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Broken Motherboard RRS feed

  • Question

  • Okay...I broke down and got a copy of XP Home thanks to a $50 rebate offered.....now my motherboard has died....I have another EXACT computer without a hard drive and memory....will my XP become non genuine if I just put the hard drive and memory from the bad machine into the other one?
    Wednesday, July 19, 2006 5:35 PM

Answers

  • Kellyskids,

    You probably purchased a retail XP Home upgrade.

    EDIT:  What version/edition of Windows are you upgrading from?

    IMO you probably won't even have to reactivate assuming the only hardware change is the mobo.  If you are changing mobo, hard disk, and memory size, then chances are better than even that you will need to reactivate.  Even if you do, your activation "task" should take less than 10 seconds over the internet, no phone calls necessary.

    Wednesday, July 19, 2006 6:53 PM

All replies

  • Kellyskids,

    I am just curious, is that a retail copy that you bought from the store, or was this a copy that you got from your systembuilder, if you had a systembuilder in the first place (Dell, Gateway, etc)

    Thanks,

    Wednesday, July 19, 2006 6:05 PM
  • You will have to reactivate, but that shouldn't take more than a few seconds. :)
    Wednesday, July 19, 2006 6:15 PM
  • Well my machine was purchase on ebay...it had an illegal VLK so I purchased a retail copy from a major local chain who was offering a 50 mail in rebate....this brought me to the price point $50 I have been saying this program should be charging all along...
    Wednesday, July 19, 2006 6:35 PM
  • How does one go about reactivating it????  Will it prompt me to do so?  It is my understanding the genuine program uses the CPU serial number so if I also swap CPUs will that do the trick w/o reactivating? (like I said the motherboard is exactlly the same).
    Wednesday, July 19, 2006 6:37 PM
  • Kellyskids,

    You probably purchased a retail XP Home upgrade.

    EDIT:  What version/edition of Windows are you upgrading from?

    IMO you probably won't even have to reactivate assuming the only hardware change is the mobo.  If you are changing mobo, hard disk, and memory size, then chances are better than even that you will need to reactivate.  Even if you do, your activation "task" should take less than 10 seconds over the internet, no phone calls necessary.

    Wednesday, July 19, 2006 6:53 PM
  • If you replace the motherboard with the same model, you'll be ok. If you have a new model motherboard, then you will have no trouble activating and becomming genuine (although you'll probably have to talk to an operator), however- it is against MS EULA, as each license is married to the motherboard it is first installed on. Legally speaking if you change the motherboard you need to purchase a new license. Technically speaking, there are no real safe guards to actually stop you from using the same license, just a few hoops to jump through.
    Wednesday, July 26, 2006 7:31 PM
  • La,

    This poster is using a retail upgrade license for XP.

    While what you posted is true for Systembuilder/OEM and Royalty/OEM licenses, and is true for Volume Licenses, it may or may not be true for retail upgrades.  It depends upon what exactly was upgraded---the characteristics of that "base" license which was upgraded determines whether this poster's retail upgrade can be moved from computer to computer, IIRC.

    Thursday, July 27, 2006 2:18 AM
  • Be very carefull , my pc is a HP that came with xp installed into the hard drive , 2 yrs ago my motherboard died so i had it repleaced , months later i reformatted my pc only to find xp had become void after numerous phones calls to microsoft and hp and no help from either i took it back to a pc shop and they said "they fixed it " well guess what now i have a message saying my xp may be counterfeit and guess what again the pc shop is no longer there , looks like its going to cost me more money now

     

    Thursday, July 27, 2006 11:28 AM
  • First Yes is was a Retail Upgrade....

    Second....I ended up moving just the Memory and Harddrive to the new machine....because it was an "all-in-one" motherboard with built in video and network card Windows XP Home came up with a message something like "significate changes have been made to your machine you will need to re-activate".  That is fine...it gave me a form to fill in which I did.  However, after about 20 minutes of a "Checking connection" message being on the screen, it came back with a error message "this license number in already in use you need to re validate".......NO KIDDING!  WINDOWS ALREADY TOLD ME THAT !!!! 

    So after several failed attempts to do this online....I ended up calling a 888 number....it asked me to talk (or telephone key pad) this LOOOONG string of numbers  only to come back at tell me that my key was not valid (I tried this twice as I thought maybe I input the wrong numbers as there is no "verification")   I finally ended up talking to a "live" person who told me to "call back".   The second attempt (one minute later by the way) resulted in a successful activation but I must say.......THIS WAS WAY TOO COMPLICATED.....

    First, why bother giving me a option to reactivate via the internet when apparently you cant...

    Second, to me it would make most sense to only link the activation to the harddrive serial number...that way the only time reactivation would be require is if an new hard drive installed........because as I read it...if I replace the network card and 1 of the other 10 devices it checks...I have to re-active.......that makes no sense to me.....

    Anyway I am all set now..... 

    Thursday, July 27, 2006 3:27 PM
  • That's a good point. I honestly read the first post and then promptly forgot that they mentioned they bought a license (which had to be retail). So disregard what I said and consider yourself awesome.
    Thursday, July 27, 2006 4:26 PM
  • This issue with OEM copies is a huge headache for small system builders who do out-of-warranty repairs and upgrades.

    General public sees that they have already paid for windows once - they have the sticker on the box and a hole in their wallet. Few years later motherboard goes boom. Off to a repair shop it goes. Usually manufacturer's warranty is gone at this point, and identical board is impossible to obtain.

    If repair shop goes by the microsoft party line, at this point the owner has to pay for new motherboard, repair work AND a new license, as it's a "new computer". Because Microsoft says it is.

    Everyone else on this planet says it's the same computer, being repaired with a non-identical motherboard, because we all know that finding an identical board of an obsolete model even 2-3 years after purchase is next to impossible.

    Most repair shops ignore this OEM license term, and go ahead and replace the board and reactivate over the phone, telling the operator it's a warranty repair to get it thru. At this point the customer has technically a non-licensed copy, and who knows if it blows up to WGA or some other thingy in the future. However, there is no way for the customer to know it. And those repair shops who try to go by the license terms ensure they will never repair anything for that customer or his friends again, because they 'ripped the customer off by forcibly reselling windows license for no reason' (or end up in small claims with the repair shop or worse). Normal people just don't accept that swapping one failed component inside the PC suddenly makes it a 'new pc'.

    OEM version being tied to single make/model of a board is total *** and the whole distinction between the OEM and Retail copies in this regard should be removed. People understand the difference of support (OEM = no support except maybe from the system builder, Retail = You can call Microsoft for help), but digging up legalese when the system fails and trying to convince a layman to accept that his repaired computer is suddenly a new PC requiring a new license just doesn't fly in the real world, and the whole license term is just something that should be outlawed. It mostly ends up harming legimate users of Windows and legimate repair shops who actually care about doing things by the book. Those shops who ignore the terms and 'just fix it' reap the benefits - at least until microsoft decides their copy is no longer valid.

    Non-enforceable terms should not be in the license.

    Friday, July 28, 2006 1:58 PM