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Studying for MCPD RRS feed

  • Question

  • i'm finding it hard to study from MCTS Self-Paced Training Kit (Exam 70-511) , also i tried to read Microsoft C# book but still there's a lot of stuff that i don't know where they came from & i'm tired of searching for every single line that i don't understand (it's kind of boring ) . i'm looking for a book that need no prior experience in programming , that explain the types of statements , variables , functions , types of identifiers ...etc  , also a book that contain only the definitions of programming in visual studio or c programming.
    • Edited by Enginsale Friday, August 24, 2012 10:08 AM
    Friday, August 24, 2012 10:07 AM

Answers

  • Studying can be boring, especially if the end goal is not in sight.

    As a suggestion, if you want to motivate yourself, you may want to schedule your exam attempt three to four weeks from now. You should soon have that needed motiviation to cram up on the topics.

    I find that once my exam is scheduled, I have all kinds of motivation to study and not waste the exam fee. It is also good to get at least one exam under your belt (pass or fail) just so you know what to expect in the testing procedures as well for exam exposure. If something comes up and completely blocks you from studying you can always reschedule as long as it is at least 48 hours before the scheduled exam.

    A guy I work with has written a great book on C#. Check out "Pro C# 2010 and the .NET 4 Platform."
    http://www.amazon.com/2010-NET-Platform-Andrew-Troelsen/dp/1430225491/

    It is smart to have multiple resources (books, web sites, etc.) when learning new topics.

    Good luck to you and don't give up!


    Best wishes, Davin Mickelson

    Friday, August 24, 2012 1:20 PM
    Answerer
  • Greetings,

    The self-paced training kits do a great job of covering the breadth and depth of topics covered in each exam. Perhaps it is too soon for that book for you. I keep a list of books that I like and offer the list to students in my classes.  One book that I often suggest to students newer to programming is: http://www.amazon.com/Introducing-Visual-Experts-Voice-ebook/dp/B004EPYYRM/ref=sr_1_23?ie=UTF8&qid=1345814386&sr=8-23&keywords=introduction+to+C%23

    This Apress title should cover all of the things you mention and is a much easier read than the training kits. Do make sure that you have experience using the products before attempting the exams. The labs in the self-paced training kits will help give you the experience you need.  Please let me know if you have more questions.

    Thanks and Good Luck!


    Please do not forget to click “Vote as Helpful” if any post helps you and "Mark as Answer”if it solves the issue.

    Friday, August 24, 2012 1:22 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi Enginsale,

    Thanks for posting. You didn't explicitly state your programming background, for example, whether you're totally new to programming, new to object-oriented programming, or just new to C#, but from your question I will assume you're new to programming.

    To successfully complete the 70-511 exam, you will need a firm command of either VB (Visual Basic) or C# and the Visual Studio 2010 development environment. Without a firm command of either one of these languages, it will be pointless attempting the 70-511 exam, because if you're unable to write and understand source code, developing applications using the .NET Framework will be impossible.

    Therefore, my suggestion would be to take a course in programming first, preferably C#, before starting to study for 70-511. You should probably also give yourself several additional months to gain some experience developing with the .NET Framework using Visual Studio before tackling the exam, since Microsoft recommends at least one year's development experience using Visual Studio.

    Although the books recommended by Davin and Mike above are excellent, they may be more suitable for intermediate programmers than for beginners. If you cannot take a C# programming class, I would then recommend the following introductory C# book by Dan Clarke, Beginning C# Object-Oriented Programming.

    It is a recent book, published in May, 2011, and updated for both .NET 4.0 and C# 4.0. It not only explains the language features you asked about in your question, but also teaches development using Visual Studio 2010, which is a requirement of the 70-511 exam. This book, coupled with some real-world programming experience, should provide the foundation you require to start making the most of the 70-511 Training Kit.

    I wish you every success on your path to certification.

    Friday, August 24, 2012 5:10 PM
  • Hi Enginsale,

    Thanks for the additional information. This clarifies things quite a bit.

    I believe what you're saying is that you need to start at the beginning, and I know the perfect book to start you off. It's called Code: The Hidden Language of Computer Hardware and Software, by Charles Petzold, and it carefully explains everything you need to know about computer systems before you start programming.

    "Code" is a quick and easy read, but is one of the most enlightening books you'll ever encounter. Among other things, it discusses number systems, logic gates, microprocessors, memory, machine code, and programming languages, plus all the things you asked about above.

