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Activation issues... HELP! RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hey!
    I have just recently finished building myself a computer.
    I borrowed the Windows XP Pro install CD from a friend of mine, and used the product code (possibly the one they purchased) to activate my windows. When i got into windows, i found a way to change the product code that this computer uses because the one i purchased would not work during instilation. I pass windows Genuine Advantage, but i can not pass the activation window located in windows itself. When it prompts me to input my activation code, i do it, and press enter. Semingly, the page 'reloads' and i see the exact same page with my activation code inputed. At the top of the page is text saying that Incorrect Activation Code. I know this is false because the activation code i purchaced was only used once, and it is avalable for 2 uses.

    Please help me with activation, and thanks in advance.
    Robert
    Friday, October 3, 2008 2:32 AM

Answers

  • Robert DaSilva,

    Thank you for visiting the Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA) program forum. The first bit of information surrounds Software Licensing. You need to use the media which came with your Product Key to do the install because the data from the CD/DVD will need to match the Product Key. And sharing media may lead to Validation problems. The second piece is about how to order recovery media. If you have an OEM Product Key and Machine, then you would need to contact the OEM manufacturer for replacement media. If it is a Full product Retail version of the Operating System, then you would need to contact Microsoft for a replacement CD/DVD. See below...

    Software Licensing

    The purpose of this forum is the support of the WGA program.  Your question is off topic as well as outside my area of knowledge.
    I would like to provide some information which may help. There are two types of licenses for XP that consumers will encounter. Retail (aka the full version product), and OEM (original equipment manufacturer product).

    Retail licenses may be moved from one computer to another, as long as the license is activated on one computer at a time and as long as the previous installation of the license is removed from the previously licensed computer.

    OEM licenses for XP are tied to the first computer onto which they are installed and the license is not permitted to be moved on any other computer.  For the purposes of defining what a computer is, since a computer is really just a collection of parts, Microsoft has established that the motherboard is the base or "defining" component, and the OEM license is permanently tied to the motherboard.

    There is one exception. If a motherboard becomes defective, you are permitted to change it and reinstall your OEM XP license to it.  You should replace it with an identical board or the manufacturer's designated replacement. OEM licenses obtained thru a major manufacturer that uses SLP technology set the recovery or repair CD to look for certain bits in the BIOS of the official manufacturer's motherboards.  If such bits are not found, as they would not be if you replaced the defective board with one not from the original computer manufacturer, then the CD will refuse to install XP. The correct thing to do in these cases is to install XP using a genuine system builder/OEM Microsoft Windows XP CD-ROM, which does not have the SLP technology.  When installing, be sure to use the Product Key on the Certificate of Authenticity affixed to the computer, and NOT the Product Key that came with the CD-ROM. (Note that retail and Volume License CDs will NOT accept OEM product keys, returning an "invalid product key" error.)  Finally, when installation is complete, do a Telephonic Activation because the OEM PK on the COA will not be accepted by the automated online activation system.  If the automated telephone system also refuses activation, choose the option to speak with an activation rep and explain that you are replacing a defective motherboard and cannot use the manufacturer-supplied recovery CD-ROM.

    One does not "lose their license" for XP if the motherboard becomes defective and has to be replaced.  If the computer owner chooses to use, or because of availability is forced to use, a board that is not a direct or identical replacement, there has to be a mechanism to accommodate these circumstances, and that is why a telephonic activation is authorized.

    Note that if the computer owner decides to replace the motherboard for performance reasons or to add features or new technology, the defective exception is NOT applicable and a new license for XP is required to be purchased. A clean installation destroys all data on the hard disk, so be sure to back up any valuable email, pictures, docs, music, etc that you cannot afford to lose.

    Additional Information:

    For licensing questions, please call 1-800-426-9400 (select option 4), Monday through Friday, 6:00 A.M. to 5:30 P.M. (PST) to speak directly to a Microsoft licensing specialist.

    Volume licensing customers can use the Microsoft Volume Licensing site to find contact information in their locations. See the following link:

    http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/default.mspx  


    Replacement Media

    Periodically Microsoft customers have misplaced discs of a purchased program and inquire about replacements.  The following Knowledge Base (KB) article is entitled “How to replace Microsoft software or hardware, order service packs and product upgrades, or replace product manuals.” It describes how to replace Microsoft software or hardware, order service packs, product upgrades, and product manuals. The Microsoft Supplemental Parts team is available to help customers in North America who need any of the following:

    Replacements for Microsoft software or hardware

    Service packs on CD

    Product upgrades

    Replacement product manuals

    Please review the KB article in its entirety ensuring you are eligible for replacing the product in question.

