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How to avoid a re-activation phone call after a reformat? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I performed an upgrade install of Windows 7 Ultimate from the HP upgrade
    program several months ago and successfully activated it then. Later on, my
    TV tuner gradually stopped working and I solved it be re-seating the card
    into a different slot. Windows 7 complained about activation and I called
    the 800 number and the automated system was able to successfully activate my
    copy again. Being a software tester, I often re-format my drive and each
    time I re-install Windows 7 on my system, my product key doesn't activate my
    copy and have to call Microsoft again. I don't understand why I have to do
    this every time I reformat? Shouldn't the product activation server
    recognize that my configuration hasn't changed and remember that I did call
    and successfully activate Windows 7 again after changing the slot of my TV
    tuner card? I thought by calling the activation phone number that when this
    first happened, my "old" configuration was thrown out and my "new"
    configuration would be "updated" with the same product key. I have since
    started using Norton Ghost to image my drive and have avoided the problem,
    but is this a flaw in the activation process? Is their another way to
    avoiding calling the Activation number again?
    --
    Greg Parks
    gdp310@comcast.net
     
     
    Thursday, June 17, 2010 3:23 AM

Answers

  • "Wheels of Flames" wrote in message news:42093192-66cf-460a-a395-5a89ec14a176...
    I performed an upgrade install of Windows 7 Ultimate from the HP upgrade
    program several months ago and successfully activated it then. Later on, my
    TV tuner gradually stopped working and I solved it be re-seating the card
    into a different slot. Windows 7 complained about activation and I called
    the 800 number and the automated system was able to successfully activate my
    copy again. Being a software tester, I often re-format my drive and each
    time I re-install Windows 7 on my system, my product key doesn't activate my
    copy and have to call Microsoft again. I don't understand why I have to do
    this every time I reformat? Shouldn't the product activation server
    recognize that my configuration hasn't changed and remember that I did call
    and successfully activate Windows 7 again after changing the slot of my TV
    tuner card? I thought by calling the activation phone number that when this
    first happened, my "old" configuration was thrown out and my "new"
    configuration would be "updated" with the same product key. I have since
    started using Norton Ghost to image my drive and have avoided the problem,
    but is this a flaw in the activation process? Is their another way to
    avoiding calling the Activation number again?
    --
    Greg Parks
    gdp310@comcast.net
     
     

    I agree that rather than reformatting and reinstalling every time, you use an Imaging program for backup - then it's a simple matter of restoring your image every time, which is pre-activated.
    Ghost is not one I would have chosen - it's had problems ever since Symantec bought Norton. Attempting to image an OS from anywhere near the OS boot is a definite no-no!
    My personal favourite is BootItNG from www.terabyteunlimited.com - which is a full-blown partition manager as well as an imaging tool.
    If you find that you have to re-activate after restoring an image, simply create a new image afterwards, and then use that as your std image - keep the old one as backup in case you revert to the earlier configuration.
     
    What you saw is not really a flaw - but it is an inevitable consequence of the way the activation test works.
    Have a look here for an excellent description of Activation in XP - it's not really changed much since except in small details, and how 'failures' are dealt with. http://aumha.org/win5/a/wpa.php
     
    FWIW, I had to re-activate a system the other day after changing a CD-ROM to a CD-RW - which in theory shouldn't have happened, since AFAICT there had been no hardware changes on the machine at all since at least 2007. What I suspect triggered the activation was that I had put in the correct Chipset drivers the day before (for the first time since the machine came out of a refurb shop!) - so that notched up a lot of red flags for Activation, and changing the CD was enough to trip it over.
     
    HTH?

    --
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Thursday, June 17, 2010 7:13 AM
    Moderator