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Getting warnings since a recent MS update RRS feed

  • Question

  • I've read other posts on this topic and know what the cut an paste response is.  I'm not interested in reading it again.  I understand that Microsoft has problems with software piracy.  Harassing your customers is not the solution.

    I bought my HP laptop with Office 2007 preinstalled over 2 years ago. No problems with validation since. As of the day after a Microsoft update about 10 days ago I started getting a message regarding validation when I start up Word or Excel.  It says my software cannot be validated.  When I click the "Get Help" button, it sends me to a web page where I'm asked to buy the software again. Not very helpful.

    Regarding my ID; over the past 2 years I've learned to live with Vista. That said, I see no real advantage over XP. Local network connectivity is much more complicated without being any better. To make it useable one has to disable the much touted security improvements.

    The proper solution to this specific issue is to roll back what ever was updated that is creating stress and frustration for your customers. It is bad business to require that they jump though hoops to get legal software when they've already paid for what they honestly believe to be legal software. Track down the real crook (I'm not sure there is one in my case) based on diagnostics data.  If you can't do that, improve the diagnostics data. Treat your customers as if they write your paycheck.

    That said, contact me via my MS live email and I will provide what information I have on my credit card statement regarding the purchase. When I bought the computer I was living in the US.  I have since moved to Mexco and have no idea where to find other purchase documents.

    I will continue to use the software as long as it works, ignoring the warnings.  If it stops working I'll switch to free Open Source equivalents offered every time I update FireFox.  Please pass this along to management.  MS is shooting itself in the foot with this latest update fiasco.

    FWIW my diagnostics are copied below.

    --
    Que le vaya bien...Steve

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0011.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    WGA Data-->
    Validation Status: Genuine
    Validation Code: 0

    Cached Validation Code: 0x0
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-27HYQ-XTKW2-WQD8Q
    Windows Product Key Hash: U8YEZzymoD4DMyaMb32rPrNIS90=
    Windows Product ID: 89578-OEM-7332157-00061
    Windows Product ID Type: 2
    Windows License Type: OEM SLP
    Windows OS version: 6.0.6001.2.00010300.1.0.003
    ID: {BBA800BE-55E5-4CE5-8176-6F934AA7F241}(1)
    Is Admin: Yes
    TestCab: 0x0
    WGA Version: Registered, 1.7.59.1
    Signed By: Microsoft
    Product Name: Windows Vista (TM) Home Premium
    Architecture: 0x00000000
    Build lab: 6001.vistasp1_gdr.090302-1506
    TTS Error:
    Validation Diagnostic:
    Resolution Status: N/A

    WgaER Data-->
    ThreatID(s): N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: 6.0.6001.18000

    WGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    File Exists: No
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: 2.0.48.0
    OGAExec.exe Signed By: Microsoft
    OGAAddin.dll Signed By: Microsoft

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 108 Invalid VLK
    Microsoft Office Enterprise 2007 - 108 Invalid VLK
    OGA Version: Registered, 2.0.48.0
    Signed By: Microsoft
    Office Diagnostics: 025D1FF3-364-80041010_025D1FF3-229-80041010_025D1FF3-230-1_025D1FF3-517-80040154_025D1FF3-237-80040154_025D1FF3-238-2_025D1FF3-244-80070002_025D1FF3-258-3_E2AD56EA-765-d003_E2AD56EA-766-0_E2AD56EA-134-80004005

