locked
Controlling WDP on a Domain RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello,

    I am an IST student completing an internship as the computer technician in a public library, and I manage a computer lab with 16 workgrouped computers.  Windows Disk Protection is an excellent tool in this environment, since any changes patrons make to the computers simply vanish on restart. 

    The library administration is considering moving to a Domain to unify the libraries and centralize the delivery of updates and software installations.  As it stands, when it comes time to install software to the 16 computers, I make an image of one machine with the updates installed, then have to Ghost the image out and manually set IP addresses and such.  So having Domain control where I can push installation packages would be a wonderful thing, but we can't lose WDP.

    I've done a fair amount of Googling to find out how to control WDP from a central location, but haven't been able to find a good step by step of how to do so. 

    I imagine this would be implemented from the WMI section of the Group Policy Manager, but I haven't the faintest idea where to begin.  Could anyone provide or point to a good guide on this process?  I'm also in the process of learning how to manage a domain, so while I have some experience in managing GP and such, I'm certainly no expert; please be gentle :-D

    Many thanks,

    -Ron
    Tuesday, July 21, 2009 7:26 PM

Answers

All replies

  • Hi Ron, thanks for the post. I suggest you first take a look at the following threads:

     

    Steady State and MS Shared Computer Toolkit remote management

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/windowssteadystate/thread/a742572e-81d4-4fd3-8f38-cc315fd82f93/

     

    Does anyone have any sample WMI code for Windows Disk Protection?

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/windowssteadystate/thread/bd28152a-676b-44c3-9890-557cd950bc89/  

     

    Enable Disk Protection Via Command-Line?

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/windowssteadystate/thread/884d5c30-f50f-41ac-a8f0-7fdc6a3b64fb/

     

    Also, the KB article can be helpful:

     

    Description of the API for the Windows Disk Protection feature in Windows SteadyState

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/938335


    Sean Zhu - MSFT
    Thursday, July 23, 2009 9:49 AM
  • Hey Sean,

    Thanks for the information, and I apologize for getting back to you relatively late.

    I'm going to review the links you posted; I imagine I'll return with educated questions after I have done so.

    Thanks again!

    -Ron
    Tuesday, July 28, 2009 4:22 PM
  • Hello again,

    I was able to successfully run the scripts provided in the first link on a local machine.  I then experimented with running them remotely, and had some trouble doing so with a regular CMD cscript call.  However, I was able to do so with PSExec, so I've reached my next speedbump.

    I created a simple batch file that will run the Commit script, then do a PSShutdown restart immediately, thereby saving whatever changes I just performed.  However, how do I switch back to Discard and commit that change? 

    By that I mean, on a machine-by-machine basis, I can logon as an Admin, perform changes, and am prompted upon restarting if I want to discard changes or save changes once.  Doing it remotely, however, will commit the fact that it should always retain changes, as opposed to doing a commit-once.  I suppose I could create a logon script that runs the Discard.vbs script, but that seems slightly redudant, and it will permanently leave the machine in the Commit state until logon.  Likewise, I could figure out how to run a startup script, but this would still be a "cover up", or temporary solution, to the problem.   

    What can I do about this?  Please let me know if my post wasn't clear and I will do my best to clarify my question.

    Thanks,

    -Ron
    Thursday, July 30, 2009 5:54 PM