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Share ur knowledge abt Windows XP... RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi Guys,

    Lets share our knowledge about Windows XP here.. Describe what you kow - Bugs, intricacies ,Tips, etc...

     

     

    Monday, May 28, 2007 1:30 AM

Answers

  • Try this ...

     

    At times , when you empty your recycle bin, the icon in title bar will not be refreshed ...

     

    Delete a Briefcase to the Recycle Bin.Now, "Empty recycle bin".. You will notice that, the icon in the title bar is not refreshed to indicate a empty bin.. Rather, the same filled bin icon would be there.. This visual error happens for some types of files...

     

    But if you would select "Delete" by right clicking the Briefcase in the Recycle Bin, the icon  in the title bar will be updated...

     

    Funny, isn't is???

    Monday, May 28, 2007 1:35 AM
  • here is a useful trip

    many people would have noticed that if any program ends abruptly u get a dialog box saying that would u like to report it to microsoft....it is really irritating.....this is how u can disable it

     


    1. Open Control Panel
    2. Click on Performance and Maintenance.
    3. Click on System.
    4. Then click on the Advanced tab
    5. Click on the error-reporting button on the bottom of the windows.
    6. Select Disable error reporting.
    7. Click OK
    8. Click OK

    Monday, May 28, 2007 2:12 PM
  • @ Adithya - I think it is better not to disable error -reporting.. Once you report your error, if the error is already in the database, they would provide you with the cause of the error and the update to prevent those errors from occuring in future.. Even if it is not in the database, they will look into the matter and take remedial measures...

     

    Error reporting is a feature for our benefit., So make good use of it...

     

    Ofcourse, those who don't have a internet connection can disable it...

    Monday, May 28, 2007 2:33 PM
  • but it is sometimes not secure to send ur info ......they say it is secure but it isnt
    Monday, May 28, 2007 2:43 PM
  • yes, error reporting is for us.

    now knowledge from my side.

    msconfig.

    type it on command prompt.
    a window will open where you can choose which services etc you want to start by windows while booting.
    this way you can also reduce booting time
    Monday, May 28, 2007 2:45 PM
  • here's one more tip

     

    File sharing. Is the sharing of a disk or printer between computers . If a disk or folder is shared, everyone on the network can access it. You have the ability to set password and permissions for the shared disk or folder for security therefore Windows XP tries to protect you from some potential security risks.
    Right click the disk or folder that you want to share and select Sharing and Security.

    NOTE: The first time you do this the Networking wizard will appear ..CLOSE IT..:-



    The Wizard automatically enables the Internet Connection Firewall (ICF) to prevent other Internet users from accessing your shared disks and folders. Enabling ICF is a good idea if you connect directly to the Internet through a dial-up, DSL, or cable modem. But it's a terrible idea if you connect to the Internet through your LAN, using a software router (like Internet Connection Sharing) or a hardware router, since it will block File and Printer Sharing.

    The disk or folder that you share, along with all of the folders that it contains, will be accessible by other network users. If you're sharing an entire disk, Windows XP gives a warning. The implication of the warning is that it's better to share a specific folder, since only that folder (and its subfolders) will be accessible by others, and the rest of the disk will be inaccessible. Click where indicated if you want to go ahead and share the entire disk. This screen doesn't appear if you're sharing a folder.



    XP will display a warning. If you want ICF enabled, select Use the wizard to enable file sharing. Otherwise, select Just enable file sharing.

     
    Having successfully stopped the Wizard's , you now have to specify a Share name, which users on other networked computers will use to access this disk or folder. For maximum compatibility with all versions of Windows, use 1-12 characters.

    By default, users on other computers have full access: they can read, write, and delete shared files. If you only want them to be able to read files, un-check Allow network users to change my files.

    Warning: If a user has full access, deleting a file doesn't put it in the Recycle Bin. Once it's deleted, it's gone for good.

     


    The Wizard automatically enables the Internet Connection Firewall (ICF) to prevent other Internet users from accessing your shared disks and folders. Enabling ICF is a good idea if you connect directly to the Internet through a dial-up, DSL, or cable modem. But it's a terrible idea if you connect to the Internet through your LAN, using a software router (like Internet Connection Sharing) or a hardware router, since it will block File and Printer Sharing.

    The disk or folder that you share, along with all of the folders that it contains, will be accessible by other network users. If you're sharing an entire disk, Windows XP gives a warning. The implication of the warning is that it's better to share a specific folder, since only that folder (and its subfolders) will be accessible by others, and the rest of the disk will be inaccessible. Click where indicated if you want to go ahead and share the entire disk. This screen doesn't appear if you're sharing a folder.