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{BBA800BE-55E5-4CE5-8176-6F934AA7F241}</UGUID><Version>1.9.0011.0</Version><OS>6.0.6001.2.00010300.1.0.003</OS><Architecture>x32</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-WQD8Q</PKey><PID>89578-OEM-7332157-00061</PID><PIDType>2</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-312520123-2696304672-2950826586</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>Hewlett-Packard</Manufacturer><Model>HP Pavilion dv9000 (RU974UA#ABA)  </Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>Hewlett-Packard</Manufacturer><Version>F.3D    </Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="4"/><Date>20071122000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>58303507018400FE</HWID><UserLCID>0409</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Central Standard Time (Mexico)(GMT-06:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM><OEMID>HPQOEM</OEMID><OEMTableID>SLIC-MPC</OEMTableID></OEM><GANotification><File Name="OGAAddin.dll" Version="2.0.48.0"/></GANotification></MachineData><Software><Office><Result>108</Result><Products><Product GUID="{90120000-0030-0000-0000-0000000FF1CE}"><LegitResult>108</LegitResult><Name>Microsoft Office Enterprise 2007</Name><Ver>12</Ver><Val>61DFDA2DCAAB586</Val><Hash>w0/64ojWl2yB42CrcXbusqAQ1og=</Hash><Pid>89388-707-5481253-65665</Pid><PidType>14</PidType></Product></Products><Applications><App Id="15" Version="12" Result="108"/><App Id="16" Version="12" Result="108"/><App Id="18" Version="12" Result="108"/><App Id="19" Version="12" Result="108"/><App Id="1A" Version="12" Result="108"/><App Id="1B" Version="12" Result="108"/><App Id="44" Version="12" Result="108"/><App Id="A1" Version="12" Result="108"/><App Id="BA" Version="12" Result="108"/></Applications></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

    Spsys.log Content: 0x80070002

    Licensing Data-->
    Software licensing service version: 6.0.6001.18000
    Name: Windows(TM) Vista, HomePremium edition
    Description: Windows Operating System - Vista, OEM_SLP channel
    Activation ID: bffdc375-bbd5-499d-8ef1-4f37b61c895f
    Application ID: 55c92734-d682-4d71-983e-d6ec3f16059f
    Extended PID: 89578-00146-321-500061-02-1033-6000.0000-2632007
    Installation ID: 322863125485830744904561176092626334895543699155865796
    Processor Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=43473
    Machine Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=43474
    Use License URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=43476
    Product Key Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=43475
    Partial Product Key: WQD8Q
    License Status: Licensed

    HWID Data-->
    HWID Hash Current: OgAAAAEABgABAAEAAQABAAAAAwABAAEAJJQwewgDWtlqWWIeCuXUVEgk7nK83/L04gwO7h6orFb6/A==

    OEM Activation 1.0 Data-->
    N/A

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->
    BIOS valid for OA 2.0: yes
    Windows marker version: 0x20000
    OEMID and OEMTableID Consistent: yes
    BIOS Information:
      ACPI Table Name OEMID Value OEMTableID Value
      APIC   HP        APIC 
      FACP   HP      MCP51M 
      HPET   PTLTD   HPETTBL
      BOOT   HP  $SBFTBL$
      MCFG   HP        MCFG 
      SSDT   PTLTD   POWERNOW
      SLIC   HPQOEM  SLIC-MPC


    Steve
    Monday, September 21, 2009 9:42 PM

Answers

  • Hello UnhappyVistaUser,

    In your response to Carey you wrote, "I ordered it through an HP distributor on EBay with an excellent rating."

    OK, that explains it.  Up until reading that I was under the impression that you purchased this computer brand new from a real retailer or directly from HP.  Somewher along the line between the HP manufacturing facility and the eBay seller, a nongenuine installation of Office 2007 Enterprise was installed.  If I had to guess, I'd finger the eBay seller, as adding Office to a computer would look like "added value" when a buyer was making their buying decision.

    You wrote, "If the customer is cooperative offer them a way to resolve the issue without spending much if any money."  Microsoft is already doing this.  Under certain circumstances, people whose Office installations come up as nongenuine can qualify for either a discounted copy of Office (discounted by roughly 50%) or a complimentary copy of Office.

