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Will Wii Rock You? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Nintendo, the ageing rock star, pops some pills, cuts its hair, and jumps on-stage singing a new tune and raring to go. Will the Wii herald a powerful comeback or be the swan’s last song?
    Saturday, March 17, 2007 6:25 AM

Answers

  • The most striking feature of the Wii is doubtless its controller. Dubbed the Wii Remote and rechristened “Wiimote” by the Internet, the controller resembles a simplified TV remote—something everyone is familiar and comfortable with. The Wiimote can be waved as a sword, or swung as a bat or golf club; it can be cast as a fishing reel, or used as a steering wheel.

    The Wiimote gets its mojo from motion tracking: it can detect its own position and orientation via a conjunction of accelerometers and an infrared sensor. The accelerometers determine roll, pitch, yaw, and directional movements. These are then communicated to the console via Bluetooth. The Wiimote can also track its own position relative to the console: this is done via a thin, small sensor bar that can either sit above or below a TV set—the bar houses infrared lights that are tracked by a camera embedded in the Wiimote, much like an actual TV remote’s IR window. The Wiimote is thus able to act as a pointer on the TV screen, analogous to how a PC mouse works: small movements on the mouse pad are converted to mouse movements onscreen.
    A game made for the Wii may or may not make use of this pointer functionality—action FPS Red Steel does, while racing game Excite Truck doesn’t.

    When the Wiimote was designed, Shigeru Miyamoto wanted a more modular hardware, something that could suit multiple purposes at minimal cost. The Wiimote thus has an expansion port for accessories. The Nunchuk, one such accessory, comes bundled with the Wii and is integral to enjoying FPS games and traditional software that require an analogue stick. The Nunchuk, too, houses accelerometers, but cannot be used as a pointer. This allows for some cool games such as boxing, wherein the Nunchuk can act as your left glove, and the Wiimote as your right glove, and you can box onscreen as you would in real life. Boxing, as part of Wii Sports, allows you to throw punches and even allows you to evade your opponent’s punches by swaying your body left and right!
    Another unique element to the Wii remote is the speaker. Of passable quality, the speaker does add a bit of aural feedback to a game: for example, it can output the sound of ball hitting racquet in a tennis game, the sound of a gun shooting and reloading in an FPS, or the sound of you reeling in your line in a fishing game. This apart, the Wiimote has the usual force feedback for a more tactile experience.

    Finally, the Wiimote comes with 4 KB of onboard memory. This is used to store a user’s personal settings and his or her personal avatar, dubbed Mii, of course, which can be created using the console.
    Saturday, March 17, 2007 6:27 AM
  • Channel Wii
    Nintendo extended the Wii Remote’s TV metaphor to the realm of “channels.” As hardware meant for the entire family, Wii offers more than just games: each avenue of entertainment/information is presented as a thumbnail channel by the Wii. Apart from the Disc Channel, where you can play both Wii and GameCube titles, Wii has the Mii Channel where you can create avatars of yourself (which later appear in some games), a News Channel, a Forecast Channel, a Photo Channel, a Wii Shop Channel, an Internet Channel, and channels for each Virtual Console title.

    While most of these channels are self-explanatory, notable among them are the Photo Channel, which displays your camera’s photos and movies via an SD slot on the Wii. The Photo Channel also allows you to do some rudimentary editing to your pictures and videos, create slideshows, and play MP3 music to a slideshow. The Internet Channel is essentially the Opera Web browser optimised for the Wii and TV screen display (note that the maximum resolution the Wii can display in is 480p, or 720 x 480).

    The Wii Shop is where you can buy additional games or content for your purchased games: the Wii will be able to play games from several old consoles, under its so-called Virtual Console feature—the NES, the SNES, the N64, the Mega Drive/Genesis, the TurboGrafx-16, the Commodore 64, and perhaps others not yet announced. You will also be able to purchase several brand-new games as well.

