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Harddrive 7200 rpm vs 5400 rpm does it matter on a WHS RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am looking at two different drives both are 3tb one is 5400 rpm the other is 7200 rpm. Price difference is $50 is it worth the money to get the 7200 rpm?

     

    Thanks in Advance


    ---------------------------------------------- Help the community and mark posts as Answered if it helps you out ----------------------------------------------
    Monday, August 29, 2011 12:26 AM

Answers

  • Not unless you have multiple users and some very high video streaming requirements - otherwise you will not notice any difference in use.
    Phil P.S. If you find my comment helpful or if it answers your question, please mark it as such.
    • Marked as answer by Rollo1002 Monday, August 29, 2011 2:51 PM
    Monday, August 29, 2011 12:49 AM

All replies

  • Not unless you have multiple users and some very high video streaming requirements - otherwise you will not notice any difference in use.
    Phil P.S. If you find my comment helpful or if it answers your question, please mark it as such.
    • Marked as answer by Rollo1002 Monday, August 29, 2011 2:51 PM
    Monday, August 29, 2011 12:49 AM
  • Do note that the 7200 rpm drive will run hotter than the 5400 rpm drive. This may be important if you have cooling issues.
    qts
    Thursday, September 1, 2011 12:08 PM
  • On Mon, 29 Aug 2011 00:26:00 +0000, Rollo1002 wrote:

    I am looking at two different drives both are 3tb one is 5400 rpm the other is 7200 rpm. Price difference is $50 is it worth the money to get the 7200 rpm?

    The faster drive will use a bit more electricity. I think it will not last quite so
    long, but hope/expect someone else will confirm/deny.


     

    Thanks in Advance

    Tuesday, September 6, 2011 3:46 PM
  • Bob, you can determine probable drive life from specs, if sufficiently detailed drive specs are available. Look for MTTF, MTBF, etc. numbers.

    And for grins, look at the "uncorrectable error rate" and compare to the number of bits (because that's what the uncorrectable error rate" is based on, bits) on the drive. You'll probably find that for your average large drive, you will have one error per complete drive read or so.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Tuesday, September 6, 2011 5:06 PM
    Moderator