locked
Having trouble restoring a computer after hard drive upgrade. RRS feed

  • Question

  •  I am currently using the trial version of WHS and am planning on purchasing the software once the trial is over. I have a P4 2.6Ghz machine that I purchased in 2003. It had in it a 120GB hard drive and I had added a second 120GB drive. They are both still working but I wanted to replace them with a bigger drive. I bought a 500GB drive and put it in the machine and am trying to restore my last backup to this new drive. First issue I have run into is it only allows me to use the backup from the C: drive onto the new drive. I have mainly used the second drive as extra storage so I don't necessarily need to add this onto the new drive right now. I can do that later once I have the machine back up and running. I've tried now twice to restore the C: drive onto the new larger drive and when I get to finish after everything is loaded I can't get the machine to boot up. The first time the new drive was named H: instead of C: so I thought that may have been the issue but when I restored a second time with the drive labeled C: I still am unable to get the system to boot up. Any ideas?

    Josh
    Thursday, January 8, 2009 6:37 PM

Answers

  • Hi Josh,
    to restore the content of volumes to a disk you will need to create the volumes first using disk management.
    If you have already created a volume, which is occupying the full size of the disk this may be the reason, why you could only restore one disk.
    So delete the volume on the new disk again and create two primary volumes on the disk, which have at least the size of the old volumes each.

    Did you restore from within the running system using ClientRestoreWizard.exe from the folder C:\Program Files\Windows Home Server or did you use the recovery environment? The first method would nullify driver related issues, since your running OS already has functioning drivers.

    After restoring remove the old drives from the computer and connect the IDE drive jumpered as master to the first IDE controller.
    Check also, if your Bios is the most current available for your board, since some older machines may have difficulties to handle disks larger than 128 GByte properly.

    Did the original disk have a hidden partition from the hardware maker?
    This FAQ may also be interesting for you.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Friday, January 9, 2009 10:15 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • I have done this on various machines in my network several times without any problems. It has worked for me from a ide based image to a new sata and even onto a new motherboard with the same chipset.

    There are a few things I would do, I use lots of trial and error when troubleshooting pc hardware issues:

    I would attempt to install the same operating system on that new drive, same OS as what you plan to restore, just to make sure it has a good boot partition.  One other possibility is that the boot restore process isnt utilizing storage drivers on the target machine properly. You could try the manual drivers process during restore with a usb flash drive. Are you using an AHCI based storage driver or is the motherboard using a compatibility mode? I would try the "make sata look like an IDE option" in your bios. Is it an SATAI or II based controller and drive? My last resort advice would be to run the backup on a different machine with the new 500g drive connected, just make sure you select the right image from the list to restore from.

    My backup and restore experiences with WHS have been excellent. As a long time ghost user, this feature alone makes WHS well worth it for me.
    Friday, January 9, 2009 12:05 AM
  • Sorry I forgot to mention that the new drive is an IDE drive. I am in the process right now of reinstalling the operating system from the recovery install disc but it's freezing up on the naming the system page. I figured I would try to install the OS and then try a restore.
    Friday, January 9, 2009 1:47 AM
  • Hi Josh,
    to restore the content of volumes to a disk you will need to create the volumes first using disk management.
    If you have already created a volume, which is occupying the full size of the disk this may be the reason, why you could only restore one disk.
    So delete the volume on the new disk again and create two primary volumes on the disk, which have at least the size of the old volumes each.

    Did you restore from within the running system using ClientRestoreWizard.exe from the folder C:\Program Files\Windows Home Server or did you use the recovery environment? The first method would nullify driver related issues, since your running OS already has functioning drivers.

    After restoring remove the old drives from the computer and connect the IDE drive jumpered as master to the first IDE controller.
    Check also, if your Bios is the most current available for your board, since some older machines may have difficulties to handle disks larger than 128 GByte properly.

    Did the original disk have a hidden partition from the hardware maker?
    This FAQ may also be interesting for you.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Friday, January 9, 2009 10:15 AM
    Moderator