    Most of these games will require you to purchase a “Classic Controller” peripheral. Each of these games will cost certain “Wii Points”—an NES title for 500 points, an N64 for 1000, a Mega Drive for 800, and so on—with 500 Wii Points being equivalent to $5.

    Games downloaded from the Wii Store will appear as Virtual Console channels (a channel each for each game by default, although they can be grouped together) and can either be stored on the Wii’s 512 MB of internal Flash memory or to an external SD card. The console will keep track of your purchases, so you can delete a purchased title and later download it for free. Each Virtual Console title will be locked to the Wii it has been purchased on; you cannot take these games on an SD card and play them on a friend’s Wii.

    ConnectiWiity
    Out of the box, the Wii can communicate wirelessly via 802.11b/g. You can otherwise separately purchase a USB-to-Ethernet dongle if you don’t have a wireless router. Nintendo hasn’t shared its online libraries with third parties, and online multiplayer support isn’t expected to arrive until early next year, at least from third parties. Meanwhile, two games announced—Mario Strikers Charged and Battalion Wars 2—support multiplayer over the Internet as well as locally. Battalion Wars 2, or BWii, will feature online assault, skirmish, co-op play, and four-player capture-the-flag.

    Apart from local and Internet connectivity, the Wii can also communicate with the Nintendo DS. It has been suggested that the DS’ touch screen will be used to interact with characters on the TV. At least one game—Pokémon Battle Revolution—has been noted as using this feature when it is launched later this year in Japan: not only can you import your Pokémon from the Diamond and Pearl DS version, you will be able to control the entire game using the DS alone. You can use the DS stylus to select attacks, targets, view status, switch out Pokémon, and even surrender. While the DS thus displays menus and stats, the Wii displays only the battle screens on your TV.

    Saturday, March 17, 2007 6:30 AM
  • While You Were Sleeping
    The Wii enters into a low-power state when not used, or switched off, much like a TV on standby. In this state the console can continue to communicate with the Internet. This always-on connectivity is called the WiiConnect24, and will be used to stream various data to your console while you sleep, such that when you next power on the system it has downloaded new maps, or weapons, or system/game updates overnight!

    Other features of the Wii include a Message Board, which allows you to leave messages for your family or to send them across the Internet. For example, the Board can notify your friends about any new games you might have purchased. The Message Board is built around a calendar, and allows you to trade photos and text messages with cell phone users. The Wii also keeps a log of the games you’ve played and the amount of time you’ve spent on each game. The Wii Message Board alongside WiiConnect24 will allow a game developer to send you custom messages for a new map or a weapon as it is downloaded to your console.

    The Wii is a brave vision, but perhaps an essential one for Nintendo. It favours aesthetics and simplicity over raw power; certainly a black sheep amidst the Xbox 360 and the PlayStation 3. Through Wii, Nintendo wants everybody to enjoy games and thus expand the market. In many ways this was the only way forward for the Japanese company. Only time will tell whether fortune indeed favours the brave, and if the Wii will see Nintendo sink to hell—or rise to heaven.

    Saturday, March 17, 2007 6:32 AM
  • too much text to read :) but a good one, nice work.
    Saturday, March 17, 2007 8:32 AM
  • yea... i know.. thats why i've reduced it to 3 parts.....
    Saturday, March 17, 2007 1:00 PM
  • yeah i know.. wii definately rocks.. nice info man..
    Saturday, March 17, 2007 1:55 PM
  • hey guys ...wats the most strikin feature in wii acoordin to you??
    Monday, March 19, 2007 2:22 PM
  • yes friend, you are absolutely right :) the controller is the best part of the console :) nothing else on earth can beat that controller at present :) it has started a new gen of playing games :)
    Tuesday, March 20, 2007 8:08 AM
  • yea....  the controller rocks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!..... tell me guys wat else do you like ....which is not listed over here...............

    will surely mark you people.....................

