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Windows Activation Technologies thinks my computer is not running genuine Windows RRS feed

  • Question

  • Just a few days ago, started getting this pop-up.  Of course, I'm running the original OEM Windows 7 that came with my Sony VAIO, so I have no intention of purchasing another copy of Win7, and I don't want to reinstall from the partition on the VAIO and have to reinstall other stuff and risk my data when this pop-up is the only issue I'm having.  So how do I get my computer to stop calling me a pirate?  Diagnostic report follows:

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    Windows Validation Data-->

    Validation Code: 0x8004FE21
    Cached Online Validation Code: 0x0
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-VGV87-C7XPK-CGKHQ
    Windows Product Key Hash: sdEjrEJjW0FuXAhegYxl8GAkBYg=
    Windows Product ID: 00359-OEM-8992687-00016
    Windows Product ID Type: 2
    Windows License Type: OEM SLP
    Windows OS version: 6.1.7600.2.00010300.0.0.003
    ID: {B252D55B-67DD-46A5-B6F3-4B97FB470BB2}(1)
    Is Admin: Yes
    TestCab: 0x0
    LegitcheckControl ActiveX: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Product Name: Windows 7 Home Premium
    Architecture: 0x00000009
    Build lab: 7600.win7_gdr.101026-1503
    TTS Error:
    Validation Diagnostic:
    Resolution Status: N/A

    Vista WgaER Data-->
    ThreatID(s): N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    Windows XP Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    File Exists: No
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAExec.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAAddin.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 100 Genuine
    Microsoft Office Publisher 2007 - 100 Genuine
    Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 - 100 Genuine
    OGA Version: N/A, 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Office Diagnostics: B4D0AA8B-604-645_025D1FF3-364-80041010_025D1FF3-229-80041010_025D1FF3-230-1_025D1FF3-517-80040154_025D1FF3-237-80040154_025D1FF3-238-2_025D1FF3-244-80070002_025D1FF3-258-3_E2AD56EA-765-d003_E2AD56EA-766-0_E2AD56EA-134-80004005

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files (x86)\Mozilla Firefox\firefox.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{B252D55B-67DD-46A5-B6F3-4B97FB470BB2}</UGUID><Version>1.9.0027.0</Version><OS>6.1.7600.2.00010300.0.0.003</OS><Architecture>x64</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-CGKHQ</PKey><PID>00359-OEM-8992687-00016</PID><PIDType>2</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-1132091199-2213939147-3527123860</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>Sony Corporation</Manufacturer><Model>VPCCW21FX</Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>American Megatrends Inc.</Manufacturer><Version>R0170Y7</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="6"/><Date>20100514000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>DFBA3607018400FC</HWID><UserLCID>0409</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Eastern Standard Time(GMT-05:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM><OEMID>Sony</OEMID><OEMTableID>VAIO</OEMTableID></OEM><GANotification/></MachineData><Software><Office><Result>100</Result><Products><Product GUID="{91120000-0019-0000-0000-0000000FF1CE}"><LegitResult>100</LegitResult><Name>Microsoft Office Publisher 2007</Name><Ver>12</Ver><Val>1B9EB4684A47F0E</Val><Hash>3y9e4XdJqEMqPrZ5j3Ce11GjrjY=</Hash><Pid>81613-903-9068282-62769</Pid><PidType>1</PidType></Product><Product GUID="{91120000-002F-0000-0000-0000000FF1CE}"><LegitResult>100</LegitResult><Name>Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007</Name><Ver>12</Ver><Val>2A8605F88DC7740</Val><Hash>vZcxwT1mTT5NeNJLREn3HO+fepQ=</Hash><Pid>81602-928-4005327-68679</Pid><PidType>1</PidType></Product></Products><Applications><App Id="16" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="18" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="19" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="1B" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="A1" Version="12" Result="100"/></Applications></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

    Spsys.log Content: 0x80070002

    Licensing Data-->
    Software licensing service version: 6.1.7600.16385

    Name: Windows(R) 7, HomePremium edition
    Description: Windows Operating System - Windows(R) 7, OEM_SLP channel
    Activation ID: d2c04e90-c3dd-4260-b0f3-f845f5d27d64
    Application ID: 55c92734-d682-4d71-983e-d6ec3f16059f
    Extended PID: 00359-00178-926-800016-02-1033-7600.0000-3452009
    Installation ID: 019865733371114423741152663456534654584566054675590403
    Processor Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88338
    Machine Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88339
    Use License URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88341
    Product Key Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88340
    Partial Product Key: CGKHQ
    License Status: Licensed
    Remaining Windows rearm count: 3
    Trusted time: 3/11/2011 10:48:21 PM

