locked
WHS v1: Replace system HDD with S SD RRS feed

  • Question

  • Gentlemen,

    I have searched the forum without success, but if this is already answered somewhere please point me in the right direction.

    I run a homebrew WHS v1, It's been running for som etime and I'm quite happy with the setup. But I have warnings about the system disc in the console, it seems to be wearing down and it's only a matter of time before the system disc fails. So I thought I might replace it with a SSD. Now, when you want to replace the disk in a, let's say a laptop, you can transfer the content of the HDD to the SSD, so the SSD becomes a bluprint of the HDD, put the SSD into the laptop, and it runs like nothing ever happened.

    Is this at all possible on WHS v1? If so, what's the requirement for someting like this to work? The exact same size (SDD GB = HDD GB)? 



    • Edited by tols1 Monday, June 11, 2012 7:00 PM
    Monday, June 11, 2012 7:53 AM

Answers

  • Cloning the system disk of WHS is an unsupported scenario, and if you do it anyway, you need some software, which allows you to clone the disk ID either.

    I would not recommend an SSD - since consumer SSDs are not designed for server usage, and the old WHS does not support natively SSDs, you may run into some compatibility issues. (Especially if the D: drive becomes loaded near the end of its capacity, the SSD may not work as intended for wear leveling.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf

    • Marked as answer by tols1 Monday, June 11, 2012 7:00 PM
    Monday, June 11, 2012 8:34 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Cloning the system disk of WHS is an unsupported scenario, and if you do it anyway, you need some software, which allows you to clone the disk ID either.

    I would not recommend an SSD - since consumer SSDs are not designed for server usage, and the old WHS does not support natively SSDs, you may run into some compatibility issues. (Especially if the D: drive becomes loaded near the end of its capacity, the SSD may not work as intended for wear leveling.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf

    • Marked as answer by tols1 Monday, June 11, 2012 7:00 PM
    Monday, June 11, 2012 8:34 AM
    Moderator
  • Ok, thank you for your quick reply.

    I will have to do a server reinstall with a new HDD then.

    Monday, June 11, 2012 8:55 AM
  • ...and what about WHS 2011? I'm planning to replace the system reserved and boot partition with a small SSD (60GB). What about that?

    Thanks from Germany as well...


    Thomas Pagel

    Monday, June 11, 2012 6:01 PM
  • Without altering the installation files the installer will reject to install WHS 2011 on any disk smaller than 160 GB.

    It might work, since WHS 2011 isnt that sensitive about the disk ID, but consumer SSDs are not really designed for the activity of a server OS.

    (Especially small disks - my normal Windows 2008R2 servers with a 50 GB system volume are not far away from getting full without much additional software installed - Dell always seems to select a too small system volume size on long term use.)

    Since a SSD mainly improves the disk read and write performance and this is usually not the bottleneck for WHS it makes not too much sense anyway.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf

    Monday, June 11, 2012 9:25 PM
    Moderator
  • Well, read/write preformance is one issue, another is the lifetime of the disk. In my experience HDD will run for 2-5 years depending on usage (my stationary PC have actually been running since 2006 but it's been rarely used the last couple of years, while one of the disks in the WHS died after a couple of years, my wifes Packard Bell laptop HDD crashed after just over 2 years).

    It's a pain to reinstall the server after a crash. If you're unlucky you will have to do a reinstall every 2-3 years with HDD system disc. I suppose SSD will run a lot longer than this(?).

    But this is a bit OT... I've settled down with a new HDD system in my system.

    Tuesday, June 12, 2012 10:42 AM
  • Hi,

    I'm not sure, since there are no long term reliability tests available for consumer grade SSDs. And it has been told, that SSDs have a limited number of write cycles for each cell. This is compensated by some logic of the controller to use the various cells and not always the same, but it may still be matter, especially on a system, which is almost always on and performs writes to the file system.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf

    Tuesday, June 12, 2012 2:58 PM
    Moderator
  • Ah, ok. If the writecycle is a limited "resource" then it makes sence :)

    Thank you again.

    Tuesday, June 12, 2012 3:41 PM
  • ...so my concept was only using it for the system drive. I even might switch of the pagefile (since I have enough memory in it) so it should be most read access. I also use "Lights Out" so it's not "always on"... I 100% share your concerns but the only thing I want is a faster wake up time from hibernate and faster response on opening the dashboard...

    Thomas Pagel

    Tuesday, June 12, 2012 3:50 PM