    Thursday, March 22, 2007 10:40 AM

All replies

  • The most striking feature of the Wii is doubtless its controller. Dubbed the Wii Remote and rechristened “Wiimote” by the Internet, the controller resembles a simplified TV remote—something everyone is familiar and comfortable with. The Wiimote can be waved as a sword, or swung as a bat or golf club; it can be cast as a fishing reel, or used as a steering wheel.

    The Wiimote gets its mojo from motion tracking: it can detect its own position and orientation via a conjunction of accelerometers and an infrared sensor. The accelerometers determine roll, pitch, yaw, and directional movements. These are then communicated to the console via Bluetooth. The Wiimote can also track its own position relative to the console: this is done via a thin, small sensor bar that can either sit above or below a TV set—the bar houses infrared lights that are tracked by a camera embedded in the Wiimote, much like an actual TV remote’s IR window. The Wiimote is thus able to act as a pointer on the TV screen, analogous to how a PC mouse works: small movements on the mouse pad are converted to mouse movements onscreen.
    A game made for the Wii may or may not make use of this pointer functionality—action FPS Red Steel does, while racing game Excite Truck doesn’t.

    When the Wiimote was designed, Shigeru Miyamoto wanted a more modular hardware, something that could suit multiple purposes at minimal cost. The Wiimote thus has an expansion port for accessories. The Nunchuk, one such accessory, comes bundled with the Wii and is integral to enjoying FPS games and traditional software that require an analogue stick. The Nunchuk, too, houses accelerometers, but cannot be used as a pointer. This allows for some cool games such as boxing, wherein the Nunchuk can act as your left glove, and the Wiimote as your right glove, and you can box onscreen as you would in real life. Boxing, as part of Wii Sports, allows you to throw punches and even allows you to evade your opponent’s punches by swaying your body left and right!
    Another unique element to the Wii remote is the speaker. Of passable quality, the speaker does add a bit of aural feedback to a game: for example, it can output the sound of ball hitting racquet in a tennis game, the sound of a gun shooting and reloading in an FPS, or the sound of you reeling in your line in a fishing game. This apart, the Wiimote has the usual force feedback for a more tactile experience.

    Finally, the Wiimote comes with 4 KB of onboard memory. This is used to store a user’s personal settings and his or her personal avatar, dubbed Mii, of course, which can be created using the console.
    Saturday, March 17, 2007 6:27 AM
  • Channel Wii
    Nintendo extended the Wii Remote’s TV metaphor to the realm of “channels.” As hardware meant for the entire family, Wii offers more than just games: each avenue of entertainment/information is presented as a thumbnail channel by the Wii. Apart from the Disc Channel, where you can play both Wii and GameCube titles, Wii has the Mii Channel where you can create avatars of yourself (which later appear in some games), a News Channel, a Forecast Channel, a Photo Channel, a Wii Shop Channel, an Internet Channel, and channels for each Virtual Console title.

    While most of these channels are self-explanatory, notable among them are the Photo Channel, which displays your camera’s photos and movies via an SD slot on the Wii. The Photo Channel also allows you to do some rudimentary editing to your pictures and videos, create slideshows, and play MP3 music to a slideshow. The Internet Channel is essentially the Opera Web browser optimised for the Wii and TV screen display (note that the maximum resolution the Wii can display in is 480p, or 720 x 480).

    The Wii Shop is where you can buy additional games or content for your purchased games: the Wii will be able to play games from several old consoles, under its so-called Virtual Console feature—the NES, the SNES, the N64, the Mega Drive/Genesis, the TurboGrafx-16, the Commodore 64, and perhaps others not yet announced. You will also be able to purchase several brand-new games as well.

    Most of these games will require you to purchase a “Classic Controller” peripheral. Each of these games will cost certain “Wii Points”—an NES title for 500 points, an N64 for 1000, a Mega Drive for 800, and so on—with 500 Wii Points being equivalent to $5.

