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Cannot use product code RRS feed

  • Question

  • ok i have tried all the option you have requested to try out before contacting you. Unfortunately the key i have is not being accepted. Perhaps i should advise the situation first as to how this arised. I needed to change the processor as the pins had become bent while removing for cleaning. This led to a new motherboard, dual core processor, new pci graphics card and hard drive and RAM so you can imagine my amazement when they said my very nice previously hand made computer was at the end of its life. SO all installed including what i believed to be my original winxp with COA product code. Now its telling me the code on the computer does not match the code on my original COA. Ive tried to change it with your software but it tells me that it cannot be done. My certificate has windows XP professional 1-2 CPU HPQ at the top and yes originally it was a HP computer and you can probably tell from this that I have had this code for a number of years. Your help would be apprecited.Pleaasssee dont tell me to reinstall its been hard work getting all my programmes etc back on.
    Tuesday, August 19, 2008 4:05 PM

Answers

  • NoSacrifice,

    The license for XP you are installing is an OEM license from a major manufacturer, Hewlett-Packard/Compaq.

    OEM licenses for XP are valid only on the computer onto which the license is first installed, and that license cannot be moved to another computer (unlike the retail license, which can be moved from one computer to another).

    For the purposes of defining what a computer is, since a computer is just a collection of parts, MS has established that the motherboard is the base component that defines a computer.  Therefore, an OEM license cannot be moved from one motherboard to another.

    When the old computer or motheboard is no longer in service due to obsolesence, the associated OEM license "dies" with the computer or motherboard.

    There is one exception to the above policy, and that is to accommodate a situation where the original motherboard was replaced because it was defective.

    So, under the circumstances you describe, you would not be allowed to move the original OEM license for XP from your old HP motherboard to a new motherboard, since the reason for the move is not that the original has become defective.  What was defective were the pins on the processor, and as such a simple apples-for-apples replacement of the processor itself would have bene fine from a licensing standpoint.

    In order to run Windows on the newly revamped computer, you need to purchase another license, either retail or systembuilder/OEM, and install that license on the newly revamped computer.

    From what you describe, the computer may have enough horsepower to run Windows Vista.


    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    • Marked as answer by Stephen Holm Tuesday, August 19, 2008 5:26 PM
    Tuesday, August 19, 2008 4:31 PM

All replies

  • NoSacrifice,

    The license for XP you are installing is an OEM license from a major manufacturer, Hewlett-Packard/Compaq.

    OEM licenses for XP are valid only on the computer onto which the license is first installed, and that license cannot be moved to another computer (unlike the retail license, which can be moved from one computer to another).

    For the purposes of defining what a computer is, since a computer is just a collection of parts, MS has established that the motherboard is the base component that defines a computer.  Therefore, an OEM license cannot be moved from one motherboard to another.

    When the old computer or motheboard is no longer in service due to obsolesence, the associated OEM license "dies" with the computer or motherboard.

    There is one exception to the above policy, and that is to accommodate a situation where the original motherboard was replaced because it was defective.

    So, under the circumstances you describe, you would not be allowed to move the original OEM license for XP from your old HP motherboard to a new motherboard, since the reason for the move is not that the original has become defective.  What was defective were the pins on the processor, and as such a simple apples-for-apples replacement of the processor itself would have bene fine from a licensing standpoint.

    In order to run Windows on the newly revamped computer, you need to purchase another license, either retail or systembuilder/OEM, and install that license on the newly revamped computer.

    From what you describe, the computer may have enough horsepower to run Windows Vista.


    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    • Marked as answer by Stephen Holm Tuesday, August 19, 2008 5:26 PM
    Tuesday, August 19, 2008 4:31 PM
  • Thanks for the reply and not so comforting information. I should point out that the mother board had been changed previously to this install twice and I have never had this problem before. Why should I now? I believe that if I format the hard drive and reinstall I will be able to reinstallWindows XP. The problem as mentioned before is the fact that it taken me a long time to get all the programmes reinstalled I  am sure there is a way around this so please confirm that i will have to buy I am not a rich retired person. Look like I will have to run it without validation or reinstall.
    Tuesday, August 19, 2008 5:04 PM
  • NoSacrifice said:

     I  am sure there is a way around this so please confirm that i will have to buy I am not a rich retired person. Look like I will have to run it without validation or reinstall.


    There may be "a way around this" but that information is certainly not going to be posted at the Microsoft Genuine Advantage website.

    According to the End User Licensing Agreement, your HP license for XP is no longer valid because it's no longer installed on an HP computer

    You may not be a "rich retired person" but you were rich enough to buy a new motherboard, a new dual core processor, new ram, and a new video card.  It would not be "right" or "moral" to steal any of those components from the company who made them, and neither is it right or moral to steal the operating system from the company who published it.

    Speaking as a private individual (I am not a MS employee but I am a shareholder), my advice to you would be to redistribute the budet established for the newly revamped computer to allow for the cost of a new license for Windows.  But if you are not going to do that, I would rather you use an alternative free OS like Linux than use a pirated copy of XP.
    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Tuesday, August 19, 2008 8:33 PM
  • Thanks for your reply I do not use pirated copies of anything, as far as I know.  I do understand your point of view all credit to you.
    Thursday, August 21, 2008 1:27 PM
  • By the way although I understand your sentiments you do not know my financial situation, I did not say I was poor but i did say I am not rich. Believe it or not many people work on budgets these days and cannot all afford to purchase shares.
    Thursday, August 21, 2008 1:55 PM