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Planning a career in Security RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello,

    I'm currently studying for my MCSE 2003: Security, I have completed Exam #620 TS: Configuring Microsoft Windows Vista Client (Thought it would be a better idea since i have been using XP since release). My goal is to get into the "nit & grit" of system and network security.
    My expierence in security is only based on my role as a Junior systems administrator and the following books
    Most of the tests I perform are from a CD from one of the following books
    Ethical Hackers Handbook
    Pentesters open source handbook
    Virus Research and Defence
    Security Administrator - Street Smarts (Comptia Security)
    Metasploit Toolkit
    "hackers Black Book" - Contains source code to a few well known virus's
    I have been researching other courses that I hope to persue after the MCSE's and I'm looking for any opinion's that you may have. The following are the courses that I have been looking at:
    Certified Ethical Hacker
    Computer Hacking Forensic Investigator
    Certified Security Analyst
    Certified Network Defense Architect Certification
    Licensed Penetration Tester

    Cheers

    Friday, December 19, 2008 12:08 AM

Answers

  • Hey John,

    You might want to give the (ICS)2 a look as well. The CISSP is a very popular certification to have in the security field.
    Michael D. Alligood,
    MCITP: Enterprise Support Technician, Consumer Support Technician
    MCTS: Windows Vista - Configuration,
    MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+, Network+

    The I.T. Classroom Blog
    Start. Research. Plan. Perform. Finish. Test. Evaluate.
    Friday, December 19, 2008 12:56 AM
  •  I recently went after my CISSP and feel it is the most comprehensive, yet subjective security cert available.  Be warned, it's not for the faint of heart, however.
    • Proposed as answer by Niall MerriganMVP Wednesday, January 21, 2009 8:31 PM
    • Marked as answer by John D Kelly Thursday, January 22, 2009 10:25 AM
    Friday, December 19, 2008 3:15 PM

All replies

  • Hey John,

    You might want to give the (ICS)2 a look as well. The CISSP is a very popular certification to have in the security field.
    Michael D. Alligood,
    MCITP: Enterprise Support Technician, Consumer Support Technician
    MCTS: Windows Vista - Configuration,
    MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+, Network+

    The I.T. Classroom Blog
    Start. Research. Plan. Perform. Finish. Test. Evaluate.
    Friday, December 19, 2008 12:56 AM
  •  I recently went after my CISSP and feel it is the most comprehensive, yet subjective security cert available.  Be warned, it's not for the faint of heart, however.
    • Proposed as answer by Niall MerriganMVP Wednesday, January 21, 2009 8:31 PM
    • Marked as answer by John D Kelly Thursday, January 22, 2009 10:25 AM
    Friday, December 19, 2008 3:15 PM
  • Gazanga, you are correct. And I believe, if it hasn't changed, that the recertification process is an on going process. Regardless, it is a certification that provides high value in the security field.
    Michael D. Alligood,
    MCITP: Enterprise Support Technician, Consumer Support Technician
    MCTS: Windows Vista - Configuration,
    MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+, Network+

    The I.T. Classroom Blog
    Start. Research. Plan. Perform. Finish. Test. Evaluate.
    Friday, December 19, 2008 3:21 PM
  • Thank you all very much for your replies. I have been looking at the CISSP-ISSEP (and i agree with you Gazanga, the objectives of the course are without a doubt not for the faint of heart), some of the requirements to even get a hand in the course it's  self are particulary difficult:

    a minimum of five years of professional experience in the information security field or four years plus a college degree. Or, an Advanced Degree in Information Security from a National Center of Excellence or the regional equivalent can substitute for one year towards the five-year requirement.

    I think this will be my main reason to leave the CISSP-ISSEP for now and continue with the CEH, CPT etc. Most of the other security courses brush over the main topics in the CISSP course. I would perfer to start the course with a better understanding of each topic / objective than be slacking at the beginning.


    Again thank you for your replies ;)
    Wednesday, January 21, 2009 12:29 PM