locked
Can't Open or View Files From a Volume Backup RRS feed

  • Question

  • My only WHS backup of a small C: partition won't open from any client WHS consoles.  Any thoughts? 

     

    Details:  I manually backed up a 1.8 GB NTFS active primary partition of a 300 GB drive which, when I later "successfully" restored using WHS Home Computer Restore CD, wouldn't boot and had read errors.  (The reason it's my only backup is because, after I backed it up, I converted it to FAT32 for multi-OS boot compatibility -- I use System Commander boot manager; thus, WHS won't include the partition in automatic backups.  My strategy was to restore the NTFS version of the partition if I needed to --  the content seldom changes, if ever -- then reconvert to FAT32.)

     

    So I tried to open the backup using two other computers, one WinXP and one Vista, to access and copy the files.  The Vista computer hangs on 92% complete in opening the backup.  (The Autoplay window opens briefly then disappears.)  The XP computer gets a black screen and reboots at around 90% complete.  Both computers open the backup of the D: partition for the same drive okay, so I don't think there's an issue with a driver for viewing the backup with the console from either computer.

     

    At this rate, WHS isn't working out as an easy, failsafe backup-restore solution.  It seems I need to make sure that I can open and view a backup before relying on it being safely in the can.  But that would be a tedious manual process, and apparently WHS can't automatically verify the integrity of backups.

    Wednesday, July 9, 2008 6:40 PM

Answers

  • Please have a look at the solution in the thread Re: "open backup" at 90%. I know it's a lot of work, you need additional storage space to secure your data, and I'm not sure it will work for you, however it's the only thing I can think of.

     

    And yes it's always a good idea to verify integrity / usability of a backup before relying on it. Actually I think opening the backups should be part of the first backup. I regulary open a backup for any of my client computers to be on the safe side. It takes away some of the ease of WHS, however it does give you peace of mind.

     

    Also if you need FAT32 for multiboot system just create small C drive for initial boot and install XP or whatever on another partition.

    • Marked as answer by Mick Mickle Thursday, November 20, 2008 5:00 PM
    Wednesday, July 9, 2008 10:57 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Please have a look at the solution in the thread Re: "open backup" at 90%. I know it's a lot of work, you need additional storage space to secure your data, and I'm not sure it will work for you, however it's the only thing I can think of.

     

    And yes it's always a good idea to verify integrity / usability of a backup before relying on it. Actually I think opening the backups should be part of the first backup. I regulary open a backup for any of my client computers to be on the safe side. It takes away some of the ease of WHS, however it does give you peace of mind.

     

    Also if you need FAT32 for multiboot system just create small C drive for initial boot and install XP or whatever on another partition.

    • Marked as answer by Mick Mickle Thursday, November 20, 2008 5:00 PM
    Wednesday, July 9, 2008 10:57 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks and sorry for the long delay in feedback.  As I get more experience with the nuances of WHS, I agree that each intitial volume backup should be opened with the console to make sure that it's retrievable from the outset.

    My very workable backup solution for a small multiboot FAT or FAT32 C drive while all other drives are NTFS:  Use Norton Ghost 14 to back C: up to a shared folder or a non-storage drive on the server and automatically copy the backup to an "offsite" location which is a "Backup Drive C Image" folder on the NTFS D drive where Windows is installed.  That way, WHS Backup continually backs up the FAT32 drive as part of drive D.  So in a data disaster situation, the C: image can be restored along with the rest of D:, then Ghost can restore C: on it's partition from the image on D: (plus, the extra C: image resides somewhere on the WHS server).

    Thursday, November 20, 2008 5:14 PM