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Question about slsvc RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello everyone. 

     

    I was just curious. Once Windows has been installed, validated and registered with Microsoft... Why is it necessary to keep slsvc running? It takes up nearly 8mb of ram and serves no apparent purpose except giving Microsoft the warm and fuzzies. My computer ran fine with it turned off for several days, until Microsoft Security Essentials alerted me that my copy of Windows was "invalid". When I tracked down the issue, I realized it was because I had turned off slsvc. Are they afraid that a once valid installation will suddenly become invalid? That's ridiculous. 

    Thursday, December 9, 2010 1:18 AM

Answers

  • "Behelit123" wrote in message news:38854227-48ec-4e3a-a1c2-0c5cd03d14d5...

    Hello everyone. 

     

    I was just curious. Once Windows has been installed, validated and registered with Microsoft... Why is it necessary to keep slsvc running? It takes up nearly 8mb of ram and serves no apparent purpose except giving Microsoft the warm and fuzzies. My computer ran fine with it turned off for several days, until Microsoft Security Essentials alerted me that my copy of Windows was "invalid". When I tracked down the issue, I realized it was because I had turned off slsvc. Are they afraid that a once valid installation will suddenly become invalid? That's ridiculous. 


    slsvc runs at random times roughly every three days to check that files involved in the licensing system haven't been tampered with, and to check that the license is still valid. Licenses can become invalid for a number of reasons, including
    1) file tampering
    2) moving the OS to a 'new computer'
    3) being reported lost, stolen, or abused.
    4) being used outside their  allowed geographic area
    4) expiry

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by Behelit123 Thursday, December 9, 2010 12:34 PM
    Thursday, December 9, 2010 5:12 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • A Windows product key can be reported lost, stolen or misused.  That is why periodic a WGA check is made.
    Carey Frisch
    Thursday, December 9, 2010 3:15 AM
    Moderator
  • "Behelit123" wrote in message news:38854227-48ec-4e3a-a1c2-0c5cd03d14d5...

    Hello everyone. 

     

    I was just curious. Once Windows has been installed, validated and registered with Microsoft... Why is it necessary to keep slsvc running? It takes up nearly 8mb of ram and serves no apparent purpose except giving Microsoft the warm and fuzzies. My computer ran fine with it turned off for several days, until Microsoft Security Essentials alerted me that my copy of Windows was "invalid". When I tracked down the issue, I realized it was because I had turned off slsvc. Are they afraid that a once valid installation will suddenly become invalid? That's ridiculous. 


    slsvc runs at random times roughly every three days to check that files involved in the licensing system haven't been tampered with, and to check that the license is still valid. Licenses can become invalid for a number of reasons, including
    1) file tampering
    2) moving the OS to a 'new computer'
    3) being reported lost, stolen, or abused.
    4) being used outside their  allowed geographic area
    4) expiry

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by Behelit123 Thursday, December 9, 2010 12:34 PM
    Thursday, December 9, 2010 5:12 AM
    Moderator
  • I see. Though it would make more sense to invoke it periodically rather than persistently. If it only needs to check twice a week or so, or when manually checked... Why not invoke it only when required? LOL Whole operating systems from the mid-1990's could be fired up on 8mb of ram...
    Thursday, December 9, 2010 12:44 PM