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running WHS on two computers on the same network RRS feed

  • Question

  • hi.
    is it possible to run two WHS on two computers but they are on the same network, i was reading some of the postings on this forum about having problems with this but they where running on HP boxes with i have the same problems.
    one other thing the second computer all ready have data on two of the three hard drive in it ( one drive for OS and two with music and movies) if i loaded WHS on it would all this data me gone?

    chilliman
    Friday, January 2, 2009 2:01 PM

Answers

  • It is possible, to have multiple WHS on one network, as long as they don't have the same name.
    The main limitations are:
    One client can only be connected to one WHS via connector at the same time.
    Remote access using various homeserver.com domains is limited, since at least port 4125 is hardcoded and therefore console access via Internet is only possible to one of your home servers directly.

    If you have data on the disks, while you wish to install Windows Home Server on a machine, all disks will be formatted and the data be gone. So phyically disconnect the disks containing data before installation or save the data to shared folders on your other home server before going on.
    After installation and Windows Updates are finished, you could attach the disks again and copy the files to subfolders of your shares through the shortcut Shared folders on server on the WHS desktop and later add these disks to the storage pool. The system disk should in this case be big enough to store at least the data from one of the disks on its DATA partition.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    • Marked as answer by chilliman-1 Friday, January 2, 2009 2:27 PM
    Friday, January 2, 2009 2:13 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • It is possible, to have multiple WHS on one network, as long as they don't have the same name.
    The main limitations are:
    One client can only be connected to one WHS via connector at the same time.
    Remote access using various homeserver.com domains is limited, since at least port 4125 is hardcoded and therefore console access via Internet is only possible to one of your home servers directly.

    If you have data on the disks, while you wish to install Windows Home Server on a machine, all disks will be formatted and the data be gone. So phyically disconnect the disks containing data before installation or save the data to shared folders on your other home server before going on.
    After installation and Windows Updates are finished, you could attach the disks again and copy the files to subfolders of your shares through the shortcut Shared folders on server on the WHS desktop and later add these disks to the storage pool. The system disk should in this case be big enough to store at least the data from one of the disks on its DATA partition.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    • Marked as answer by chilliman-1 Friday, January 2, 2009 2:27 PM
    Friday, January 2, 2009 2:13 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks Olaf.
    just one thing you about the DATA parition what size would that be ?

    disk 1 is 500GB with two paritions of 232gb each one 39.9 gb free and the other 174 gb free
    disk 2 is 500 GB  with 24.4 gb free
    would this be OK

    chilliman
    Friday, January 2, 2009 2:36 PM
  • When you install Windows Home Server, it formats the system disk with a 20 GB operating system partition (SYS, C: ) and the rest as the primary data partition (DATA, D: ), which serves as the starting point for the storage pool. The end user is not given control of this process.

    When you add another disk to your server's storage pool (connecting a disk doesn't automatically add it to the pool) WHS will format that disk with a single partition using all the space on the disk as an additional data partition (up to 2 TB, the limit for the MBR style of partition table used by WHS).

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Friday, January 2, 2009 2:55 PM
    Moderator
  • Windows Home Server setup creates two volumes on the primary disk: SYS is 20 GByte, DATA the remaining space on that disk.
    So it depends from the size of the disk, which you plan to use as the primary drive.
    If it is big enough to store the data from both partitions on disk 1, which you want to preserve, copying the data and then adding the disk to the storage pool to get enough space for the data on the second disk would work. Be carefull not to add the disk to the storage pool, which has still unsaved data.
    You should also consider the potential growth of data and better start with a larger drive.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Friday, January 2, 2009 2:55 PM
    Moderator