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Wake On Lan? RRS feed

  • Question

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    Do I recall that WOL technology was going to be introduced into WHS, so client PC's could be woken from Power Off/Hibernate instead of Standby or other modes?  If so, where is it?

     

    Thursday, June 12, 2008 12:13 AM

Answers

  • no plans for Wake On Lan - there are several add-ins that enable this functionality.

     

    Thursday, June 12, 2008 12:16 AM
  • Without going into a lot of detail, WOL is an unreliable protocol in two senses. The first sense is the usability sense. You need proper support for it on the motherboard and the NIC, and you need everything to be properly configured. (There are modern motherboards that either don't support WOL at all, or only support "Wake on any packet" which is useless in this scenario.) You need software on the "client" (the PC waking the sleeping PC) to generate a magic packet, too. To work seamlessley, that software needs to be integrated with the operating system. All of these are relatively minor technical hurdles for the enthusiast, but Microsoft only has control of the software component.

     

    In addition, WOL uses UDP as the underlying protocol. UDP is an inherently unverifiable protocol. The only way to use WOL is to send a magic packet, then try accessing the remote resource until you succeed or give up. You may repeat the process several times before you see a response from the remote resource.

     

    So no Wake On LAN now, and likely not in the future.

    Thursday, June 12, 2008 11:53 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • no plans for Wake On Lan - there are several add-ins that enable this functionality.

     

    Thursday, June 12, 2008 12:16 AM
  • I for one am very dissappointed that WHS does not have this feature.  WOL would help make WHS a bit more "green".

    Thursday, June 12, 2008 2:41 AM
  • True. In fact any function that requires a file or service from another PC on the LAN could use WOL. The add-ins work fine, but that is not the same thing, as it uses manual intervention to WOL. Just think how proactive and forward looking WHS would be, to have WOL. After all, it doesn't take much coding to do it. I agree that not all PCs will WOL, at least let's have the function available to try. 

     

    Thursday, June 12, 2008 7:15 AM
  • I believe that hibernation or suspended mode is fairly low power consumption and is something that is supported in windows xp and vista.  Thus it is easily transferred to WHS.  WOL boots your computer from a cold boot which makes backups take longer then hibernation, enabling this feature might open up your system to security issues, and like you said it may not be easy to implement.  Considering the bios usually has to be setup right, something that the causal pc user may or may not be familiar with.
    Thursday, June 12, 2008 8:46 AM
  • WOL is not only for booting machines that are turned, of, but can also be used to wake computer from other power states (suspend, hibernate).
    Thursday, June 12, 2008 10:58 AM
  • I really agree, I can't understand why WHS does not support WOL out of the box. So much gain for so little effort. Don't stare yourselves blind on the "casual users", the enthusiasts are worth some time aswell!

    Thursday, June 12, 2008 11:13 AM
  • Without going into a lot of detail, WOL is an unreliable protocol in two senses. The first sense is the usability sense. You need proper support for it on the motherboard and the NIC, and you need everything to be properly configured. (There are modern motherboards that either don't support WOL at all, or only support "Wake on any packet" which is useless in this scenario.) You need software on the "client" (the PC waking the sleeping PC) to generate a magic packet, too. To work seamlessley, that software needs to be integrated with the operating system. All of these are relatively minor technical hurdles for the enthusiast, but Microsoft only has control of the software component.

     

    In addition, WOL uses UDP as the underlying protocol. UDP is an inherently unverifiable protocol. The only way to use WOL is to send a magic packet, then try accessing the remote resource until you succeed or give up. You may repeat the process several times before you see a response from the remote resource.

     

    So no Wake On LAN now, and likely not in the future.

    Thursday, June 12, 2008 11:53 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks Ken.  If you search for Wake on Lan in the Software or Suggestion forum you will see a similar response from me from about 4 or so months ago.   The team attempted to use Wake on LAN and quickly gave up for all of the reasons Ken cites.  Enthusiasts can use the various WOL add-ins ...

     

    Thursday, June 12, 2008 12:39 PM
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    Agreed all the above are true. BUT, there are many boards that don't support WHS, Vista, XP if we want to go down that route. For those that do, and in my little world, I haven't seen any modern boards that don't support WOL

     

    However, here's how I do it to WOL WHS over the internet.

    WHS has it IP perm'd and bound to MAC using router, in my case, a Vigor.

    I go here...

    http://www.rshut.com/products/wol/

    to WOL WHS.

     

    Once through the security hurdles, I use Autoexit for 2008 add-in to WOL LAN PC's. I have found Autoexit 2008 to be the best so far, to WOL from within WHS.

     

     

    Friday, June 13, 2008 3:21 AM
  • I don't understand why you guys are sayign this feature doesn't exist when it actually does...

    Right click the WHS console icon on the taskbar, and look, there is Wake Computer for Backup which does exactly that, uses WOL to backup clients.  It works too from my testing.
    Monday, June 16, 2008 10:55 PM