification.

    Microsoft has also advised that the following Q&A found in the FAQ at http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mcsa.aspx is incorrect and will be removed:

    Q. What is the difference between the new Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate (MCSA) certifications and the previous Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator certifications?

    A. The new Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate (MCSA) credential focuses on the ability to design and build technology solutions. The previous Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator certification focused on a specific job role and can no longer be earned.

    I hope this clarifies some of the confusion surrounding the old MCSA 2003 certification


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    Jeff Wharton
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    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Friday, May 11, 2012 11:06 PM
    Moderator