    It can be found here:

    KB326246 - How to replace Microsoft software or hardware, order service packs and product upgrades, and replace product manuals

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/326246,

    If your Windows XP CD was an OEM System Builder CD, request a replacement from your system builder.  If they cannot help, order a replacement from Microsoft.

    United States and Canada:

    https://om.one.microsoft.com/opa/start.om?StoreID=B19F4CE9-DFCB-44E4-9ABE-1C9DFBAD47D0&NewTrans=1localecode=en-us

    (https://om.one.microsoft.com/opa/start.om?StoreID=B19F4CE9-DFCB-44E4-9ABE-1C9DFBAD47D0&NewTrans=1&localecode=en-us)

    Europe, Middle East, Africa:

    https://om.one.microsoft.com/opa/start.om?StoreID=30B288C0-52A6-4AA4-A2BC-2B60DDA37DB1&NewTrans=1&localecode=en-us

    Asia-Pacific: 

    https://om.one.microsoft.com/opa/start.om?StoreID=3D264FB4-A497-4C00-8180-2BB3C548B55B&NewTrans=1&localecode=en-us

    Latin America or South America:

    https://om.one.microsoft.com/opa/start.om?StoreID=733F8F42-707E-4045-9243-A5E655A6041B&NewTrans=1&localecode=en-us

    [v1] Also if you have lost, broken, or misplaced your original Microsoft Office or Microsoft Publisher installation CD, you can order replacement media from Microsoft.

    KB302822 - How to order a replacement CD for Microsoft Office

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/302822/en-us

    Thank you for visiting the WGA program forum.

    Rick, MS

    • Marked as answer by RickImAPC Friday, October 3, 2008 2:16 PM
    Friday, October 3, 2008 3:50 AM

All replies

  • Robert DaSilva,

    Thank you for visiting the Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA) program forum. The first bit of information surrounds Software Licensing. You need to use the media which came with your Product Key to do the install because the data from the CD/DVD will need to match the Product Key. And sharing media may lead to Validation problems. The second piece is about how to order recovery media. If you have an OEM Product Key and Machine, then you would need to contact the OEM manufacturer for replacement media. If it is a Full product Retail version of the Operating System, then you would need to contact Microsoft for a replacement CD/DVD. See below...

    Software Licensing

    The purpose of this forum is the support of the WGA program.  Your question is off topic as well as outside my area of knowledge.
    I would like to provide some information which may help. There are two types of licenses for XP that consumers will encounter. Retail (aka the full version product), and OEM (original equipment manufacturer product).

    Retail licenses may be moved from one computer to another, as long as the license is activated on one computer at a time and as long as the previous installation of the license is removed from the previously licensed computer.

    OEM licenses for XP are tied to the first computer onto which they are installed and the license is not permitted to be moved on any other computer.  For the purposes of defining what a computer is, since a computer is really just a collection of parts, Microsoft has established that the motherboard is the base or "defining" component, and the OEM license is permanently tied to the motherboard.

    There is one exception. If a motherboard becomes defective, you are permitted to change it and reinstall your OEM XP license to it.  You should replace it with an identical board or the manufacturer's designated replacement. OEM licenses obtained thru a major manufacturer that uses SLP technology set the recovery or repair CD to look for certain bits in the BIOS of the official manufacturer's motherboards.  If such bits are not found, as they would not be if you replaced the defective board with one not from the original computer manufacturer, then the CD will refuse to install XP. The correct thing to do in these cases is to install XP using a genuine system builder/OEM Microsoft Windows XP CD-ROM, which does not have the SLP technology.  When installing, be sure to use the Product Key on the Certificate of Authenticity affixed to the computer, and NOT the Product Key that came with the CD-ROM. (Note that retail and Volume License CDs will NOT accept OEM product keys, returning an "invalid product key" error.)  Finally, when installation is complete, do a Telephonic Activation because the OEM PK on the COA will not be accepted by the automated online activation system.  If the automated telephone system also refuses activation, choose the option to speak with an activation rep and explain that you are replacing a defective motherboard and cannot use the manufacturer-supplied recovery CD-ROM.

    One does not "lose their license" for XP if the motherboard becomes defective and has to be replaced.  If the computer owner chooses to use, or because of availability is forced to use, a board that is not a direct or identical replacement, there has to be a mechanism to accommodate these circumstances, and that is why a telephonic activation is authorized.

    Note that if the computer owner decides to replace the motherboard for performance reasons or to add features or new technology, the defective exception is NOT applicable and a new license for XP is required to be purchased. A clean installation destroys all data on the hard disk, so be sure to back up any valuable email, pictures, docs, music, etc that you cannot afford to lose.