    XP will display a warning. If you want ICF enabled, select Use the wizard to enable file sharing. Otherwise, select Just enable file sharing.

     
    Having successfully stopped the Wizard's , you now have to specify a Share name, which users on other networked computers will use to access this disk or folder. For maximum compatibility with all versions of Windows, use 1-12 characters.

    By default, users on other computers have full access: they can read, write, and delete shared files. If you only want them to be able to read files, un-check Allow network users to change my files.

    Warning: If a user has full access, deleting a file doesn't put it in the Recycle Bin. Once it's deleted, it's gone for good.

     
    Hiding a Shared Disk or Folder
    What if you don't want everyone on the network to be able to access a shared disk or folder?

    The answer is to create a hidden share by adding a dollar sign ('$') to the end of the share name. A hidden share doesn't appear in My Network Places or Network Neighborhood on any of the networked computers. Only people who know the share name can access it.

    To create a hidden share, right click the disk or folder and select Sharing and Security.

    Specify a share name that ends with a dollar sign. Once again, use 1-12 characters (1-11 before the dollar sign). If the people on your network are clever enough to guess a name like myfiles$, use a more secure name, like a combination of letters and numbers. Just make sure that you can remember it.

    Mapping Hidden Drives
    Accessing a Hidden Share:
    A hidden share doesn't appear on any of the networked computers, so how can someone on another computer access it? The answer is to map it as a network drive, which assigns a drive letter to the hidden share. Once it has a drive letter, you access it just like a disk on the same computer.

    To map a network drive, open My Computer, click Tools, and select Map Network Drive.



    Specify an unused drive letter and enter the network path for the hidden share, being sure to include the dollar sign. If you check Reconnect at logon, the mapping will happen automatically every time you start your computer. Otherwise, you'll have to map it manually every time

    Monday, May 28, 2007 2:45 PM
  • @ Adithya - One request to you- Please avoid these yellow and red colours.. Post the answers in normal text.. These yellow and red irritates my eyes.. Please consider this plea when you post in the future...
    Tuesday, May 29, 2007 4:06 AM
  • You can't create the following folders in Windows CON, NUL, COM1, COM2, COM3, LPT1, LPT2, LPT3,COM1 to COM9 and LPT1 to LPT9....
    The reason is that con, prn, lpt1..lpt9, etc are underlying devices from the time dos was written..
    con means console
    prn means printer
    .....
    So if u r allowed to create such folders, there will be an ambiguity in where to write data when the data is supposed to go to the specified devices.To print something, internally what windows does is, writes the data to the folder(virtually u can call it a folder, i.e virtual folders in device level) 'prn'.

    However, this can still be done:

    1) go to run dialog.
    2) type cmd/command (command prompt gets opened)
    3) go to root directory like C:\ or D:\ etc
    4) type md \\.\\c:\\con

    This is a UNC path (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Naming_Convention). Because these didn't exist under pure DOS, they don't have to be backward compatible (and \\remotehost\drive:\con doesn't make sense anyway, because without having a process on the remote host, there is no current 'console'). It would be a security hazard as well, having the serial and parallel ports accessible for everyone who is allowed to read or write in any single directory.
    Tuesday, May 29, 2007 5:21 AM
  • @ raghuram....yaa i will consider ur request next time i post anything...
    Tuesday, May 29, 2007 6:37 AM
  • Well seems similar to my post...almost same..

     

    anyways ... good info about UNC, but it is highly risky and u cannot delet it once created.....

    Tuesday, May 29, 2007 7:54 AM
  • You can delete the file or folder as "rmdir \\.\e:\con"
    Tuesday, May 29, 2007 8:58 AM
  • Automated System Recovery (ASR)

    Complete the steps outlined below to utilize XP's Automated System Recovery (ASR) functionality.

    Scope:

    Dual Partitions (C and D)
    XP installed on C

    Backup

    1. Go to the Start button/All Programs/Accessories/System Tools/Backup
    2. Select the Advanced Mode link within the Backup wizard.
    3. Click the Automated System Restore Wizard button.
    4. Point the backup media file name to the D drive rename the backup file asr (d:\asr.bkf). (*Do not point the backup to the C drive where XP is installed because during the Restore mode the C drive will be formatted) Click Next and then click Finish. ASR will start it's System State backup (which copies all system files and registry configuration)
    5. After the backup of the system state is completed (approx 5-10 minutes), You will be prompted to insert a floppy disk into the A drive. Click OK. XP will complete the ASR backup.

