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NAND drives: Bye-bye, HDD? RRS feed

  • Question

  • It's nice to know that 2007 will finally bring one of the most coveted advances in computing -- the solid-state hard drive. The appeal of solid-state drives (SSD) is plain: They're lighter, faster, quieter and less power-hungry than conventional notebook hard disk drives (HDD), and they won't break if you drop them. NAND is the storage technology that will drive SSDs, making it one of the key technologies to watch in 2007.
    NAND (which stands for "Not and") is a type of flash memory technology that excels at reading, writing and erasing data from flash memory. NOR (short for "Not or") is the other type of flash-based storage and is better suited for retrieving data from smaller devices like cell phones. NAND's strengths make it ideally suited for larger-storage drives.
    Recognizing the appeal of solid-state mass-storage drives, a number of memory manufacturers have begun to develop flash memory drives for inclusion in laptops and other portable devices. In early 2006, Samsung Corp. announced the development of a  32 MB NAND drivethat it touted as a "hard-drive" killer, and both Samsung and Sony Corp. have released notebooks with flash-based drives in Asia. A number of other notebook manufacturers, including Toshiba Corp. and Lenovo Group Ltd., have expressed a desire to integrate memory drives into notebook computers.
    Recent reports have indicated that solid-state hard drives are being built with data throughput capacity of up to 32 MB/secThis is close to 100 times faster than conventional hard drives.
    The kicker? The 32GB drive that SanDisk Corp. claims is capable of these speeds has a 1.8-in. design. Finally, because of their small size and lack of moving parts, NAND drives consume a fraction of the energy and generate a small percentage of the heat of standard disk-based drives.
    The downside of NAND drives is that these tiny drives cost upwards of $500 or $600. That's a lot of budget room to spend on a 32GB drive, which explains why technology hasn't been implemented in more laptop configurations.
    Sunday, March 11, 2007 8:50 PM

Answers

  • hey nice info.. hard disks are finally seeing some change...
    Thursday, March 15, 2007 1:08 PM
  • 100 times faster great .. it will be rocking
    Thursday, March 15, 2007 6:26 PM
  •  Karthik_Kastury_21b8b6 wrote:
    hey nice info.. hard disks are finally seeing some change...

    so wat you guys say.... wat will you do to your HDD?

    Thursday, March 15, 2007 9:42 PM
  • we will still keep our HDD, as the initial cost of NAND drives will be very high.
    Monday, March 19, 2007 11:11 AM
  •  Sanket_Shah_734609 wrote:
    we will still keep our HDD, as the initial cost of NAND drives will be very high.

    yea.... but later NAND is  goin to rule...

    Monday, March 19, 2007 2:06 PM

All replies

  • hey nice info.. hard disks are finally seeing some change...
    Thursday, March 15, 2007 1:08 PM
  • 100 times faster great .. it will be rocking
    Thursday, March 15, 2007 6:26 PM
  •  Karthik_Kastury_21b8b6 wrote:
    hey nice info.. hard disks are finally seeing some change...

    so wat you guys say.... wat will you do to your HDD?

    Thursday, March 15, 2007 9:42 PM
  • yes
    Sunday, March 18, 2007 3:05 PM
  • we will still keep our HDD, as the initial cost of NAND drives will be very high.
    Monday, March 19, 2007 11:11 AM
  •  Sanket_Shah_734609 wrote:
    we will still keep our HDD, as the initial cost of NAND drives will be very high.

    yea.... but later NAND is  goin to rule...

    Monday, March 19, 2007 2:06 PM
  • NAND drives are costly compared to HDD so it will take time...........
    Tuesday, March 20, 2007 12:41 AM