    The OGA Notifications Utility recently was overhauled and the enforcement level was racheted up to the same level that Windows XP's WGA has been for some time now.  If you look at the posting dates and volume in this forum, you can tell something changed, because the OGA forum was pretty "sleepy" up until around the first of the month, and we have been getting almost a page of posts each day, a big increase.  I have not yet seen the new OGA Notifications screens and I have not been able to find screen shots of them on microsoft.com, so I cannot offer an opinion on whether they are sufficiently customer-friendly or not....but I take it that your opinion is that are wanting in this aspect.

    One of your major points throughout this has been that you resent Microsoft for spreading the "pain" that they are feeling from nongenuine software, in the form of these unwelcome notices coming from their programs.  Let me tell you, there's very little pain there, because Office and Windows do not lose one iota of capability once they have been ID'd as nongenuine, no one's documents are erased, altered or changed by one byte, and the internet has plenty of sites that tell you how to uninstall the notifications.  Sure you get a little nag screen and your desktop background changes to black every hour, but you can ignore the nags and change it back to your kids, your dog, or whatever it was.

    A consumer product that is routinely counterfeited HAS TO have some sort of "pain" built in so that at least at some level the consumer has to factor into their buying decision whether what they are buying is Genuine or not.  If not, then company selling a product that anyone with a computer can dupe would soon go out of business.

    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Tuesday, September 22, 2009 5:41 PM
    Tuesday, September 22, 2009 1:04 PM

All replies

  • Hello UnhappyVistaUser,

    Using nongenuine software, which may have installed malicious software programs along with the application, has the potential to expose you, your private information, and other internet users to unnecessary risks.

    Given the above, it would be best for all concerned if you uninstalled your nongenuine installation of Office immediately, and installed the Open Source software you mentioned.
    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Monday, September 21, 2009 10:31 PM
  • Hi Dan,

    Thanks for taking time to respond.  Based on other posts I see that you are a MS stockholder who volunteers to help MS product users on the forums.  Much appreciated.

    I'd seriously like to hear how you, as a stockholder, feel about Microsoft's decision to put end users (their customers) on the front line in the battle against piracy. I understand that the company line is that the danger of malicious software makes the move necessary.  I and many others have a hard time buying that given that the company waited years before taking action.

    If I were a long term investor in MS shares I'd want management to rethink this strategy. It's a classic example of Wall Street thinking... putting short term gain (many users will bite the bullet and pay up) ahead of long term customer satisfaction and retention. The taste of that bullet won't be soon forgotten. If you're a long term investory, and I get the sense that you are, this is not what you want to see.

    I assume from your response that the Open Source products are not as good as the real thing.  I won't know until I'm forced to try them.  I learned to live with Vista, I'm sure I can learn to live with an Open Source word processor.  One thing for sure is that I'm not going to pay for the MS products again. I suspect you hear that a lot.

    Steve
    Tuesday, September 22, 2009 2:10 AM
  • What happens if you visit your bank and wish to to break or deposit a $100 bill and the bank determines the bill is counterfeit?  Do they give you a "genuine" $100 bill in return?  Of course not.  If you visit an authorized Rolex repair facility and they determine your Rolex watch is a knock-off, do they fix it?  Of course not.  If you purchased a new vehicle, later have an unfortunate accident and a repair shop replaced the deployed airbags with those which were not genuine, can you sue the automaker if the airbags failed to deploy in a subsequent accident?  If you purchased what seemed to be a "a deal to good to be true" for a Microsoft software product and it was determined to be non-genuine, can you sue Microsoft if the non-genuine software had malware imbedded in it that was snooping for your bank account or credit card numbers and transmitting such to, say, hackers located in Romania?  Get the drift?
    Carey Frisch
    Tuesday, September 22, 2009 2:33 AM
  • Hello UnhappyVistaUser,

    Personally I am a HUGE FAN of the Genuine Software program.  I think it strikes a reasonable balance between protection of the Company's intellectual property and respect for the customer's experience, although IMO the balance is in the customer's favor.

    I, too, would have loved to have seen it deployed years ago, but let's not fall for the conceit of assuming that what is technologically possible now was also technologically possible say five years ago.

