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My machine died and I can't use my COA on a fresh install. (Motherboard Replaced) RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have 3 machines here that have died and each had a COA attached to it. Two of the COA's are Windows XP Pro and the other is Windows 2000. Each machine came with a restore CD, but no Genuine Windows discs I can use to re-install Windows.

    I have two issues, which I consider to be the same problem.

    1. With the first two machines (desktops), I suffered a motherboard failure and I still have all the same hardware I used to have except for the motherboard and case. As I can't use the restore CD with the new motherboard due to the difference in drivers, I'm not able to use the COAs on the old cases with the XP CD I borrowed from a friend.

    2. The laptop I have has no hardware issues, but came with restore CD's which will work, but are filled with OEM rubbish that I simply don't want to install. I would prefer a fresh install that I can customise myself, but as the COA won't work with the same CD as above, I'm stranded.

    Is there anything I can do to be able to use these COA's on fresh installations? I'm happy to pay for new discs and replacement COA stickers and can even grind the old COA's off the cases and mail them in attached to bits of case. I just don't think it's fair that I have to re-purchase licences that I've already paid for..

    N.B. Would also like to upgrade the Windows 2000 licence to XP Pro and am happy to pay the upgrade cost.

    Friday, June 23, 2006 12:37 AM

Answers

  • Muddy,

    The XP license that affords the license holder the most flexibility is called a "full retail" license.  If you go to a major electronics retailer, it will be the one in the box with wording in the upper right corner that says "For PCs with Windows 95 or PCs without an operating system, etc."

    This license allows you to install XP on any computer regardless of whether it came from its manufacturer with or without an OS, allows you to change hardware in any manner whatsoever, and it allows you to move that license to as many computers as you like, as long as its installed on one computer at a time.

    And as you may have guessed, this is the most expensive XP license.  The "normal" selling price here in the USA for a full retail XP Pro license is $299, $199 for XP Home.

    Friday, June 23, 2006 3:03 AM

All replies

  • The COA affixed to the PCs are only valid with the PC's recommended restore method.  If that is not possible, you'll need to purchase individual, conventional versions of Windows XP.
    Friday, June 23, 2006 1:27 AM
    Moderator
  • Thank you for taking the time to reply.

    I understand this might be the stance Microsoft is taking, but that's like saying your drivers licence is only valid with the vehicle you used to obtain your licence. If you buy a new car, you have to obtain a new licence. I strongly disagree, especially since this wasn't bought to my attention when I purchased the original licence with the machine. Had I known this at the time, I would have purchased a different licence.

    I've done nothing wrong, yet if this is true, I seem to be punished (by default) for needing to reinstall. I have the same CPU, RAM, Hard Drive, CD Rom, DVD Rom, Floppy Drive etc... so it's not like I upgraded. Some sympathy and/or goodwill would go a long way.

    Friday, June 23, 2006 1:38 AM
  • For support reasons, computer manufacturers create their own customized version of Windows that ties the license to the motherboard.  If you install a new motherboard not purchased from the computer manufacter, the OEM license is no longer valid.
    Friday, June 23, 2006 1:56 AM
    Moderator
  • So there's no upgrade or replacement path from this point, other than to purchase 3 new licences?

    ie: Can someone upgrade from OEM XP Pro or OEM Windows 2000 to "conventional" XP Pro at an upgrade price?

    Friday, June 23, 2006 2:03 AM
  • OEM COA's are specific to a manufacturer's PC. The EULA for OEM Products will state what will classify a system as an "OEM" if it is modified past a certain extent. I can't really speak for the OEM EULA, but there will be a provision in there revolving OEM license and computer modification.

     

    If you're using the same hardware, you should be able to use the same COA for that same PC hardware, however.

     

    -phil liu

    Friday, June 23, 2006 2:31 AM
  • Carey has already indicated that the motherboard replacement is enough to effect the OEM status of my machine. If this is the case, I wanted to know if there was an upgrade path from OEM XP Professional and OEM Windows 2000 Professional to what seems to be considered a "conventional" version of XP Professional, just in case this happens again.

    Also, I'm assuming that with this "conventional" license, I can upgrade some components of the machine without running in to the same issues.

    Friday, June 23, 2006 2:44 AM
  • There is no upgrade path.  I would suggest purchasing a "Full Retail Version" of Windows XP.  Retail versions permit all hardware changes, including a new motherboard.
    Friday, June 23, 2006 3:02 AM
    Moderator
  • Muddy,

    The XP license that affords the license holder the most flexibility is called a "full retail" license.  If you go to a major electronics retailer, it will be the one in the box with wording in the upper right corner that says "For PCs with Windows 95 or PCs without an operating system, etc."

    This license allows you to install XP on any computer regardless of whether it came from its manufacturer with or without an OS, allows you to change hardware in any manner whatsoever, and it allows you to move that license to as many computers as you like, as long as its installed on one computer at a time.

    And as you may have guessed, this is the most expensive XP license.  The "normal" selling price here in the USA for a full retail XP Pro license is $299, $199 for XP Home.

    Friday, June 23, 2006 3:03 AM
  • Thanks to everyone who replied. I really appreciate your time. I'm not at all happy about the outcome and will consider my options now that I know what's what.

    At best, I think it's pretty poor that there's no upgrade path for me and I'm not sure that I'll be buying new licences at this stage (out of anger). I will grind off the COA's before I throw the old cases away in the vein hope that someone who makes these rules finds their heart. I really feel this issue should have been made aware to me at the time of purchase. I admit some fault as I didn't read the EULA (It's HUGE and I wanted to play with my new toys), but this should be the responsibility of the vendor. A smaller increase in cost at the time of purchase would have saved me 3 complete licence re-purchases now. Maybe this is something you need educate vendors on to save future ill feeling toward your company.

    Friday, June 23, 2006 3:48 AM