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Need advice on possible CRM deployment... RRS feed

  • Question

  • Our current Dynamic CRM 2011 setup only has 3 client's/employers in it. The way we have it setup is as follows

    • Each client/employer has it's own solution
    • Each solution has an entity
    • Each entity has 1-2 forms, 1 dashboard, several views and 10-20 custom fields
    • Each client/employer can have anywhere from 10 to 500 employees.
    • The forms are where the employee information is entered
    • The CRM is accessed by several people in the office, possibly concurrently

    The 3 employers that are currently in the CRM are new and were basically to see what we could do with the CRM. My employer wants to know if the CRM could handle adding all of our client's/employers, which there are 500-600 that would need to be added, as well as any new client's/employers. My questions are this:

    1. Is CRM capable of handling this type of application
    2. Is our current setup the best way to approach our needs
    3. If not, what is a better approach
    4. If CRM isn't the best solution for this dilemma, what might be a better solution

    Thanks for any advice you can give. 



    • Edited by nasyrax Monday, July 7, 2014 6:21 PM
    Monday, July 7, 2014 6:19 PM

Answers

  • Hi nasyrax,

    I would not recommend going for the approach you're stating. When you say you're going to have 1000+ employers, which means 1000+ solutions; CRM is definitely going to falter. I am not even sure if you can have 1000+ solutions and if that is even remotely possible it's not feasible to maintain probably thousands of entities (if you're using CRM On Premise, Online won't even allow beyond some 200 entities). Using 1000+ different Organizations is not an option either, maintaining would be simply crazy.

    What I would suggest is this:

    Use a single entity for tracking your employers and a second entity for their employees. Probably create custom entities for them, if you're already using Contacts and Accounts for other purposes; or you could reuse them; say Account acts as Employers and Contacts as Employees. You could have a dropdown field for your Employers to categorize them as Academic, Govt., etc. Using security roles and field level security and role based forms, you can limit the amount of data your customer care representatives see about employers or employees. As far as dashboards are concerned, you can create dashboards and share them with required users. The biggest advantage of following a similar approach like this is preventing your CRM from being crowded with 1000s of entities and it will later facilitate reporting (which I believe you'll need sooner or later). Dynamics CRM has a robust security model and using things like Business Units, Teams, Security Roles, Role Based Forms, Field Level Security, etc. you can achieve what you need.

    Hope this helps!


    Admin QuikView Solution for CRM 2013

    • Marked as answer by nasyrax Monday, July 14, 2014 12:49 PM
    Monday, July 14, 2014 12:16 PM

All replies

  • Anybody? 
    Tuesday, July 8, 2014 12:17 PM
  • PLEASE!
    Wednesday, July 9, 2014 3:58 PM
  • Hi nasyrax,

    Sorry to have missed out your question and for the delayed response. When you're saying "solution", do you actually mean the solution in customization or do you mean organizations. If you actually mean solution, I don't think that's the best way to using CRM, since you're actually using different entities for each employer to track their employees. So, when you grow to hundreds and thousands of employers you will end up with that many entities which is definitely not a good choice. I would suggest viewing it from the Business Unit point of scenario where you can basically use the same entity to store all employers and have permissions set to prevent employers from seeing each others employees, if that is what you want. If you structure it this way, CRM is very much capable of handling things.


    Admin QuikView Solution for CRM 2013

    Wednesday, July 9, 2014 4:20 PM
  • Thanks for the response! The actual employers won't ever see this data, it's used internally so our staff has a central place to view information for all the different employers. I thought about sorting the employers by industry type, e.g., Government, Academic, Non-profit. If I were to do it that way, would it be best to do entities for each type, or would you make solutions for each?

    This is going to serve two purposes, one is for when the employers send in information on their employees, it will be input into one CRM form, and then another form for our customer service people to view for information about the employee and employer when they answer calls.

    I hope that makes sense. Thanks again for your feedback, it seems like it's in the right direction.

    UPDATE:

    There will be (possibly) 1000+ different employers, each having 500+ employees. So would it be best to create a solution for each employer or a single solution with dashboards for each employer, or solutions for each employer type, e.g. Academic, Non-profit, Government, with custom entities for each employer. Sorry to be asking so many questions, I'm completely new to this process and any feedback you can give is greatly appreciated!


    • Edited by nasyrax Friday, July 11, 2014 2:36 PM
    Wednesday, July 9, 2014 5:41 PM
  • Hi nasyrax,

    I would not recommend going for the approach you're stating. When you say you're going to have 1000+ employers, which means 1000+ solutions; CRM is definitely going to falter. I am not even sure if you can have 1000+ solutions and if that is even remotely possible it's not feasible to maintain probably thousands of entities (if you're using CRM On Premise, Online won't even allow beyond some 200 entities). Using 1000+ different Organizations is not an option either, maintaining would be simply crazy.

    What I would suggest is this:

    Use a single entity for tracking your employers and a second entity for their employees. Probably create custom entities for them, if you're already using Contacts and Accounts for other purposes; or you could reuse them; say Account acts as Employers and Contacts as Employees. You could have a dropdown field for your Employers to categorize them as Academic, Govt., etc. Using security roles and field level security and role based forms, you can limit the amount of data your customer care representatives see about employers or employees. As far as dashboards are concerned, you can create dashboards and share them with required users. The biggest advantage of following a similar approach like this is preventing your CRM from being crowded with 1000s of entities and it will later facilitate reporting (which I believe you'll need sooner or later). Dynamics CRM has a robust security model and using things like Business Units, Teams, Security Roles, Role Based Forms, Field Level Security, etc. you can achieve what you need.

    Hope this helps!


    Admin QuikView Solution for CRM 2013

    • Marked as answer by nasyrax Monday, July 14, 2014 12:49 PM
    Monday, July 14, 2014 12:16 PM
  • Thanks SOOO much! Your suggestion makes a lot of sense!
    Monday, July 14, 2014 1:59 PM