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RAID-5 Array Failed - Now displaying RAW file system - Help! RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi, ALl

    I am running a 5 x 3TB RAID-5 array on my WHS 2011 server and everything has been perfect. The other day, however, my area was hit with a few sporadic power outages that corrupted by RAID and put it into a state of "Failed Redundancy". I followed the instructions posted on Microsoft site for determining the volume and disk that had failed.

    Following that, I pulled the drive and replace it with a new 3TB drive but the "Repair" option was greyed out (something that I have found to be quite common on the boards).

    I read on one site that the failed drive needed to be physically present in the system WITH the new drive in order for the "Repair" option to appear. This, however did not work for me. After a refresh, I was able at one point to get the repair option but it just kept moving the "Unallocated" drive around and failing. The volume drive letter for the RAID was also not appearing without the failed drive.

    As a last ditch effort, thinking that the RAID should repair itself to a new disk, I removed the faulty drive, replaced it with a new one and restored my C: and system to a system backup from two days prior. I thought maybe I could trick the system into thinking that the new blank drive was the one previous and that it would resync and rebuild.

    It did that - after 48 hours of resyncing, the RAID array now reads "Healthy"

    There is a problem, though...

    The file system is reading RAW (not NTFS) and all of my files are inaccessible. It continually asks me to format the drive which, of course, I am not prepared to do at this point.

    How can I reactivate the drives as NTFS (if at all)?

    I am reading on one board that this same issue was rectified with -"chkdsk M: /f" where M; is my RAID drive letter.

    Will this work?

    Is there any way to restore this array to a working NTFS RAID array?

    Recovering the files it seems will rename everything. It seems that I can access data from a recovery tool from each individual drive but this is of course not ideal.

    Any help would be much appreciated.

    Cheers,

    Aaron

    Monday, March 25, 2013 7:43 PM

Answers

  • Hi, there and thank you for your reply.

    Ultimately, in the end, reformatting the new drive and starting the RAID-5 from scratch was the way I had to go. To clarify, this indeed is the software RAID built into the Windows Server. It works great it really is my fault for not having a battery backup to protect from power surges. There was a lot of corruption. Currently I am restoring my data from a variety of places and should have most of it back up. All family memories are preserved so that is the main thing. I can re-rip music and stuff.

    Sunday, March 31, 2013 5:48 PM

All replies

  • Well...I'm giving it a shot as we speak.

    CMD

    chkdsk M: f/ (where M: is my RAID drive letter)

    It is deleting and correcting a variety of index entries (as is to be expected from a series of hard shutdown power failures). I have a large amount (not all but a large amount) of the data backed up so not overly paranoid (just slightly). I'm imaging that I'm currently losing the 3TB that were on the drive I replaced.

    So far it recognizes the drive letter and volume name and recognizes that it is formatted NTFS even if it is showing as RAW.

    Fingers crossed.

    Monday, March 25, 2013 10:03 PM
  • Let's backtrack a bit. Is this hardware RAID or software? If the former, what is your controller?

    And get yourself a UPS. :)


    qts

    Tuesday, March 26, 2013 12:38 PM
  • ... Is this hardware RAID or software? ...

    It's pretty clear that the OP is talking about Windows RAID, Quentin. For example:

    I followed the instructions posted on Microsoft site for determining the volume and disk that had failed.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)

    Wednesday, March 27, 2013 1:49 AM
  • As a restoring is already performed, we may not have much step to do on this situation. As you have a backup, maybe a quick way is to simply format the new RAID5 and redo the restore.

    TechNet Subscriber Support in forum |If you have any feedback on our support, please contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Wednesday, March 27, 2013 12:06 PM
  • Hi, there and thank you for your reply.

    Ultimately, in the end, reformatting the new drive and starting the RAID-5 from scratch was the way I had to go. To clarify, this indeed is the software RAID built into the Windows Server. It works great it really is my fault for not having a battery backup to protect from power surges. There was a lot of corruption. Currently I am restoring my data from a variety of places and should have most of it back up. All family memories are preserved so that is the main thing. I can re-rip music and stuff.

    Sunday, March 31, 2013 5:48 PM