    "Code" will lay the foundation for your future adventures in programming, and when you've finished it, you'll be ready to start your first programming language since you'll have a better understanding of what you'll be doing and why.

    If your next step is learning C#, then I know of no easier introduction than Introduction to C# Joes to Pros, by Peter Bako. This is an even gentler introduction to C# than the book I recommended earlier, but, unlike the first book, this text does not discuss the .NET Framework, which is why I didn't recommend it earlier. However, this book excels as an introductory C# language tutorial, which is why I recommend it now.

    There are many more resources I'd be happy to share with you, but I think the two books above form a good starting point at this stage. Finally, if your goal is to pass the 70-511 exam, I would suggest that you not attempt it until you've developed your C# programming skills sufficiently to do it justice.

    I wish you well in your endeavors.

    Saturday, August 25, 2012 3:13 AM
  • Please keep in mind that you do not have to learn C to learn C#. As a matter of fact, C# is a lot easier to work with than C because there are no pointers. C# applications automatically clean up their own memory usage. There are no pointers, no assembly language, no machine language, no hex values, and Visual Studio (the code editor) calls the compiler for you when you build your project.

    There are a lot of free C# tutorials available for beginners.
    Check these out from a Bing search: http://www.bing.com/search?q=C%23+Beginning+Tutorial&FORM=R5FD

    Microsoft's C# tutorials: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa288436(v=VS.71).aspx

    Check out these videos: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio//bb798022.aspx

    Hopefully, you have access to a version of Visual Studio 2010 - even the freely available Visual C# Express edition.
    Download C# Express here: http://www.microsoft.com/visualstudio/en-us/products/2010-editions/visual-csharp-express

    The primary help file for C# is free and online. It's called Microsoft Developer Network (MSDN) and is available here:
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/hh388566.aspx

    Good luck!


    Best wishes, Davin Mickelson

    Saturday, August 25, 2012 6:15 AM
    Answerer

All replies

  • Studying can be boring, especially if the end goal is not in sight.

    As a suggestion, if you want to motivate yourself, you may want to schedule your exam attempt three to four weeks from now. You should soon have that needed motiviation to cram up on the topics.

    I find that once my exam is scheduled, I have all kinds of motivation to study and not waste the exam fee. It is also good to get at least one exam under your belt (pass or fail) just so you know what to expect in the testing procedures as well for exam exposure. If something comes up and completely blocks you from studying you can always reschedule as long as it is at least 48 hours before the scheduled exam.

    A guy I work with has written a great book on C#. Check out "Pro C# 2010 and the .NET 4 Platform."
    http://www.amazon.com/2010-NET-Platform-Andrew-Troelsen/dp/1430225491/

    It is smart to have multiple resources (books, web sites, etc.) when learning new topics.

    Good luck to you and don't give up!


    Best wishes, Davin Mickelson

    Friday, August 24, 2012 1:20 PM
    Answerer
  • Greetings,

    The self-paced training kits do a great job of covering the breadth and depth of topics covered in each exam. Perhaps it is too soon for that book for you. I keep a list of books that I like and offer the list to students in my classes.  One book that I often suggest to students newer to programming is: http://www.amazon.com/Introducing-Visual-Experts-Voice-ebook/dp/B004EPYYRM/ref=sr_1_23?ie=UTF8&qid=1345814386&sr=8-23&keywords=introduction+to+C%23

    This Apress title should cover all of the things you mention and is a much easier read than the training kits. Do make sure that you have experience using the products before attempting the exams. The labs in the self-paced training kits will help give you the experience you need.  Please let me know if you have more questions.

    Thanks and Good Luck!


    Please do not forget to click “Vote as Helpful” if any post helps you and "Mark as Answer”if it solves the issue.

    Friday, August 24, 2012 1:22 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi Enginsale,

    Thanks for posting. You didn't explicitly state your programming background, for example, whether you're totally new to programming, new to object-oriented programming, or just new to C#, but from your question I will assume you're new to programming.

    To successfully complete the 70-511 exam, you will need a firm command of either VB (Visual Basic) or C# and the Visual Studio 2010 development environment. Without a firm command of either one of these languages, it will be pointless attempting the 70-511 exam, because if you're unable to write and understand source code, developing applications using the .NET Framework will be impossible.

