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More efficient backup RRS feed

  • Question

  • Just a thought in these days of energy crisis. To suggest that people leave multiple machines running all the time (bad enough having one) for backups seems to be a little wastefull in these days of global warming.
    My backup strategy here is to wakeup the machines at a given time back them up and turn the machine off at completion. I can do this with scheduled tasks and scripts surely you can write some code for it. How hard is it to send a wol packet over a local network and a shutdown -f.

    Thursday, April 26, 2007 12:11 PM

Answers

  • Well, WHS will wake a machine from standby to do a backup (unless the machine is on battery, in which case it will remain on standby). Then the machine will, or should, go back to standby according to the settings in Power Options.
    Thursday, April 26, 2007 2:45 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Well, WHS will wake a machine from standby to do a backup (unless the machine is on battery, in which case it will remain on standby). Then the machine will, or should, go back to standby according to the settings in Power Options.
    Thursday, April 26, 2007 2:45 PM
    Moderator
  •  Chris in AU wrote:
    Just a thought in these days of energy crisis. To suggest that people leave multiple machines running all the time (bad enough having one) for backups seems to be a little wastefull in these days of global warming.
    My backup strategy here is to wakeup the machines at a given time back them up and turn the machine off at completion. I can do this with scheduled tasks and scripts surely you can write some code for it. How hard is it to send a wol packet over a local network and a shutdown -f.

    Chris,

    As Ken suggests, its built-in to WHS already.

     

    As well as Standby that Ken suggested, my tablet will wake up from Hibernate run the backup & then go back to sleep.

     

    Jay

    Thursday, April 26, 2007 5:14 PM
  • Thanks for the replies, it looks like wakeup was considered for the backup, that being said I don't really like sleep and hibernate for my desktops, it adds a level of hardware complexity and possible unreliability. The back up strategy can be as simple as pinging the workstation if it responds back it up, if not send WOL wait, back it up, send it a shutdown after the backup. This requires no configuration in windows.
    Thursday, April 26, 2007 11:20 PM
  •  Chris in AU wrote:
    Thanks for the replies, it looks like wakeup was considered for the backup, that being said I don't really like sleep and hibernate for my desktops, it adds a level of hardware complexity and possible unreliability. The back up strategy can be as simple as pinging the workstation if it responds back it up, if not send WOL wait, back it up, send it a shutdown after the backup. This requires no configuration in windows.

     

    Not sure if I'm following you. WHS today will handle all the configuration for you. Other then using Stand By or Hibernate instead of "turn off" when you are done with your computer there is nothing you a user needs to do. WHS will take care of it for you. I've also noticed that recent OSs (XP & Vista) tend to prefer/favor to Stand By/Hibernate rather then be turned off...

     

    I'm not seeing a huge difference whether only the WHS server is configured to wake up & do the backup or the client is configured to wake up & do the backup.  In both cases WHS takes care of the configuration. Nor am I seeing a huge difference in "level of hardware complexity & possible unreliability" between wake on lan verses wake "self" from hibernate. I'm a big fan of "it just works" technology, as I stated backups today "just works" from hibernate or stand by.

     

    My understanding is that a computer in Stand By comsumes a small of power (its "on" but in a low power mode), while a computer in Hibernate is effectively turned off (I understand some are in extremely low nearly impercievable power state).

     

    Truthfully I can see WHS supporting both methods, as I'm sure there are computers that can not wake on LAN (I know most of mine cannot) & equally I also suspect there are computers that cannot hibernate. I would expect WHS to choose which method to use based on what is available, without requiring me to configure anything (the "it just work" thing).

     

    What you want to do, if you haven't already is to enter a suggestion on Connect.

     

    Jay

    Friday, April 27, 2007 2:16 PM
  • It seems to me that suggestions to posts from those stating they do not take to leaving computers on at "all times" unattended do not really address the facts stated. That the WHS will "wake up" hibernating and/or sleeping computers does not address the concern  Sleep and hiberante modes require power and the unit in a "power on" state.  Personnaly I, and probably like most home users,  power off all computers that is "Off" period.

     

    Backup is resolved by configuring backups during hours network is active.

    Saturday, April 28, 2007 9:57 PM
  •  AJROCO wrote:

    Personnaly I, and probably like most home users, power off all computers that is "Off" period.

    The only way to turn a modern computer completely off, i.e. consuming 0 watts of power, is to reach around the back and turn off the power supply. (Actually, unplug it, because a lot of power supplies consume a couple of watts even if turned off.) If you use the normal shut down procedure in Windows, you're using what's called "soft off". In this state the computer consumes the same amount of power it would in a "hibernate" (S5) state, a few watts. The exact amount varies a bit from PC to PC, but it's less than 10 in almost all cases. See e.g. Wikipedia, which gives a good layman's description of the various power states.

    I will concede that S3 or standby consumes noticeably more power, because memory and certain other systems remain powered up that would be shut down in S5 or soft off states.
    Saturday, April 28, 2007 10:30 PM
    Moderator
  • ATX power supplies provide a 5 volt "signal" voltage to the system board while unit is plugged into a wall socket.  Pushing the power on button routes the 5 volts to the power supply to turn on "full" power (ala soft power) - a carryover from the use of continuous filament power to fast start TVs.  Most system boards now include a LED to indicate the presence, or absence, of the 5 volts as a troubleshooting procedure.
    Sunday, April 29, 2007 8:03 PM
  • As an effort to provide energy efficiency, Microsoft should really include Power Saving options easily accessible in the console and during the new installation process. From the look of HP MediaSmart server, it probably consumes 120W-200W as midrange AMD64 desktop. Running it 24-7 would easily cost more than $200 per year.
    Saturday, June 16, 2007 1:41 AM