    Your HP computer may have originally come from HP with an edition of Office 2007 installed, but chances are it came with a Trial edition of Office 2007, which would have expired after 60 days or 25 uses, IIRC.  There is a chance that it did come with a genuine full license for some edition of Office 2007, but that would have been at a hefty extra charge of at least $239 and up, unless of course it came with Office 2007 Home and Student, which is in the low $100 range.

    Regardless of what the computer may have come with, right now there is a nongenuine installation of Office 2007 Enterprise on it.  The computer certainly did not come from HP with this edition of Office 2007 on it.  Just out of curiosity, what did you pay for this software?  When you bought it, was it passed off as Office 2007 Professional, or did the seller plainly sell you Office Enterprise?

    Two things you wrote are happening already:  "Track down the real crook (I'm not sure there is one in my case) based on diagnostics data.  If you can't do that, improve the diagnostics data."

    You tell Microsoft to track down the real crook, yet you are reluctant to help in that effort by submitting a piracy report detailing the transaction, instead telling Microsoft to violate its own privacy policies and contact you for the information.  Then you tell Microsoft to "improve the diagnostics data" which they did with the latest release of the OGA Notifications Utility; the improved diagnostics is what picked up your nongenuine installation of Office.  Yet you want Microsoft to roll back this improvement:  "The proper solution to this specific issue is to roll back what ever was updated that is creating stress and frustration for your customers."

    You wrote, "Track down the real crook (I'm not sure there is one in my case)..."  I AM sure the real crook is the person who sold you the counterfeit software in the first place.  Please direct your anger to them.
    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Tuesday, September 22, 2009 3:28 AM
  • No, I don't get your drift.  I never asked for a “genuine” replacement, or a repair, or assurance that the apparently fake MS Office product I’ve been using will never fail, or for permission to file a frivolous lawsuit. Until your company chose to put its customers in the line of fire, I had no idea there was a problem.

    Now I’m asking to be left in peace with my fake software while your company goes about finding pirates, punishing pirates and ideally preventing piracy. I’m not a pirate and I didn’t get a “to good to be true” deal.  I paid over $900 for a laptop computer that had been introduced over a year and a half earlier. I ordered it through an HP distributor on EBay with an excellent rating. Comparable systems were listed by others at comparable prices.

    I ordered it because it was advertised as shipping with Windows XP, Entertainment Edition at a time when anything ordered directly from HP shipped with Vista. It was and is common for HP to ship systems with Office installed.  When the computer arrived, in an HP box, there was a notice on HP letterhead saying that my order had been upgraded to a later model (though far from the latest) and that Windows Vista was the standard OS for that model.

    I was unhappy and complained directly to HP.  In the end I found that he process for rolling back to XP was beyond my capabilities and I had sorted out the networking and video problems enough to make the system usable. You can confirm this by reading my November 2007 post on the topic "Vista Connectivity etc." where my desire to roll back to XP is discussed. Earlier posts address the networking and video issues.

    Now, over two years after I bought the computer, Microsoft has chosen to put me on the front line of its anti-piracy campaign. They have the nerve to allow an employee (or I assume you are) to imply that I’m at fault for purchasing "a deal to good to be true" without knowing anything about the purchase. 

    This is the kind of short term thinking that I was referring to in my response to Dan. A quality, long term oriented company never claims a customer is at fault unless they are 100% certain. That strategy is usually left to fly-by-night outfits and scam artists. I might now expect it from the guy who listed the computer on Ebay... but I expect better from Microsoft.

    If you need a signed letter from me stating that I won’t hold Microsoft accountable for any problem caused by the fake software, I’ll be happy to send one. Just leave me in peace to use what I paid for and stop accusing me of piracy.