    Windows Activation Technologies-->
    HrOffline: 0x8004FE21
    HrOnline: N/A
    HealthStatus: 0x0000000000000020
    Event Time Stamp: 3:11:2011 22:52
    ActiveX: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    Admin Service: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    HealthStatus Bitmask Output:
    Tampered File: %systemroot%\system32\sppc.dll|sppc.dll.mui


    HWID Data-->
    HWID Hash Current: NAAAAAEAAwABAAEAAAACAAAAAwABAAEA6GHOry44wE4QqBZThFq+fiia4mrCJR53fnBcXQ==

    OEM Activation 1.0 Data-->
    N/A

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->
    BIOS valid for OA 2.0: yes
    Windows marker version: 0x20001
    OEMID and OEMTableID Consistent: yes
    BIOS Information:
      ACPI Table Name OEMID Value OEMTableID Value
      APIC   Sony  VAIO
      FACP   Sony  VAIO
      HPET   Sony  VAIO
      MCFG   Sony  VAIO
      SLIC   Sony  VAIO
      SSDT   Sony  VAIO
      SSDT   Sony  VAIO

     

     

    Saturday, March 12, 2011 3:58 AM

Answers

  • Hello J W Stuart,

      While I appreciate your willingness to assist, please make sure you understand the difference between an OEM SLP Key and an COA SLP key before (incorrectly) telling a customer that they were sold a pirated copy of Windows.

     

    tb19 and Cbarnhorst have already identified the issue with Bill368's Windows.

    Windows Activation Technologies-->
    HrOffline: 0x8004FE21
    HrOnline: N/A
    HealthStatus: 0x0000000000000020
    Event Time Stamp: 3:12:2011 09:47
    ActiveX: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    Admin Service: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    HealthStatus Bitmask Output:
    Tampered File: %systemroot%\system32\sppc.dll|sppc.dll.mui

    The highlighted error code means "Selfheal failure" which means Windows detected one of it's protected files has been modified or has become corrupt. Windows attempted to repair the file automatically but for some reason the repair operation failed.

    The highlighted Tampered File line tells us the name and location of the file causing the issue.  In this case, the file causing the problem is either sppc.dll or it's language pack equivalent sppc.dll.mui .

    The resolution to this issue is to get the file repaired or replaced with a known-good copy.

     

    At this point the Bill368 has tried the sfc /scannow command which did not resolve the issue.

    Next step:

    Repairing Windows using System Restore:

    1) Click the Start button
    2) In the Start Search field, type: System Restore and hit “Enter”
    3) Select "Choose Different Restore Point", Put a check in the box that says "Show restore points older than 5 days", select the restore point that corresponds to the date Before you first noticed the issue.
    4) Click the "Next" button.
    5) Reboot and see if that resolves the issue.

     

    If that does not resolve the issue, I would recommend contacting Windows assisted support at one of the below URLs, for further assistance.

    North America: http://support.microsoft.com/contactus/cu_sc_genadv_master?ws=support&ws=support#tab4

    Outside North America:
    http://support.microsoft.com/contactus/?ws=support#tab0


    Darin MS
    Monday, March 14, 2011 9:49 PM

All replies

  • Tampered File: %systemroot%\system32\sppc.dll|sppc.dll.mui
    

     

    Click the start orb.

    Type cmd into the search.

    Right click cmd.exe and select to run as an Administrator.

    Type the following command: sfc  /scannow

    Wait for the process to finish and restart your system.

    Go to the Microsoft website and validate Windows.

     

    Saturday, March 12, 2011 4:16 AM
  • @tb19

    The link for the validation site is

    http://www.microsoft.com/genuine/validate/?hrOffline=0x8004fe21


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Saturday, March 12, 2011 5:21 AM
    Answerer
  • Thanks, guys!  Unfortunately, it's still not recognized as validated.  After running the scannow, I got back:

    "Windows Resource Protection found corrupt files but was unable to fix some of them."  Then indicated details were in windir\Logs\CBS\CBS.log

     

    Found what looks like that file in the Windows directory; there's a LOT of text in there, but I can try and paste it here if you want it.

