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Advice on client system disk replacement/restore options RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am sure this has been asked before, but, I did not find the response...............

     

     

    I have a fully functioning WHS OEM system. My goal is to replace my very full 150 GB system disk on one client with a new 500 or so GB drive using a WHS restore.

     

    The client currently has 2 hard drives:

     

    1: system disk, 2 partitions, C (128 GB) and K ( 20 GB scratch drive)

    2: second drive for files, with 3 partitions, F G and H

     

    -

    I only want to replace the first drive. I don't want anything to change on the second one. How will WHS restore "respond" to this change?

     

    Will it offer to replace each partition on the new drive? (does it know the partitions are on the same drive?)

    How will it account for the extra space?

    Will it let me set partitions at a give size

    What will my options be regarding the partitions that will be on the second drive, the one not being replaced?

    Should I unplug the second drive, since it will not need to be restored?

    Am I missing anything?

     

    Thanks for looking and any good advice based on experience with a similiar upgrade.

    MR

     

     

    Monday, February 18, 2008 12:49 AM

Answers

  •  Lakestang wrote:

    I am sure this has been asked before, but, I did not find the response...............

     

     

    I have a fully functioning WHS OEM system. My goal is to replace my very full 150 GB system disk on one client with a new 500 or so GB drive using a WHS restore.

     

    The client currently has 2 hard drives:

     

    1: system disk, 2 partitions, C (128 GB) and K ( 20 GB scratch drive)

    2: second drive for files, with 3 partitions, F G and H

     

    -

    I only want to replace the first drive. I don't want anything to change on the second one. How will WHS restore "respond" to this change?

     

    Will it offer to replace each partition on the new drive? (does it know the partitions are on the same drive?)

    How will it account for the extra space?

    Will it let me set partitions at a give size

    What will my options be regarding the partitions that will be on the second drive, the one not being replaced?

    Should I unplug the second drive, since it will not need to be restored?

    Am I missing anything?

     

    Thanks for looking and any good advice based on experience with a similiar upgrade.

    MR

     

     

     

    I did something similar.  My kids computer had 1 100 gig drive (c,d and e).  Due to the computers being just old enough that they couldn't see a drive larger than 137gig I added another 120gig drive.  So what I had to do was make the 120gig drive the C, and make the 100gig the d and e.  The only problem I ran into was using the WHS restore cd Drive Management.  You can create your partitions and size them, but unless I missed something they all seem to be primary partitions.  So when I restored the data the computer wouldn't boot.  I traced this to the d partition being labled as the active partition, I guess since it was the active partition when it was c.  Since your replacing your c with the new c I don't think you will encounter this problem.

     

    So to answer your questions.

    1  Will it offer to replace each partition - No, you have to create the partitions either with a drive program like Western Digitals Data Life Tools or use the Drive Management that is on the restore cd.

    2 It just adds your data to what ever partition you pick, whats left becomes the free space on the partition. ie. 20 gig backup to a 100gig partition will leave the drive with 80gigs left to use.

    3 See answer number 1.

    4 The drive not being replaced will not be touched, unless you make a mistake.

    5 You can unplug it if it makes you feel safer.

     

    The way the restore comes up is pretty slick.  On the left side will be a column showing all the partitions that were in the backup.  On the right across from each backed up partition is a drop down box to pick where you want to restore too.  The drive letters might not show up as the letters they were, but it all works out in the end.  So it would look like this:

     

    C:  120gig ------------------------------------------------------- C: 400gig

    K:  20gig ----------------------------------------------------------D: 100gig

    F: <-----change this to none on the drop down list

    G: <----change to none

    H: <----change to none

     

    Thats the best I can remember right now.  Just remember your partition sizes and you will know where everything is going.

     

    Kevin

    Tuesday, February 19, 2008 2:44 AM

All replies

  • I would give it a try and see what happens. Remove both old drives, install new drive only,start the restore from the boot cd. I suspect it will restore all contents from the first physical drive. I would anticipate the worst case scenario is that you get the C: partition with no scratch partition. I havent tried backup or restore with multiple partitions on same drive.

    Monday, February 18, 2008 2:24 PM
  • Has anybody done this?

     

    Tuesday, February 19, 2008 1:06 AM
  •  Lakestang wrote:

    I am sure this has been asked before, but, I did not find the response...............

     

     

    I have a fully functioning WHS OEM system. My goal is to replace my very full 150 GB system disk on one client with a new 500 or so GB drive using a WHS restore.

     

    The client currently has 2 hard drives:

     

    1: system disk, 2 partitions, C (128 GB) and K ( 20 GB scratch drive)

    2: second drive for files, with 3 partitions, F G and H

     

    -

    I only want to replace the first drive. I don't want anything to change on the second one. How will WHS restore "respond" to this change?

     

    Will it offer to replace each partition on the new drive? (does it know the partitions are on the same drive?)

    How will it account for the extra space?

    Will it let me set partitions at a give size

    What will my options be regarding the partitions that will be on the second drive, the one not being replaced?

    Should I unplug the second drive, since it will not need to be restored?

    Am I missing anything?

     

    Thanks for looking and any good advice based on experience with a similiar upgrade.

    MR

     

     

     

    I did something similar.  My kids computer had 1 100 gig drive (c,d and e).  Due to the computers being just old enough that they couldn't see a drive larger than 137gig I added another 120gig drive.  So what I had to do was make the 120gig drive the C, and make the 100gig the d and e.  The only problem I ran into was using the WHS restore cd Drive Management.  You can create your partitions and size them, but unless I missed something they all seem to be primary partitions.  So when I restored the data the computer wouldn't boot.  I traced this to the d partition being labled as the active partition, I guess since it was the active partition when it was c.  Since your replacing your c with the new c I don't think you will encounter this problem.

     

    So to answer your questions.

    1  Will it offer to replace each partition - No, you have to create the partitions either with a drive program like Western Digitals Data Life Tools or use the Drive Management that is on the restore cd.

    2 It just adds your data to what ever partition you pick, whats left becomes the free space on the partition. ie. 20 gig backup to a 100gig partition will leave the drive with 80gigs left to use.

    3 See answer number 1.

    4 The drive not being replaced will not be touched, unless you make a mistake.

    5 You can unplug it if it makes you feel safer.

     

    The way the restore comes up is pretty slick.  On the left side will be a column showing all the partitions that were in the backup.  On the right across from each backed up partition is a drop down box to pick where you want to restore too.  The drive letters might not show up as the letters they were, but it all works out in the end.  So it would look like this:

     

    C:  120gig ------------------------------------------------------- C: 400gig

    K:  20gig ----------------------------------------------------------D: 100gig

    F: <-----change this to none on the drop down list

    G: <----change to none

    H: <----change to none

     

    Thats the best I can remember right now.  Just remember your partition sizes and you will know where everything is going.

     

    Kevin

    Tuesday, February 19, 2008 2:44 AM
  •  

    Thanks Kevin, that's what I wanted to know, ready to move forward.
    Tuesday, February 19, 2008 2:53 AM
  • Good luck, other than that one hiccup everything went pretty smoothly for me.  I did 2 other computers after that 1st one and all worked out well.

     

    Tuesday, February 19, 2008 3:32 AM