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  • Question

  • Why is it now so easy for counterfeiters to get temp product keys?

    Seems to me a LOT of ppl are getting screwed with these great fake versions of win7 that install and run (for a while) with no issues. then BAM! oh yea! that disc you got a while ago is a fake.. What did Microsoft do in enable this? Or better still WHY?  

    Friday, July 15, 2011 10:04 PM

Answers

  • They are not temp product keys.  They are genuine MSDN keys harvested from MSDN subscriptions obtained by fraudulent means.  It is when Microsoft discovers that a key is being abused (used by someone who is not the subscriber the key is assigned to) that the key is blocked and the user get the non-genuine notification.  Microsoft did not do anything that enables the scam any more than it ever was.  The crooks obtained high quality manufacturing equipment (in China) and came up with the present scheme.  Blame the crooks. 
    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Saturday, July 16, 2011 12:11 AM
    Answerer

All replies

  • "E_Dragon" wrote in message news:410648d3-1461-41ee-a7f3-48d18d62acde...

    Why is it now so easy for counterfeiters to get temp product keys?

    Seems to me a LOT of ppl are getting screwed with these great fake versions of win7 that install and run (for a while) with no issues. then BAM! oh yea! that disc you got a while ago is a fake.. What did Microsoft do in enable this? Or better still WHY?  


    It's not - they have to pay for them (frequently using someone else's credit card).
    The problem is that they rely on the gullibility of the general public, who seem to never learn that what seems too good to be true, probably is.
     
    If you've been caught, you my offer of assistance, but you'll get little sympathy from anyone in this forum, as we've heard every possible variation (I believe - but all things are possible), and they almost all boil down to hoping for a miracle.
     
    Here's my standard spiel on why such things take time...
    For MSDN Keys:-
     
    MS can only act once a key hits a threshold (and they won't tell an outsider what that threshold is, understandably). They then have to put it through internal systems to ensure that all relevant parties are informed, just in case it's an oversight - then it enters the queue for the next update to the system. I have no idea how often the WAT checking system is updated, but I would suspect that it's no more than weekly because of admin and timing issues. The internal MS processes could therefore take easily a couple of weeks.
    It therefore depends on how close to the end of a vendors sales list you are, and how quickly he's selling them.
    The cannier ones will sell just enough to stay under the threshold for each product (MSDN subs include a huge number of products), until they've maximised the profits, then try and flood the market before disappearing into the sunset, laden with your cash. This could take anything up to a year or more.
     
    For products sold using a loader:-
    The loader gets around online activation by fooling the computer into thinking that the OS is installed onto the correct machine, by modifying certain files. Because of a number of factors, it's impossible to stop this, so MS came up with the WAT update - which has the ability to scan the relevant files, and detect the use of a loader tool. If the user fully updates the machine, including recommended updates and optional updates, then the WAT update is installed and starts work, and within 3 days, a loader-installed machine will get a notification. However, the WAT update is a voluntary one, at least at the first update run, and can be uninstalled, or refused
    The other time the WAT update is installed, is when you validate Windows for some reason - it is part of the validation process, rather than the activation process. this time, it does the scan immediately, and again this will show as non-genuine if a Loader is present.
    If a user never needs/wants to validate, then they need never install the WAT update, and may never see a non-genuine notification.
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Friday, July 15, 2011 10:35 PM
    Moderator
  • It's your responsiblity to only do business with an entity that has a proven reputation, is trustworthy, reliable and established.  Example: Microsoft Store


    Carey Frisch
    Friday, July 15, 2011 11:09 PM
    Moderator
  • They are not temp product keys.  They are genuine MSDN keys harvested from MSDN subscriptions obtained by fraudulent means.  It is when Microsoft discovers that a key is being abused (used by someone who is not the subscriber the key is assigned to) that the key is blocked and the user get the non-genuine notification.  Microsoft did not do anything that enables the scam any more than it ever was.  The crooks obtained high quality manufacturing equipment (in China) and came up with the present scheme.  Blame the crooks. 
    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Saturday, July 16, 2011 12:11 AM
    Answerer