     

     

     

    Saturday, March 12, 2011 1:53 PM
  • Post a new MGADiag report here.
    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Saturday, March 12, 2011 4:17 PM
    Answerer
  • Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    Windows Validation Data-->

    Validation Code: 0x8004FE21
    Cached Online Validation Code: 0x0
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-VGV87-C7XPK-CGKHQ
    Windows Product Key Hash: sdEjrEJjW0FuXAhegYxl8GAkBYg=
    Windows Product ID: 00359-OEM-8992687-00016
    Windows Product ID Type: 2
    Windows License Type: OEM SLP
    Windows OS version: 6.1.7600.2.00010300.0.0.003
    ID: {B252D55B-67DD-46A5-B6F3-4B97FB470BB2}(3)
    Is Admin: Yes
    TestCab: 0x0
    LegitcheckControl ActiveX: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Product Name: Windows 7 Home Premium
    Architecture: 0x00000009
    Build lab: 7600.win7_gdr.101026-1503
    TTS Error:
    Validation Diagnostic:
    Resolution Status: N/A

    Vista WgaER Data-->
    ThreatID(s): N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    Windows XP Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    File Exists: No
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAExec.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAAddin.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 100 Genuine
    Microsoft Office Publisher 2007 - 100 Genuine
    Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 - 100 Genuine
    OGA Version: N/A, 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Office Diagnostics: B4D0AA8B-604-645_025D1FF3-364-80041010_025D1FF3-229-80041010_025D1FF3-230-1_025D1FF3-517-80040154_025D1FF3-237-80040154_025D1FF3-238-2_025D1FF3-244-80070002_025D1FF3-258-3

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files (x86)\Mozilla Firefox\firefox.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{B252D55B-67DD-46A5-B6F3-4B97FB470BB2}</UGUID><Version>1.9.0027.0</Version><OS>6.1.7600.2.00010300.0.0.003</OS><Architecture>x64</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-CGKHQ</PKey><PID>00359-OEM-8992687-00016</PID><PIDType>2</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-1132091199-2213939147-3527123860</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>Sony Corporation</Manufacturer><Model>VPCCW21FX</Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>American Megatrends Inc.</Manufacturer><Version>R0170Y7</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="6"/><Date>20100514000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>DFBA3607018400FC</HWID><UserLCID>0409</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Eastern Standard Time(GMT-05:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM><OEMID>Sony</OEMID><OEMTableID>VAIO</OEMTableID></OEM><GANotification/></MachineData><Software><Office><Result>100</Result><Products><Product GUID="{91120000-0019-0000-0000-0000000FF1CE}"><LegitResult>100</LegitResult><Name>Microsoft Office Publisher 2007</Name><Ver>12</Ver><Val>1B9EB4684A47F0E</Val><Hash>3y9e4XdJqEMqPrZ5j3Ce11GjrjY=</Hash><Pid>81613-903-9068282-62769</Pid><PidType>1</PidType></Product><Product GUID="{91120000-002F-0000-0000-0000000FF1CE}"><LegitResult>100</LegitResult><Name>Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007</Name><Ver>12</Ver><Val>2A8605F88DC7740</Val><Hash>vZcxwT1mTT5NeNJLREn3HO+fepQ=</Hash><Pid>81602-928-4005327-68679</Pid><PidType>1</PidType></Product></Products><Applications><App Id="16" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="18" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="19" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="1B" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="A1" Version="12" Result="100"/></Applications></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

    Spsys.log Content: 0x80070002

    Licensing Data-->
    Software licensing service version: 6.1.7600.16385

    Name: Windows(R) 7, HomePremium edition
    Description: Windows Operating System - Windows(R) 7, OEM_SLP channel
    Activation ID: d2c04e90-c3dd-4260-b0f3-f845f5d27d64
    Application ID: 55c92734-d682-4d71-983e-d6ec3f16059f
    Extended PID: 00359-00178-926-800016-02-1033-7600.0000-3452009
    Installation ID: 019865733371114423741152663456534654584566054675590403
    Processor Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88338
    Machine Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88339
    Use License URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88341
    Product Key Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88340
    Partial Product Key: CGKHQ
    License Status: Licensed
    Remaining Windows rearm count: 3
    Trusted time: 3/14/2011 7:02:35 AM

    Windows Activation Technologies-->
    HrOffline: 0x8004FE21
    HrOnline: N/A
    HealthStatus: 0x0000000000000020
    Event Time Stamp: 3:12:2011 09:47
    ActiveX: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    Admin Service: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    HealthStatus Bitmask Output:
    Tampered File: %systemroot%\system32\sppc.dll|sppc.dll.mui