    Therefore, my suggestion would be to take a course in programming first, preferably C#, before starting to study for 70-511. You should probably also give yourself several additional months to gain some experience developing with the .NET Framework using Visual Studio before tackling the exam, since Microsoft recommends at least one year's development experience using Visual Studio.

    Although the books recommended by Davin and Mike above are excellent, they may be more suitable for intermediate programmers than for beginners. If you cannot take a C# programming class, I would then recommend the following introductory C# book by Dan Clarke, Beginning C# Object-Oriented Programming.

    It is a recent book, published in May, 2011, and updated for both .NET 4.0 and C# 4.0. It not only explains the language features you asked about in your question, but also teaches development using Visual Studio 2010, which is a requirement of the 70-511 exam. This book, coupled with some real-world programming experience, should provide the foundation you require to start making the most of the 70-511 Training Kit.

    I wish you every success on your path to certification.

    Friday, August 24, 2012 5:10 PM
  • i'm a mechanical engineer so i have no prior experience in programming , i would like if you recommend books & websites for absolute beginners , i know learning programming takes time & i'm very patient but i would like to feel some type of accomplishment since i've been reading couple of books about programming but i can't seem to understand them since they just jump into the subject without even identifying the fundamentals of programming .

    The Fundamentals i would like to know is binary , decimal , hexadecimal , machine language , assembly language , assignment statements , pointers , syntax , algorithms , compilers ...etc , a simple introduction to computer programming would help me understand the foundation of software programming also if there's a book with definitions only ( a dictionary ) that i could use when i can't understand the meaning of a word it will be much appreciated.

    Saturday, August 25, 2012 2:11 AM
  • Hi Enginsale,

    Thanks for the additional information. This clarifies things quite a bit.

    I believe what you're saying is that you need to start at the beginning, and I know the perfect book to start you off. It's called Code: The Hidden Language of Computer Hardware and Software, by Charles Petzold, and it carefully explains everything you need to know about computer systems before you start programming.

    "Code" is a quick and easy read, but is one of the most enlightening books you'll ever encounter. Among other things, it discusses number systems, logic gates, microprocessors, memory, machine code, and programming languages, plus all the things you asked about above.

    "Code" will lay the foundation for your future adventures in programming, and when you've finished it, you'll be ready to start your first programming language since you'll have a better understanding of what you'll be doing and why.

    If your next step is learning C#, then I know of no easier introduction than Introduction to C# Joes to Pros, by Peter Bako. This is an even gentler introduction to C# than the book I recommended earlier, but, unlike the first book, this text does not discuss the .NET Framework, which is why I didn't recommend it earlier. However, this book excels as an introductory C# language tutorial, which is why I recommend it now.

    There are many more resources I'd be happy to share with you, but I think the two books above form a good starting point at this stage. Finally, if your goal is to pass the 70-511 exam, I would suggest that you not attempt it until you've developed your C# programming skills sufficiently to do it justice.

    I wish you well in your endeavors.

    Saturday, August 25, 2012 3:13 AM
  • is it better to learn c# after reading " code : the hidden language of computer hardware and software " or learn c then c# , also does this book talk about libraries & is there any book with definitions only that i could use as a reference ?

    also is there another book than "  Introduction to C# Joes to Pros " since i can't find it at any book store at my country except amazon

    thanks in advanced


    • Edited by Enginsale Saturday, August 25, 2012 4:19 AM
    Saturday, August 25, 2012 4:10 AM
  • Please keep in mind that you do not have to learn C to learn C#. As a matter of fact, C# is a lot easier to work with than C because there are no pointers. C# applications automatically clean up their own memory usage. There are no pointers, no assembly language, no machine language, no hex values, and Visual Studio (the code editor) calls the compiler for you when you build your project.

    There are a lot of free C# tutorials available for beginners.
    Check these out from a Bing search: http://www.bing.com/search?q=C%23+Beginning+Tutorial&FORM=R5FD

    Microsoft's C# tutorials: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa288436(v=VS.71).aspx

    Check out these videos: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio//bb798022.aspx

    Hopefully, you have access to a version of Visual Studio 2010 - even the freely available Visual C# Express edition.
    Download C# Express here: http://www.microsoft.com/visualstudio/en-us/products/2010-editions/visual-csharp-express

    The primary help file for C# is free and online. It's called Microsoft Developer Network (MSDN) and is available here:
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/hh388566.aspx

    Good luck!


    Best wishes, Davin Mickelson

    Saturday, August 25, 2012 6:15 AM
    Answerer