    Additional Information:

    For licensing questions, please call 1-800-426-9400 (select option 4), Monday through Friday, 6:00 A.M. to 5:30 P.M. (PST) to speak directly to a Microsoft licensing specialist.

    Volume licensing customers can use the Microsoft Volume Licensing site to find contact information in their locations. See the following link:

    http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/default.mspx  


    Replacement Media

    Periodically Microsoft customers have misplaced discs of a purchased program and inquire about replacements.  The following Knowledge Base (KB) article is entitled “How to replace Microsoft software or hardware, order service packs and product upgrades, or replace product manuals.” It describes how to replace Microsoft software or hardware, order service packs, product upgrades, and product manuals. The Microsoft Supplemental Parts team is available to help customers in North America who need any of the following:

    Replacements for Microsoft software or hardware

    Service packs on CD

    Product upgrades

    Replacement product manuals

    Please review the KB article in its entirety ensuring you are eligible for replacing the product in question.

    It can be found here:

    KB326246 - How to replace Microsoft software or hardware, order service packs and product upgrades, and replace product manuals

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/326246,

    If your Windows XP CD was an OEM System Builder CD, request a replacement from your system builder.  If they cannot help, order a replacement from Microsoft.

    United States and Canada:

    https://om.one.microsoft.com/opa/start.om?StoreID=B19F4CE9-DFCB-44E4-9ABE-1C9DFBAD47D0&NewTrans=1localecode=en-us

    (https://om.one.microsoft.com/opa/start.om?StoreID=B19F4CE9-DFCB-44E4-9ABE-1C9DFBAD47D0&NewTrans=1&localecode=en-us)

    Europe, Middle East, Africa:

    https://om.one.microsoft.com/opa/start.om?StoreID=30B288C0-52A6-4AA4-A2BC-2B60DDA37DB1&NewTrans=1&localecode=en-us

    Asia-Pacific: 

    https://om.one.microsoft.com/opa/start.om?StoreID=3D264FB4-A497-4C00-8180-2BB3C548B55B&NewTrans=1&localecode=en-us

    Latin America or South America:

    https://om.one.microsoft.com/opa/start.om?StoreID=733F8F42-707E-4045-9243-A5E655A6041B&NewTrans=1&localecode=en-us

    [v1] Also if you have lost, broken, or misplaced your original Microsoft Office or Microsoft Publisher installation CD, you can order replacement media from Microsoft.

    KB302822 - How to order a replacement CD for Microsoft Office

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/302822/en-us

    Thank you for visiting the WGA program forum.

    Rick, MS

    • Marked as answer by RickImAPC Friday, October 3, 2008 2:16 PM
    Friday, October 3, 2008 3:50 AM
  • Fine. I am not going to buy a new product code, but use this version until it is unable to operate. Then i will get Vista from a friend, and use the 30 day trial software on the disks until that runs out, and go from there. It is disappointing that Microsoft would create OEM software licenses so that they are tied to a computer. The first computer that the license was tied to, was not meeting my needs, and the motherboard as well as everything else attached got fried. Considering that i payed for the licence that is now completly useless, i am extremly dissapointed in Microsoft, and am considering moving to a diffrent OS company.

    Thanks for the light that was shed on the topic,
    Robert DaSilva
    Friday, October 3, 2008 7:29 PM
  • Robert DaSliva,

    If you owned a computer in the past, and it was an OEM Machine from Gateway or Dell, and your computer's motherboard became defective, you can contact the OEM for replacement media, and install on an identical replaced motherboard and hdd (internals) your copy of the purchased OEM copy of XP.

    From Above: 

    One does not "lose their license" for XP if the motherboard becomes defective and has to be replaced.  If the computer owner chooses to use, or because of availability is forced to use, a board that is not a direct or identical replacement, there has to be a mechanism to accommodate these circumstances, and that is why a telephonic activation is authorized.

    If you have lost your media and your OEM no longer can support you, see the following link:

    KB326246 - How to replace Microsoft software or hardware, order service packs and product upgrades, and replace product manuals
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/326246/en-us

    Of course you would probably need to have the Product Key and paperwork associated with the computer you first purchased. If it was an OEM machine, it was on the Certificate of Authenticity COA sticker on the box. If it was Retail (Full product version) the COA is on the box.

    If for some reason a person were to upgrade their machine to increase performance, and change their motherboard, a replacement Operating System would not be authorized.

    I hope this information was helpful for you.

    Rick, MS

    Saturday, October 4, 2008 2:33 AM