    Steve
    Tuesday, September 22, 2009 4:07 AM
  • Hi Dan,

    I had not seen your response at the time I submitted the response below. In it you will see details of the purchase as I know them. I didn't buy Office separately. It was on the computer when I got it. The computer was advertised as including MS Office but I don't recall whether it said Professional or Enterprise. The primary attraction was that it came with Windows XP, which is what I was after. I was quite disappointed when it arrived with Vista, but I was already scheduled to return to Mexico, so decided to keep it at least until I returned.  When I returned to the US in November I was still looking for a way to roll back to XP.  Office was never a significant issue in my mind. Working in education I had previously used the Home and Student version. To this day I haven't used any of the modules except Word and Excel.

    I am not reluctant to report the transaction. However, based on reading other posts, documentation is required that I don't have.  Where would I attempt to do so? Upon searching I find that I don't even have the credit card statement I thought I had.  The card used was stolen in May of 2007. I don't have paper statements for the old card and my bank only shows online statements for the new card. :(  I left a post on EBay asking how to find a "buy" transaction from early 2007. It should be available, but I didn't find it. I'll be more than happy to report the EBay ID of the seller!

    I don't want Microsoft to roll back the OGA Notification Utility. I want it to use the information in a customer friendly way.  Let the customer know that there is a problem but don't link the "Get Help" button to a page where he or she is immediately told they must buy replacement software.  Why not link to a page that actually offers help?  A page explaining what was found and that the customer is a likely victim of fraud... even if you think they should have known better.  Then solicit help from the customer in the form of information regarding the purchase. 

    If the customer is cooperative offer them a way to resolve the issue without spending much if any money.  The end result is likely to be a customer with good things to say about Microsoft.  If they are not cooperative, disable the software and let them know what you've done and why. They won't be so positive about Microsoft, but I suspect they will be a distinct minority.

    The way the program is implemented it looks like a big scheme to boost revenue in light of a slow economy.  From a PR and long term customer satisfaction standpoint it is a disaster. That said, your shares may get a short term boost based on the additional revenue... that would be the time to sell IMO.

    Steve
    Tuesday, September 22, 2009 5:42 AM
  • Hello UnhappyVistaUser,

    In your response to Carey you wrote, "I ordered it through an HP distributor on EBay with an excellent rating."

    OK, that explains it.  Up until reading that I was under the impression that you purchased this computer brand new from a real retailer or directly from HP.  Somewher along the line between the HP manufacturing facility and the eBay seller, a nongenuine installation of Office 2007 Enterprise was installed.  If I had to guess, I'd finger the eBay seller, as adding Office to a computer would look like "added value" when a buyer was making their buying decision.

    You wrote, "If the customer is cooperative offer them a way to resolve the issue without spending much if any money."  Microsoft is already doing this.  Under certain circumstances, people whose Office installations come up as nongenuine can qualify for either a discounted copy of Office (discounted by roughly 50%) or a complimentary copy of Office.

    The OGA Notifications Utility recently was overhauled and the enforcement level was racheted up to the same level that Windows XP's WGA has been for some time now.  If you look at the posting dates and volume in this forum, you can tell something changed, because the OGA forum was pretty "sleepy" up until around the first of the month, and we have been getting almost a page of posts each day, a big increase.  I have not yet seen the new OGA Notifications screens and I have not been able to find screen shots of them on microsoft.com, so I cannot offer an opinion on whether they are sufficiently customer-friendly or not....but I take it that your opinion is that are wanting in this aspect.

    One of your major points throughout this has been that you resent Microsoft for spreading the "pain" that they are feeling from nongenuine software, in the form of these unwelcome notices coming from their programs.  Let me tell you, there's very little pain there, because Office and Windows do not lose one iota of capability once they have been ID'd as nongenuine, no one's documents are erased, altered or changed by one byte, and the internet has plenty of sites that tell you how to uninstall the notifications.  Sure you get a little nag screen and your desktop background changes to black every hour, but you can ignore the nags and change it back to your kids, your dog, or whatever it was.

    A consumer product that is routinely counterfeited HAS TO have some sort of "pain" built in so that at least at some level the consumer has to factor into their buying decision whether what they are buying is Genuine or not.  If not, then company selling a product that anyone with a computer can dupe would soon go out of business.

