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RAID 0 performance levels with VAIL RRS feed

  • Question

  • Does anyone know the best way to acheive this?

     

    I installed Vail and Vail refresh and I only get data transfer rates of circa 40mbps. As an experiment I installed Windows 7 on the same hardware with Raid 0 and I get a consistent 120mbps, further I get transfer rates over my gigabit network at around 110mbps .  This is important as all my pc's redirect their 'My' documents folders to the central server.

     

    I'd like to revert to having the same functionality on my server but with the disk transfer performance of RAID 0. Does anyone have any suggestions? System partition on a separate drive with RAID 10 or 5 for the storage?

     

    I'm not too bothered about the WHS own backup functions as RAID 5 or 10 should handle this in the event of a disk failure.

    Tuesday, October 12, 2010 12:58 PM

All replies

  • A number of people have mentioned that they've had disk performance issues with Vail. I see very similar performance with V1 and Vail on the same hardware, but I've never seen transfer rates (including all factors) greater than about 30-40 MB/s on that box.

    I don't think anyone has bothered to submit a bug report on this, which will be essential for Microsoft to determine if the issue is internal (i.e. Vail is the source of the bottleneck) or external (incorrect drivers, hardware/OS incompatibility, etc.), and whether it needs to be addressed. Perhaps you could do so?

    As for RAID, go ahead and use it, but it's still not a supported storage technology. If you choose to go this route, I would install Vail on a small drive (160 GB is the minimum), then exclude that drive from server storage and expand the system partition to fill the remainder of the drive. Then use a large RAID array as your server storage.

    One thing: please don't use RAID 0 for any drive that's going to contain data you actually care about. RAID 0 is less reliable than the least reliable disk in the array.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Tuesday, October 12, 2010 2:42 PM
    Moderator
  • A number of people have mentioned that they've had disk performance issues with Vail. I see very similar performance with V1 and Vail on the same hardware, but I've never seen transfer rates (including all factors) greater than about 30-40 MB/s on that box.

    I think the performance increase is due to the dual drive array.

    I don't think anyone has bothered to submit a bug report on this, which will be essential for Microsoft to determine if the issue is internal (i.e. Vail is the source of the bottleneck) or external (incorrect drivers, hardware/OS incompatibility, etc.), and whether it needs to be addressed. Perhaps you could do so?

    I now have W7 installed so will need to install VAIL again. Once I have purchased a small high performance drive for the OS I will test and submit.

    As for RAID, go ahead and use it, but it's still not a supported storage technology. If you choose to go this route, I would install Vail on a small drive (160 GB is the minimum), then exclude that drive from server storage and expand the system partition to fill the remainder of the drive. Then use a large RAID array as your server storage.

    I think the performance increase is due to the dual drive array. DO you think I still get this with a single system drive and RAID drives for storage? I suppose this is down to where the bottleneck lies.

    One thing: please don't use RAID 0 for any drive that's going to contain data you actually care about. RAID 0 is less reliable than the least reliable disk in the array.

    I'll be using RAID 5 or 10 so that a drive failure should be covered by RAID parity.
    Tuesday, October 12, 2010 3:30 PM
  • As for RAID, go ahead and use it, but it's still not a supported storage technology. If you choose to go this route, I would install Vail on a small drive (160 GB is the minimum), then exclude that drive from server storage and expand the system partition to fill the remainder of the drive. Then use a large RAID array as your server storage.

    Just ordered a WD1600BUDT which will be here on Thursday. Could you help me with the best procedure for installing with a small HD for the OS? 

     

    I have the following:

     

    1 x 160GB SATA 300

    4 x 1TB SATA 300.

     

    Thanks

     

    Joe

     

    Tuesday, October 12, 2010 3:59 PM
  • 
    "joewalch" wrote in message
    news:e4cc940b-bb09-447d-b2c5-469c2a3b9ec3@communitybridge.codeplex.com...
    > As for RAID, go ahead and use it, but it's still not a supported storage
    > technology. If you choose to go this route, I would install Vail on a
    > small drive (160 GB is the minimum), then exclude that drive from server
    > storage and expand the system partition to fill the remainder of the
    > drive. Then use a large RAID array as your server storage.
    >
    > Just ordered a WD1600BUDT which will be here on Thursday. Could you help
    > me with the best procedure for installing with a small HD for the OS?
    >
    > I have the following:
    >
    > 1 x 160GB SATA 300
    >
    > 4 x 1TB SATA 300.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Joe
    >
    ---
    Yes, please. I have a 250 GB drive holding Vail. Especially the part about
    "expanding the system partition to fill the remainder of the drive" because
    I'm not too sure about that.
     
    For now, I'm limited to three drives (2 SATA and 1 IDE [can remove DVD drive
    for one more IDE, but don't want to] with this older motherboard. That is,
    unless there's a card that can be inserted for more SATA drives. One of the
    storage drives is 1 TB and the other one is 320 GB.
     
    Once Vail RTMs, I will opt for a better motherboard for my desktop PC and
    use that one for Vail. Then I can have more drives to do what I need to do.
    --
    Nancy Ward
    Windows 8 Beta Ferret
     
     

    Nancy Ward
    Tuesday, October 12, 2010 4:41 PM
  • Excluding the system disk from the storage pool may have a (small) beneficial effect on overall performance; the system disk is busy all the time with OS functions. Strictly speaking, though, extending the system partition isn't supported as it requires desktop access. So here's what you will need to do:

    • In the server dashboard, make sure that there is at least one drive other than the system drive listed under "Default storage pool".
    • Right click the system drive, and select "Exclude the system drive from the storage pool". This will take some time if you have a lot of data on the system drive.
    • Log on to your server using Remote Desktop, or the local console.
    • Click the Start button, then in the search box type diskmgmt.msc and press Enter.
    • On your system drive, you should see a 100 MB partition, a 60 GB partition (assuming you didn't change the default), and the remainder should show as free space. Right click the 60 GB partition, select Extend Volume… and work your way through the Extend Volume wizard.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Wednesday, October 13, 2010 2:01 AM
    Moderator
  • 
    "Ken Warren [MVP]" wrote in message
    news:824b4f8f-da72-4571-9684-0fed27de1286@communitybridge.codeplex.com...
    > Excluding the system disk from the storage pool may have a (small)
    > beneficial effect on overall performance; the system disk is busy all the
    > time with OS functions. Strictly speaking, though, extending the system
    > partition isn't supported as it requires desktop access. So here's what
    > you will need to do:
    >
    >
    >  a.. In the server dashboard, make sure that there is at least one drive
    > other than the system drive listed under "Default storage pool".
    >  b.. Right click the system drive, and select "Exclude the system drive
    > from the storage pool". This will take some time if you have a lot of data
    > on the system drive.
    >  c.. Log on to your server using Remote Desktop, or the local console.
    >  d.. Click the Start button, then in the search box type diskmgmt.msc and
    > press Enter.
    >  e.. On your system drive, you should see a 100 MB partition, a 60 GB
    > partition (assuming you didn't change the default), and the remainder
    > should show as free space. Right click the 60 GB partition, select Extend
    > Volume… and work your way through the Extend Volume wizard.
    >
    >
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    ---
    Thank you, Ken. I'll try to do that tomorrow.
    --
    Nancy Ward
    Windows 8 Beta Ferret
     
     

    Nancy Ward
    Wednesday, October 13, 2010 3:30 AM