none
Question on WHS V1 vs V2 (vail) RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have been looking to build a home server and WHS for a very long time. I am finally about 4 -6 weeks away.  I just read a couple of blog entries on the recent announcment about V2  and Drive Extender.  Simply this- Will the new V2 WHS be capable of performing the 6 capabilities listed on the WHS home page that V1 can (http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/winfamily/windowshomeserver/default.mspx)?   If partially for specific capabilities please explain differences and your personal assessment.

    Thanks very much, a very upset\concerned fan of WHS.

    Saturday, November 27, 2010 7:01 AM

All replies

  • Yes. It will continue to be fully capable of performing all those functions. Drive Extender supplies local data protection and high availability for your data, and a way to span multiple heterogeneous disks, so it's removal doesn't affect any of those functions.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Saturday, November 27, 2010 12:52 PM
    Moderator
  • If you do a search on Engadget.com, there is an articel that states that Microsoft is pulling DE from Veil due to the many isues with it. There is a follow up article that states that even though WHS has a very small install base, people are screaming loud enough about the absence of DE in Veil that Balmer has decided to re-look at it so its a big mystery if this will be part of Veil
    WHS_retail version
    Monday, November 29, 2010 10:02 PM
  • Thanks for replying.

    I have 3 desktops and about to purchase 3 netbooks.  Standard stuff - across all desktops over 100GB photos and equal music plus typical user data for office apps and cad data files etc.   First purpose is for system backup and recovery.  It seems that more administration will be required.  W/O DE and utilizing standard disk config, i.e. non-raid; performance will be affected and availability/reliability reduced.   I'm familiar with raid configs but understand the disk compatibility sensitivity must be honored.  Also adding disks isn't 'plug and play' easy.  I also imagine different chipsets and associated drivers add to the administration concerns and late nights.  I never felt the need to have to enable it on my desktops.  I thought the DE function was a handsome implementation alleviating the multitude horror stories. 

    Isn't it true that w/o raid config and DE HS will not provide the data redundancy?

    On a separate issue - media or data streaming-  video streaming to a TV.  The new LED Tv's have a network port -  what additional hardware (if any) would be needed to stream from HS to such TV?  If MS Media Center was part of HS would this make it easier?

    Thanks

    Thursday, December 2, 2010 6:36 AM
  • Yes here it is:

    http://www.engadget.com/2010/11/29/steve-ballmer-looking-into-removal-of-drive-extender-from-window?icid=sphere_blogsmith_inpage_engadget

     

    However, also more bad news ( not un expected), http://www.engadget.com/2010/12/01/hp-dropping-windows-home-server-to-focus-on-webos-wont-be-hitt?icid=sphere_blogsmith_inpage_engadget

    I's all about volume to these companies.  How long will HS work w/o their support?  Add cloud computing backups and the nails are adding up.   A very dismayed prospective Home Server customer.  

    Thursday, December 2, 2010 6:52 AM
  • Without Drive Extender, or some substitute providing equivalent local data protection/high availability, you won't have that. However, please realize that RAID and RAID-like technologies provide a somewhat false sense of security. They keep you from losing data if one drive fails, but they don't typically protect you from much of anything else: force majeure events like fire, flood, theft; user error; data corruption due to application errors. They also don't provide the ability to go back in the history of your data.

    Bottom line for me is that Drive Extender was great. What it did was way better than nothing. But honestly, server backup is the real answer. The server backup feature of Vail is fully capable of restoring your entire server (including full system state information) from a backup, and that's likely to be faster than messing around trying to recover from a partially failed state. And with disk drives becoming larger and less expensive, server backup is a more usable alternative than ever before.

    As for media, Vail includes DLNA server capabilities. If your television or other connected media client is able to consume DLNA, and if there's a common codec that can be used, then yes, you can stream directly to your TV. If DLNA isn't an option, but your device can access SMB file shares and your media are in a supported format, that will also work. Otherwise, just like today, you're out of luck.

    Media Center isn't going to happen. It's pretty obvious that Microsoft doesn't consider your home server as a Media Center PC, the center of your home theater and media experience. It's a supplier of media, a place to keep media and organize it for use elsewhere, not a place to create media.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Thursday, December 2, 2010 1:27 PM
    Moderator
  • Ken, When u state:

    'But honestly, server backup is the real answer. The server backup feature of Vail is fully capable of restoring your entire server (including full system state information) from a backup, and that's likely to be faster than messing around trying to recover from a partially failed state. And with disk drives becoming larger and less expensive, server backup is a more usable alternative than ever before.'

     

    You also include the client pc's in that restoration ability after server rebuild. correct? and those restores of any computer (server or client) will utilize incremental backups to rebuild to most current latest state. correct?

    thanks

    z 

    Thursday, December 2, 2010 7:03 PM
  • Yes. If your house burns down, you can (in theory; haven't had to implement the practical side, fortunately) restore your entire home network (or as much of it as was backed up to your home server) from the backup disk stored in your office.

    Because I don't load lots of software on my server, I would restore the shares and the backup database, but maybe not system state (unless it was on identical hardware). Then I'd build new clients, and restore data to them as needed.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Thursday, December 2, 2010 8:01 PM
    Moderator