    * ASR will only backup the system state (windows folder) and registry configuration. You must return to Backup and create a separate backup of your valued data to the D drive.

    Restore

    In the event that your system becomes inaccessible and/or System Restore does not function properly, complete these steps.

    1. Make sure the system can boot from a CD-Rom (via the bios setup)
    2. Insert the Windows XP CD-Rom into the drive
    3. Insert the ASR Floppy disk into the drive
    4. Power up the computer
    5. Press the enter key when prompted to "press any key to run from the CD-rom"
    6. Press F2 on the keyboard when prompted to start the ASR recovery action.
    7. XP will format the C drive
    8. The computer will restart
    9. Let windows XP start automatically (do not press a key to run from the CD rom).
    10. XP will go through the basic plug and play discovery and copy setup files to the C drive.
    11. The computer will restart and boot into XP
    12. The ASR wizard will start and automatically point to the asr.bkf file on the D drive. Click OK to restore the system state and registry configuration.
    13. When completed XP will either present the login screen or login to the desktop automatically (depending on the configuration at the time the ASR backup was initiated).
    14. Return to the Backup wizard to restore any valued data that was saved beforehand to the D drive.

    Benefits of using ASR

    Timesaver = Entire restore process takes less than 30 minutes.
    Configuration in tact = Desktop and user preference settings will be maintained.
    Redundancy = Provides an additional restore option besides System Restore.
    Registry = Backs up and restores the entire current registry configuration settings.

    Drawbacks of using ASR

    Does not restore any installed programs from the program Files folder.
    Does not work on a single partition.

    Completing an ASR backup on a regular basis will provide additional control over the outcome of a system failure.

    Wednesday, May 30, 2007 10:24 AM
  • If you want to quickly view a supported format audio/video file, and don't want to wait until Media Player loads, you can create a new action for these file types in Explorer under Tools/Folder Options/File Types/Advanced/New, called e.g. "Preview", with "C:\Windows\System32\Mplay32.exe" /Play "%L" as application specification.
    Wednesday, May 30, 2007 10:28 AM
  • click start
    open run and type services.msc

    then double click on help and support
    change the startup type to manual

    if you are not using automatic updates then
    double click on automatic updates and then
    set the startup to manual




    By doing this you save some precious Ram of your computer

    Wednesday, May 30, 2007 12:39 PM

All replies

  • Try this ...

     

    At times , when you empty your recycle bin, the icon in title bar will not be refreshed ...

     

    Delete a Briefcase to the Recycle Bin.Now, "Empty recycle bin".. You will notice that, the icon in the title bar is not refreshed to indicate a empty bin.. Rather, the same filled bin icon would be there.. This visual error happens for some types of files...

     

    But if you would select "Delete" by right clicking the Briefcase in the Recycle Bin, the icon  in the title bar will be updated...

     

    Funny, isn't is???

    Monday, May 28, 2007 1:35 AM
  • here is a useful trip

    many people would have noticed that if any program ends abruptly u get a dialog box saying that would u like to report it to microsoft....it is really irritating.....this is how u can disable it

     


    1. Open Control Panel
    2. Click on Performance and Maintenance.
    3. Click on System.
    4. Then click on the Advanced tab
    5. Click on the error-reporting button on the bottom of the windows.
    6. Select Disable error reporting.
    7. Click OK
    8. Click OK

    Monday, May 28, 2007 2:12 PM
  • @ Adithya - I think it is better not to disable error -reporting.. Once you report your error, if the error is already in the database, they would provide you with the cause of the error and the update to prevent those errors from occuring in future.. Even if it is not in the database, they will look into the matter and take remedial measures...

     

    Error reporting is a feature for our benefit., So make good use of it...

     

    Ofcourse, those who don't have a internet connection can disable it...

    Monday, May 28, 2007 2:33 PM
  • but it is sometimes not secure to send ur info ......they say it is secure but it isnt
    Monday, May 28, 2007 2:43 PM
  • yes, error reporting is for us.

    now knowledge from my side.

    msconfig.

    type it on command prompt.
    a window will open where you can choose which services etc you want to start by windows while booting.
    this way you can also reduce booting time
    Monday, May 28, 2007 2:45 PM
  • here's one more tip

     

    File sharing. Is the sharing of a disk or printer between computers . If a disk or folder is shared, everyone on the network can access it. You have the ability to set password and permissions for the shared disk or folder for security therefore Windows XP tries to protect you from some potential security risks.
    Right click the disk or folder that you want to share and select Sharing and Security.

