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Home Server - Domain server RRS feed

  • Question

  • I think a great feature will be to enable the home Server to be a Domain/Active Directory.

    This will ease the management of users, passwords, priviliges. Working with Home Server require to manage the users twice, both on the clients windows and on the home server. This also creates a security hole since two machines has the same user and same password.

    Best,

    Ido Samuelson

    Thursday, March 8, 2007 3:20 PM

All replies

  • while I know this is something that a lot of people would like to see (including me) I don't believe it's likely to happen for a couple of reasons. First, properly configuring and maintaining an AD isn't a trivial task, and WHS seems targeted for the average home user who will want to plug it in and just use it.

    Second, Microsoft already has an entry level server OS which includes AD: SBS. An individual knowlegable and enthusiastic enough to really want AD (and Exchange, and the other capabilities that are part of SBS) will probably not be satisfied with just WHS + AD. By the time you add everything else on, you've got SBS anyway.
    Thursday, March 8, 2007 8:47 PM
    Moderator
  • This is correct. However the average user will have problem maintaining the user/password match on both client and server machines.

    What I was thinking about is to create a service on top of AD to auto migrate the current client user to the AD's one, farther auto join the client machine to the domain.

    This way you will solve other problems like the remote access, which can now be enabled by the group policy.

    Otherwise I see no point of having the home server. I can use a XP that does the same thing.

    Friday, March 9, 2007 5:12 PM
  • The WHS Connector includes a tool to manage passwords on the home PC and WHS. If, for example, you change your password on a home PC, you'll shortly be prompted by the connector to synchronize your passwords between WHS and the PC. You have a choice of directions: you can sync from the home PC to WHS (pushing the password to WHS) or you can sync from WHS to the PC (pulling the password down to the local PC).
    Friday, March 9, 2007 6:34 PM
    Moderator
  • I don't think it is good enough.
    Friday, March 9, 2007 9:59 PM
  • For most people AD would be entirely too complicated to set up and would be overkill for most applications. Also, if AD were included what would stop small businesses from buying WHS instead of SBS especially considering WHS will substantially cheaper than SBS?
    Saturday, March 10, 2007 7:04 PM
  • While technically spoken tying in the home systems as near as possible into the WHS (e.g. AD, Policies, DNS, backup...) looks like a good idea. Why ever, this is leaving the corporate notebooks used at home as the extended office alone, or does create interferecnes nobody really wants.

    Biggest concern of the hardware manufacturers deciding between Linux based NAS and Windows Home Server is COST:

    • Hardware (CPU, RAM, storage for the OS like Flash, DOM, or disk)
    • Software integration
    • simple addition of unique selling points beyond the pure hardware

    With WHS, the minimum requirements are about four, eight or even many times higher then what is commonly in place on common NAS products in the market.

    Adding CPU or memory intensive tasks or applications is - even with the "single thread backup" - a major concern on resources - or is directly influencing the end user price of the packaged WHS appliance.


     

    Sunday, March 11, 2007 2:35 PM
  •  Kurt A. Schumacher wrote:

    While technically spoken tying in the home systems as near as possible into the WHS (e.g. AD, Policies, DNS, backup...) looks like a good idea. Why ever, this is leaving the corporate notebooks used at home as the extended office alone, or does create interferecnes nobody really wants.

    Biggest concern of the hardware manufacturers deciding between Linux based NAS and Windows Home Server is COST:

    • Hardware (CPU, RAM, storage for the OS like Flash, DOM, or disk)
    • Software integration
    • simple addition of unique selling points beyond the pure hardware

    With WHS, the minimum requirements are about four, eight or even many times higher then what is commonly in place on common NAS products in the market.

    Adding CPU or memory intensive tasks or applications is - even with the "single thread backup" - a major concern on resources - or is directly influencing the end user price of the packaged WHS appliance.




    The main difference between WHS and any linux based server is much more than cost.  If my mom were to install WHS, it would be feasable.  She does not need to know how to do DHCP, Domain names, or anything.  It just works.  With a linux based server, she needs to have a more technical understanding of how it works, and what types of things she wants implimented.  Heck, she doesnt even know WHAT streaming media IS!

    I think that domain name servers are better left to SBS, much like domain names were left to Windows XP pro, instead of the home editions.  I doubt that home users will have to plug in and out that many computers (or care about such things) enough to warrent the integration of domain name or DHCP.

    Thats my 2 cents :D
    Monday, March 12, 2007 12:25 AM
  • Not to sound acerbic, but I really don't think most people's parents could handle integrating WHS into their home network.  I believe most would be stumped at the step where they'd have to ensure that their PCs had the same user accounts and passwords (big challenge here as most people's home PCs don't have password-protected accounts).  The problem I find with not-so-technical users is that anything requiring more than 2 steps into unfamiliar territory is infeasible, even with a lot of hand holding it's pretty frustrating.  "Knows Enough To Be Dangerous" is also going to be a challenging demographic; older folks who like to challenge your authoritah when you're trying to hold their hand through something, or become upset with you when the solution fails.  Linux-based solutions like FreeNAS are simple to use, although I'm sure most semi/non-technical people would get confused by configuring RAID arrays and mounting them.  Although it is web-based and fairly simple to accomplish, I suspect even many "Power" users would fumble through it a few times before getting it right.  I've also read that ClarkConnect is an easy solution, but haven't tried it myself.
    Monday, March 12, 2007 1:07 AM
  • And also AD isn't too useful at home - a lot of people run XP Home, Vista Home Basic and Vista Home Premium - these cannot be added to domains! Only XP Pro, Vista Business and Vista Ultimate can be added to domains for a domain logon.
    Monday, March 12, 2007 9:42 AM