locked
So, why isn't there a way MS can ID a Win7 MSDN key and prompt the activator to see if he/she knows that is what they have? RRS feed

  • Question

  • So, not trying to be down on MS here...but, why can't Microsoft prompt the user who is activating Windows 7 that the activation is from a product key that is tied to an MSDN account?  It would seem that this is the best scenario for all parties involved since the user would have some idea that they are dealing with a fake very early on in the process.  This would seem to be the best way to spreak knowledge downward to the user who can then pursue the fraud perpetrator much earlier in the process.  The alternative, not knowing until 3 months later (?) seems to end up in a chance for the perp to get away clean.

    I had purchased a Windows 7 Ultimate off of Ebay too...checked out everything I could think of but it seemed legit...seems that Ebay took the transaction off so I can't even see the information anymore to pursue the fraud from my Ebay records....I keep all my emails though and can go back to pursue this from my own email records and will do so.

    I can't see blaming Microsoft for this problem, however, I do appeal to Microsoft to take a more active role in helping the general public in identifying that there is an issue by doing what I have suggested above...this seems to be a compromise that could work.  It does seem that MS has the ability to identify a product key that is tied to an MSDN subscription.

    I would hope that everybody is on board with the idea that we need collectively to seek better (and possible) remedies to the problem of continuing fraud.  And, it would seem that a company with all the intellual capital to develop world class operating systems and applications could add the prompt option with an interactive dialogue that would "help" in this case.

    Wednesday, February 2, 2011 3:10 AM

Answers

  • Q.  "Why can't Microsoft prompt the user who is activating Windows 7 that the activation is from a product key that is tied to an MSDN account?"

    A.  Because Micrsoft cannot determine if the MSDN product key has been illegally sold/distributed until it is actual illegally sold/distributed.

    True story that happened to an acquaintance of mine the other day:

    Someone broke inside his vehicle and stole a laptop computer and an envelope.  Within the stolen envelope were season tickets to his college's basketball home games.  He reported the tickets stolen and received replacements.  Went to the next home game and saw folks he didn't know sitting in his seats.  He asked them how that got tickets.  They said that he purchased them from someone who advertised them on  Craigslist.  Guess who didn't see the game that night and lost the money spent for the stolen tickets?

    Moral:  Do not purchase any software from any individual that advertises on web sites.  Purchase only from known and trusted sellers, such as the Microsoft Store.


    Carey Frisch
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Wednesday, February 2, 2011 11:51 PM
    Wednesday, February 2, 2011 4:08 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Q.  "Why can't Microsoft prompt the user who is activating Windows 7 that the activation is from a product key that is tied to an MSDN account?"

    A.  Because Micrsoft cannot determine if the MSDN product key has been illegally sold/distributed until it is actual illegally sold/distributed.

    True story that happened to an acquaintance of mine the other day:

    Someone broke inside his vehicle and stole a laptop computer and an envelope.  Within the stolen envelope were season tickets to his college's basketball home games.  He reported the tickets stolen and received replacements.  Went to the next home game and saw folks he didn't know sitting in his seats.  He asked them how that got tickets.  They said that he purchased them from someone who advertised them on  Craigslist.  Guess who didn't see the game that night and lost the money spent for the stolen tickets?

    Moral:  Do not purchase any software from any individual that advertises on web sites.  Purchase only from known and trusted sellers, such as the Microsoft Store.


    Carey Frisch
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Wednesday, February 2, 2011 11:51 PM
    Wednesday, February 2, 2011 4:08 AM
    Moderator
  • "zipperzz" wrote in message news:3c5f789b-38e0-469c-94c5-dd5bd9fadc6f...

    So, not trying to be down on MS here...but, why can't Microsoft prompt the user who is activating Windows 7 that the activation is from a product key that is tied to an MSDN account?  It would seem that this is the best scenario for all parties involved since the user would have some idea that they are dealing with a fake very early on in the process.  This would seem to be the best way to spreak knowledge downward to the user who can then pursue the fraud perpetrator much earlier in the process.  The alternative, not knowing until 3 months later (?) seems to end up in a chance for the perp to get away clean.

    .


    To an extent, I actually agree with you - but this type of fraud (certainly on this scale) did not emerge until after Win7 was in production, by which time it was to late to change anything this significant.
    I know that many legit MSDN clients would be VERY upset if the 'customer experience' on an MSDN product was different to the one on a Retail product, as they rely on that similarity for their lifeblood. This means that there's no realistic way to do this on the client side, and it would have to be a server-side change, with possibly a universal change in the customer experience.
    I suspect that the best thing going forward would be for the Activation servers to respond to each activation with a message stating exactly the license type, instead of just  a 'successful' message - but most people will click through this without even looking at it.

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Wednesday, February 2, 2011 8:04 AM
    Moderator
  • Hey Noel, your very last statement is RIGHT ON THE MONEY....sorry, not shouting as an expression of anger....it is more of excitement since this is exactly what I hope that MIcrosoft can do to help the end users do a self discovery on their product purchases.  Everybody benefits from knowing what type of license the activation server reports back....if it doesn't match what you have in hand you will KNOW that you have gotten a fraudulent copy of the OS.  This would be great to know for those of us who don't wish to perpetuate fraud and are trying to be legit in our software purchases and installations and have spent small fortunes in doing so.  Again, through no fault to MS....these frauds are occurring and we the public need some help to know when we have a bad copy.  Thanks for getting this point!!!!

    As for the 2nd post...thanks for replying but not sure you understood what I am proposing.  It is interesting that your statement about not purchasing software unless it is from a trusted website like the Microsoft Store...there are several thoughts that cross my mind on that statement.  First, did you consider that you are taking yet another opportunity to promote the Microsoft Store when this should really be about the pervasive problem with fraud and NOT another opportunity to promote MS Store?  Yes, we know MS Store is out there already.  As for not buying unless it is as trusted site?  Well, I'm sure Ebay would be very interested to know that there might be some doubt in your mind that they are not a trusted site...they take great pains to be just that, however, there are still fraudulent activities and Ebay does enforce their policies and remove the listings and the listors whenever they discover them...AND, they do work with the major software vendors like MS in creating policy on this very subject.  Amazon is another site that millions of people use....aren't they considered a trusted site as well.  Sorry for this whole subject in the last couple of sentences but it seems like you didn't address the point that I was talking to which is basically that there is an additional bit of technology that can assist all of us in these fraudulent matters.

    Wednesday, February 2, 2011 12:12 PM
  • You are correct about people just clicking through.  Look at all the issues we see about Office 2010 Home and Student installing the Pro trial and the person not looking at exactly what software is being installed with the piracy of Office Pro Plus vs. Professional.  It plainly states Professional Plus on the installation screen but people still think they actually have a good deal on Pro...

    Some just never learn that if it is too good to be true it is!

    Still it would be good if MS would change the installation screens to state the license agreement on screen with a big STOP and read this without having to open it specifically.

    Wednesday, February 2, 2011 6:22 PM