    NOTE: The first time you do this the Networking wizard will appear ..CLOSE IT..:-



    The Wizard automatically enables the Internet Connection Firewall (ICF) to prevent other Internet users from accessing your shared disks and folders. Enabling ICF is a good idea if you connect directly to the Internet through a dial-up, DSL, or cable modem. But it's a terrible idea if you connect to the Internet through your LAN, using a software router (like Internet Connection Sharing) or a hardware router, since it will block File and Printer Sharing.

    The disk or folder that you share, along with all of the folders that it contains, will be accessible by other network users. If you're sharing an entire disk, Windows XP gives a warning. The implication of the warning is that it's better to share a specific folder, since only that folder (and its subfolders) will be accessible by others, and the rest of the disk will be inaccessible. Click where indicated if you want to go ahead and share the entire disk. This screen doesn't appear if you're sharing a folder.



    XP will display a warning. If you want ICF enabled, select Use the wizard to enable file sharing. Otherwise, select Just enable file sharing.

     
    Having successfully stopped the Wizard's , you now have to specify a Share name, which users on other networked computers will use to access this disk or folder. For maximum compatibility with all versions of Windows, use 1-12 characters.

    By default, users on other computers have full access: they can read, write, and delete shared files. If you only want them to be able to read files, un-check Allow network users to change my files.

    Warning: If a user has full access, deleting a file doesn't put it in the Recycle Bin. Once it's deleted, it's gone for good.

     


    The Wizard automatically enables the Internet Connection Firewall (ICF) to prevent other Internet users from accessing your shared disks and folders. Enabling ICF is a good idea if you connect directly to the Internet through a dial-up, DSL, or cable modem. But it's a terrible idea if you connect to the Internet through your LAN, using a software router (like Internet Connection Sharing) or a hardware router, since it will block File and Printer Sharing.

    The disk or folder that you share, along with all of the folders that it contains, will be accessible by other network users. If you're sharing an entire disk, Windows XP gives a warning. The implication of the warning is that it's better to share a specific folder, since only that folder (and its subfolders) will be accessible by others, and the rest of the disk will be inaccessible. Click where indicated if you want to go ahead and share the entire disk. This screen doesn't appear if you're sharing a folder.



    XP will display a warning. If you want ICF enabled, select Use the wizard to enable file sharing. Otherwise, select Just enable file sharing.

     
    Having successfully stopped the Wizard's , you now have to specify a Share name, which users on other networked computers will use to access this disk or folder. For maximum compatibility with all versions of Windows, use 1-12 characters.

    By default, users on other computers have full access: they can read, write, and delete shared files. If you only want them to be able to read files, un-check Allow network users to change my files.

    Warning: If a user has full access, deleting a file doesn't put it in the Recycle Bin. Once it's deleted, it's gone for good.

     
    Hiding a Shared Disk or Folder
    What if you don't want everyone on the network to be able to access a shared disk or folder?

    The answer is to create a hidden share by adding a dollar sign ('$') to the end of the share name. A hidden share doesn't appear in My Network Places or Network Neighborhood on any of the networked computers. Only people who know the share name can access it.

    To create a hidden share, right click the disk or folder and select Sharing and Security.

    Specify a share name that ends with a dollar sign. Once again, use 1-12 characters (1-11 before the dollar sign). If the people on your network are clever enough to guess a name like myfiles$, use a more secure name, like a combination of letters and numbers. Just make sure that you can remember it.

    Mapping Hidden Drives
    Accessing a Hidden Share:
    A hidden share doesn't appear on any of the networked computers, so how can someone on another computer access it? The answer is to map it as a network drive, which assigns a drive letter to the hidden share. Once it has a drive letter, you access it just like a disk on the same computer.

    To map a network drive, open My Computer, click Tools, and select Map Network Drive.



    Specify an unused drive letter and enter the network path for the hidden share, being sure to include the dollar sign. If you check Reconnect at logon, the mapping will happen automatically every time you start your computer. Otherwise, you'll have to map it manually every time

    Monday, May 28, 2007 2:45 PM
  • @ Adithya - One request to you- Please avoid these yellow and red colours.. Post the answers in normal text.. These yellow and red irritates my eyes.. Please consider this plea when you post in the future...
    Tuesday, May 29, 2007 4:06 AM
  • You can't create the following folders in Windows CON, NUL, COM1, COM2, COM3, LPT1, LPT2, LPT3,COM1 to COM9 and LPT1 to LPT9....
    The reason is that con, prn, lpt1..lpt9, etc are underlying devices from the time dos was written..
    con means console
    prn means printer
    .....
    So if u r allowed to create such folders, there will be an ambiguity in where to write data when the data is supposed to go to the specified devices.To print something, internally what windows does is, writes the data to the folder(virtually u can call it a folder, i.e virtual folders in device level) 'prn'.