    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Tuesday, September 22, 2009 5:41 PM
    Tuesday, September 22, 2009 1:04 PM
  • Hi Dan,

    Sorry for the delay in responding.  I was waiting for the warning to pop up again so I could give you more details; it only pops up occasionally when you start an Office program.  The result is that the situation has either improved or was not as bad as I thought.

    The pop up box says "Please excuse this interruption. This copy of Office did not pass validation. Click Learn More for online details and help identifying the best way to get genuine Microsoft Office.".  So the button says "Learn More" not "Get Help" as I thought.

    Since your copy of Office will pass validation I'm not sure you can see the page I see.  Just in case here's the link...

    http://www.microsoft.com/genuine/office/nonGenuine.aspx?displaylang=en&cCode=MEX&Error=108&PartnerID=400&sGuid=3bf1fcbe-edb1-4655-89ff-6c532cbb7aef&submit=1

    On a wide screen monitor you see a main section and two boxes off to the right.  The center of the main section asks you to select which Office version you need.  When you choose you are taken to a pricing and order page.  Above that is a section that reads...

    "Many customers are surprised to learn that their Office software cannot be classified as genuine. Our goal is to help you understand the reasons why your copy did not pass validation, and to show you how you can address this situation. Click here"

    I would swear that the "click here" link is new!  This is why eye witness accounts should not be taken too seriously in a court of law.  If you do click you see a pop-up that IS helpful in explaining why this is happening.  I wish I'd seen it before.

    On the right are links to a glossary in one box and the link that I used to get to this forum in another box.

    The real kicker is that there is more to be seen below.  Only if you scroll down do you see some special offers in the main window and a link offering a complementary copy if you were deceived and are willing to file a report.  Today is the first time I've seen this, though I'm sure it was there and I just didn't think to scroll down.  One thing that could be done so that even dolts like me see the complementary offer would be to move the "Glossary" box down and the "complementary copy" box up.

    As for EBay, they only keep transaction records for 100 days according to someone on the user forum.  The last hope is that I have emails relating to the transaction stashed away somewhere.  If I do, they will contain the sellers ID and I will happily pass that information along to Microsoft.

    As I understand your post, I can keep clicking "Remind me later" until that cows come home and the two programs I use will keep working.  If that's the case, I got my hackles up without cause.  Sorry for wasting your time... but thanks for your courteous help and useful information.


    Steve
    Wednesday, September 23, 2009 3:37 PM
  • Hello UnhappyVistaUser,

    Thanks for your follow-up and the additional information.  You're right, I did not see what you saw on the screen since my Office passed.  Funny thing, on one of my experimental machines I was planning to install an old VLK disc of Office 2003 I have lying around using a bad key that I'd just grab off of the internet just to see for myself the latest rendition of the OGA Notifier screens.

    You are not the first person to post here saying that they were having trouble finding out how to submit their materials for the complimentary offer after reading about it in the FAQ, so it's possible the web developers for the OGA Failure pages need to give their pages a relook and re-arrange the furniture a bit. :-)

    Can you tell me something about what is displayed about the complimentary offer?  Does the wording seem to say that any hi-quality counterfeit software might qualify for the offer, or does it place a limitation on the offer such that only Office that was preinstalled will qualify?  This is an important distinction, because that's how MS does it with the Windows Complimentary offer.  Here's my turn to say "I could have sworn that it said such and such on the screen..." because I could have sworn that the FAQ for the Office Genuine Offer at one time limited the complimentary offer to copies of office that were preinstalled.  If they did limit it to preinstalled software, that would eliminate eligibility for the complimentary offer for all those people who bought Office in fake retail packages on eBay.

    Speaking of eBay, you're right about them not keeping records for long, but if you paid with PayPal, your PayPal account keeps your records for much longer, so check your PayPal account payment history.
    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Wednesday, September 23, 2009 4:06 PM