    Games downloaded from the Wii Store will appear as Virtual Console channels (a channel each for each game by default, although they can be grouped together) and can either be stored on the Wii’s 512 MB of internal Flash memory or to an external SD card. The console will keep track of your purchases, so you can delete a purchased title and later download it for free. Each Virtual Console title will be locked to the Wii it has been purchased on; you cannot take these games on an SD card and play them on a friend’s Wii.

    ConnectiWiity
    Out of the box, the Wii can communicate wirelessly via 802.11b/g. You can otherwise separately purchase a USB-to-Ethernet dongle if you don’t have a wireless router. Nintendo hasn’t shared its online libraries with third parties, and online multiplayer support isn’t expected to arrive until early next year, at least from third parties. Meanwhile, two games announced—Mario Strikers Charged and Battalion Wars 2—support multiplayer over the Internet as well as locally. Battalion Wars 2, or BWii, will feature online assault, skirmish, co-op play, and four-player capture-the-flag.

    Apart from local and Internet connectivity, the Wii can also communicate with the Nintendo DS. It has been suggested that the DS’ touch screen will be used to interact with characters on the TV. At least one game—Pokémon Battle Revolution—has been noted as using this feature when it is launched later this year in Japan: not only can you import your Pokémon from the Diamond and Pearl DS version, you will be able to control the entire game using the DS alone. You can use the DS stylus to select attacks, targets, view status, switch out Pokémon, and even surrender. While the DS thus displays menus and stats, the Wii displays only the battle screens on your TV.

    Saturday, March 17, 2007 6:30 AM
  • While You Were Sleeping
    The Wii enters into a low-power state when not used, or switched off, much like a TV on standby. In this state the console can continue to communicate with the Internet. This always-on connectivity is called the WiiConnect24, and will be used to stream various data to your console while you sleep, such that when you next power on the system it has downloaded new maps, or weapons, or system/game updates overnight!

    Other features of the Wii include a Message Board, which allows you to leave messages for your family or to send them across the Internet. For example, the Board can notify your friends about any new games you might have purchased. The Message Board is built around a calendar, and allows you to trade photos and text messages with cell phone users. The Wii also keeps a log of the games you’ve played and the amount of time you’ve spent on each game. The Wii Message Board alongside WiiConnect24 will allow a game developer to send you custom messages for a new map or a weapon as it is downloaded to your console.

    The Wii is a brave vision, but perhaps an essential one for Nintendo. It favours aesthetics and simplicity over raw power; certainly a black sheep amidst the Xbox 360 and the PlayStation 3. Through Wii, Nintendo wants everybody to enjoy games and thus expand the market. In many ways this was the only way forward for the Japanese company. Only time will tell whether fortune indeed favours the brave, and if the Wii will see Nintendo sink to hell—or rise to heaven.

    Saturday, March 17, 2007 6:32 AM
  • too much text to read :) but a good one, nice work.
    Saturday, March 17, 2007 8:32 AM
  • yea... i know.. thats why i've reduced it to 3 parts.....
    Saturday, March 17, 2007 1:00 PM
  • yeah i know.. wii definately rocks.. nice info man..
    Saturday, March 17, 2007 1:55 PM
  • fine you are right
    Sunday, March 18, 2007 2:57 PM
  • hey guys ...wats the most strikin feature in wii acoordin to you??
    Monday, March 19, 2007 2:22 PM
  • nice articals....
    Tuesday, March 20, 2007 1:43 AM
  • yes friend, you are absolutely right :) the controller is the best part of the console :) nothing else on earth can beat that controller at present :) it has started a new gen of playing games :)
    Tuesday, March 20, 2007 8:08 AM
  • yea....  the controller rocks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!..... tell me guys wat else do you like ....which is not listed over here...............

    will surely mark you people.....................

    Thursday, March 22, 2007 10:40 AM