    HWID Data-->
    HWID Hash Current: NAAAAAEAAwABAAEAAAACAAAAAwABAAEA6GHOry44wE4QqBZThFq+fiia4mrCJR53fnBcXQ==

    OEM Activation 1.0 Data-->
    N/A

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->
    BIOS valid for OA 2.0: yes
    Windows marker version: 0x20001
    OEMID and OEMTableID Consistent: yes
    BIOS Information:
      ACPI Table Name    OEMID Value    OEMTableID Value
      APIC            Sony        VAIO
      FACP            Sony        VAIO
      HPET            Sony        VAIO
      MCFG            Sony        VAIO
      SLIC            Sony        VAIO
      SSDT            Sony        VAIO
      SSDT            Sony        VAIO


    Monday, March 14, 2011 11:03 AM
  • Windows Product Key: *****-*****-VGV87-C7XPK-CGKHQ

     

    Your product key in on a list of cracked/stolen Windows 7 product keys.

     

    J W Stuart: http://www.pagestart.com

     

    The above information is incorrect


    Never be afraid to ask. This forum has some of the best people in the world available to help.
    Monday, March 14, 2011 11:31 AM
  • Isn't that the sony oem slp key?
    Monday, March 14, 2011 12:29 PM
    Answerer
  • If my product key is on a list of cracked/stolen keys, then either whoever made the list made a mistake, or Sony is selling bootleg copies of Windows 7 on their retail machines, JW. 
    Monday, March 14, 2011 12:44 PM
  • george1009 is correct.  If the sony key were on anything but a sony it would indicate an exploit, but it is not being used that way.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Monday, March 14, 2011 1:29 PM
    Answerer
  • So you are saying that every Sony uses the exact same OEM product key sticker on the bottom of a laptop!

    How to Change Windows 7 Product Key
    http://www.sizzledcore.com/2009/10/26/how-to-change-windows-7-product-key/

    Also: http://www.blogsdna.com/2233/how-to-change-windows-7-product-key.htm

    Step by Step:
    Click on the Windows 7 Start Button
    Go to All Programs/Accessories
    Next right on Command Prompt and select “Run as Administrator” from the menu.
    Now type following at the command prompt:  slmgr.vbs -ipk  XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX  (where XXXXX-XXXXX-... is your key)
    Finally activate windows after changing the key, at the command prompt:  slmgr.vbs -ato


    Also:
    How do I check my Windows activation status on this computer:
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-vista/Activating-Windows-frequently-asked-questions

    To check your Windows activation status, do the following:

    1. Open System by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, clicking Control Panel, clicking System and Maintenance, and then clicking System.
    2. Under Windows activation, you can view your activation status. You can also change your product key by clicking Change product key.


    J W Stuart: http://www.pagestart.com

     

    <The above information is incorrect>


    Never be afraid to ask. This forum has some of the best people in the world available to help.
    • Edited by Darin Smith MS Monday, March 14, 2011 9:54 PM incorrect information
    Monday, March 14, 2011 4:55 PM
  • No the coa on the sticker is unique. The oem slp key is unique to the manufacturer and edition of windows. 

    It is used to self activate oem machines at time of manufacture. It is used in conjunction with the bios slic table. 

    Crap have to go so i can't point to a link right now . I've seen replies where Darin has a very good explaination of this. These oem slp keys are all over the internet because they are a necessary ingrediant in activation exploits.

    sorry for the crappy response.

    Monday, March 14, 2011 5:36 PM
    Answerer
  • JW, the OEM SLP key (internal key), system date, and manufacturer match up with the data in the BIOS (sony).  That is what george1009 is saying.  This system should have self-activated. 

    It is when there are inconsistencies between the system manufactured date (a date prior to Windows 7 rtm, for example), system manufacturer and BIOS slic manufacturer (a Dell SLIC on an HP box, for example) that an exploit may be in place.  The fact that a product key has been used in an OEM SLP exploit does not mean one is present everytime you see the key.  Of course you are going to see this sony key on a sony computer.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.

    Monday, March 14, 2011 6:01 PM
    Answerer
  • Hello J W Stuart,

      While I appreciate your willingness to assist, please make sure you understand the difference between an OEM SLP Key and an COA SLP key before (incorrectly) telling a customer that they were sold a pirated copy of Windows.

     

    tb19 and Cbarnhorst have already identified the issue with Bill368's Windows.