    However, this can still be done:

    1) go to run dialog.
    2) type cmd/command (command prompt gets opened)
    3) go to root directory like C:\ or D:\ etc
    4) type md \\.\\c:\\con

    This is a UNC path (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Naming_Convention). Because these didn't exist under pure DOS, they don't have to be backward compatible (and \\remotehost\drive:\con doesn't make sense anyway, because without having a process on the remote host, there is no current 'console'). It would be a security hazard as well, having the serial and parallel ports accessible for everyone who is allowed to read or write in any single directory.
    Tuesday, May 29, 2007 5:21 AM
  • @ raghuram....yaa i will consider ur request next time i post anything...
    Tuesday, May 29, 2007 6:37 AM
  • Well seems similar to my post...almost same..

     

    anyways ... good info about UNC, but it is highly risky and u cannot delet it once created.....

    Tuesday, May 29, 2007 7:54 AM
  • You can delete the file or folder as "rmdir \\.\e:\con"
    Tuesday, May 29, 2007 8:58 AM
  • Automated System Recovery (ASR)

    Complete the steps outlined below to utilize XP's Automated System Recovery (ASR) functionality.

    Scope:

    Dual Partitions (C and D)
    XP installed on C

    Backup

    1. Go to the Start button/All Programs/Accessories/System Tools/Backup
    2. Select the Advanced Mode link within the Backup wizard.
    3. Click the Automated System Restore Wizard button.
    4. Point the backup media file name to the D drive rename the backup file asr (d:\asr.bkf). (*Do not point the backup to the C drive where XP is installed because during the Restore mode the C drive will be formatted) Click Next and then click Finish. ASR will start it's System State backup (which copies all system files and registry configuration)
    5. After the backup of the system state is completed (approx 5-10 minutes), You will be prompted to insert a floppy disk into the A drive. Click OK. XP will complete the ASR backup.

    * ASR will only backup the system state (windows folder) and registry configuration. You must return to Backup and create a separate backup of your valued data to the D drive.

    Restore

    In the event that your system becomes inaccessible and/or System Restore does not function properly, complete these steps.

    1. Make sure the system can boot from a CD-Rom (via the bios setup)
    2. Insert the Windows XP CD-Rom into the drive
    3. Insert the ASR Floppy disk into the drive
    4. Power up the computer
    5. Press the enter key when prompted to "press any key to run from the CD-rom"
    6. Press F2 on the keyboard when prompted to start the ASR recovery action.
    7. XP will format the C drive
    8. The computer will restart
    9. Let windows XP start automatically (do not press a key to run from the CD rom).
    10. XP will go through the basic plug and play discovery and copy setup files to the C drive.
    11. The computer will restart and boot into XP
    12. The ASR wizard will start and automatically point to the asr.bkf file on the D drive. Click OK to restore the system state and registry configuration.
    13. When completed XP will either present the login screen or login to the desktop automatically (depending on the configuration at the time the ASR backup was initiated).
    14. Return to the Backup wizard to restore any valued data that was saved beforehand to the D drive.

    Benefits of using ASR

    Timesaver = Entire restore process takes less than 30 minutes.
    Configuration in tact = Desktop and user preference settings will be maintained.
    Redundancy = Provides an additional restore option besides System Restore.
    Registry = Backs up and restores the entire current registry configuration settings.

    Drawbacks of using ASR

    Does not restore any installed programs from the program Files folder.
    Does not work on a single partition.

    Completing an ASR backup on a regular basis will provide additional control over the outcome of a system failure.

    Wednesday, May 30, 2007 10:24 AM
  • If you want to quickly view a supported format audio/video file, and don't want to wait until Media Player loads, you can create a new action for these file types in Explorer under Tools/Folder Options/File Types/Advanced/New, called e.g. "Preview", with "C:\Windows\System32\Mplay32.exe" /Play "%L" as application specification.
    Wednesday, May 30, 2007 10:28 AM
  • click start
    open run and type services.msc

    then double click on help and support
    change the startup type to manual

    if you are not using automatic updates then
    double click on automatic updates and then
    set the startup to manual




    By doing this you save some precious Ram of your computer

    Wednesday, May 30, 2007 12:39 PM
  • Thanks guys i have successfully renamed my RecycleBin to "Kachra Peti" Stick out tongue
    Sunday, June 10, 2007 2:32 PM