    Windows Activation Technologies-->
    HrOffline: 0x8004FE21
    HrOnline: N/A
    HealthStatus: 0x0000000000000020
    Event Time Stamp: 3:12:2011 09:47
    ActiveX: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    Admin Service: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    HealthStatus Bitmask Output:
    Tampered File: %systemroot%\system32\sppc.dll|sppc.dll.mui

    The highlighted error code means "Selfheal failure" which means Windows detected one of it's protected files has been modified or has become corrupt. Windows attempted to repair the file automatically but for some reason the repair operation failed.

    The highlighted Tampered File line tells us the name and location of the file causing the issue.  In this case, the file causing the problem is either sppc.dll or it's language pack equivalent sppc.dll.mui .

    The resolution to this issue is to get the file repaired or replaced with a known-good copy.

     

    At this point the Bill368 has tried the sfc /scannow command which did not resolve the issue.

    Next step:

    Repairing Windows using System Restore:

    1) Click the Start button
    2) In the Start Search field, type: System Restore and hit “Enter”
    3) Select "Choose Different Restore Point", Put a check in the box that says "Show restore points older than 5 days", select the restore point that corresponds to the date Before you first noticed the issue.
    4) Click the "Next" button.
    5) Reboot and see if that resolves the issue.

     

    If that does not resolve the issue, I would recommend contacting Windows assisted support at one of the below URLs, for further assistance.

    North America: http://support.microsoft.com/contactus/cu_sc_genadv_master?ws=support&ws=support#tab4

    Outside North America:
    http://support.microsoft.com/contactus/?ws=support#tab0


    Darin MS
    Monday, March 14, 2011 9:49 PM
  • My appologies Bill368 and Darin.

    J W Stuart


    Never be afraid to ask. This forum has some of the best people in the world available to help.
    Tuesday, March 15, 2011 1:01 PM
  • JW, It is very easy to be mislead When you see the product key on the report all over the pirate sites.

     

    courtesy Darin,

    Computers, which are built by large manufactures that come with Windows Pre-Installed, come with two (2) Product Keys:

    A)   OEM SLP: This key comes pre-installed in Windows, when it comes from the Factory. This key is geared to work with the OEM Bios Flag found only on that Manufacturer's computer hardware. So when Windows was installed using the OEM SLP key (at the factory) Windows looks at the motherboard and sees the proper OEM Bios Flag (for that Manufacturer and that version of Windows) and Self-Activates. (that's why you did not need to Activate your computer after you brought it home)

     

    B)    COA SLP: This is the Product key that you see on the sticker on the side (or bottom or sometimes in a laptop's battery compartment) of your computer. It is a valid product key, but should only be used in limited situations (such as this case when the OEM SLP key stops self-activating for whatever reason). The key must be activated by Phone.

    Hope this adds some clarity

    Tuesday, March 15, 2011 2:25 PM
    Answerer
  • I'm aware of the differences between the OEM and COA keys. I'm also aware of various BIOS cracks.

    What I was not aware of was that something as simple as a corrupt file could cause WAT to report the product as not genuine.

    J W Stuart


    Never be afraid to ask. This forum has some of the best people in the world available to help.
    Tuesday, March 15, 2011 4:48 PM
  • ok, once again I made a bad assumption. I'm still trying to figure out the corrupt file issues. I can recognize them but don't know the proper solutions.
    Tuesday, March 15, 2011 5:18 PM
    Answerer
  • So many files to get corrupted, so little time.  :)

    The system file checker is my bludgeon of choice but I don't know which files call for that and which don't.  Since most are system files it often works.  Even a blind squirrel finds the acorn sometimes.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Tuesday, March 15, 2011 5:23 PM
    Answerer
  • In this case SFC did not fix the file, but WAT had a fit.

    J. W. Stuart


    Never be afraid to ask. This forum has some of the best people in the world available to help.
    Tuesday, March 15, 2011 5:37 PM
  • Hello J W Stuart,

    Most if not all W7 files located in the system32 folder starting with "sp" are part of the Software Protection Platform, which as you might suspect is how Windows 7 protects and monitors itself for genuineness.

    When those files are out of whack, of course WAT is going to alert the user to that.

    Tuesday, March 15, 2011 6:09 PM
  • Hi Dan. IT Associates, geez I just connected the dots. I'm not all that far away from you.

    As you know Windows 7 does not perform a "Full" format during the install process, results in bad sectors not being mapped out in the MFT. That leaves some chance that one or more of these "sp" files could end up on a bad sector either during the install or during/after a defrag of the drive.

     


    Never be afraid to ask. This forum has some of the best people in the world available to help.
    Tuesday, March 15, 2011 8:14 PM