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Transfer Windows XP license to another computer RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have just purchased a new computer with XP Home Edition. I have had to purchase a new machine because the old one is on it's last legs. I have previously bought a retail version of Windows XP Pro for my old machine and I need to know if I can now put this on my new machine. I have been led to believe that as long as I re format the old machine then I should be able to put it on the new one.

    I have read conflicting views about this subject and I really need to know what the deal is.

    Any help would be appreciated.

    Thank you

    Lynsey
    Wednesday, October 18, 2006 12:04 PM

Answers

  • Yes, you may transfer your retail version of Windows XP Professional to your new computer as long as you remove it from the old compuer via reformatting the hard drive.
    Wednesday, October 18, 2006 12:51 PM
    Moderator
  •  

    zzz8h7,

     

    You are correct in that the answer is the same if the OS in question were XP Home, Pro, Media Center, Tablet, etc.  The license that comes on or with the computer is almost always an OEM license, and such licenses are married to the computer onto which they are first installed and cannot be moved to any other computer.

     

    In cases of preinstallations based on SLP technology where the Recovery CD is programmed to look for certain informaion in the motherboard BIOS, as long as the motherboard is sourced from the original manufacturer and is designated by such manufacturer as the correct replacement part for that model of laptop, the Recovery CDs are supposed to work and are expected to completely install the original OEM license onto the computer after such a motherboard replacement.

     

    From an OEM licensing point of view, the processor chip itself can be upgraded without running afoul of the OEM license's restriction on movement, because Microsoft considers the motherboard to be the defining component rather than the processor.  Of course, a big upgrade in processor chip will necessitate a more capable motherboard so indirectly there are limits on how extensive of a processor upgrade can be without crossing the "new computer" line in the sand.

    • Marked as answer by Carl-S Wednesday, July 23, 2008 11:52 PM
    Sunday, December 23, 2007 4:46 AM

All replies

  • Yes, you may transfer your retail version of Windows XP Professional to your new computer as long as you remove it from the old compuer via reformatting the hard drive.
    Wednesday, October 18, 2006 12:51 PM
    Moderator
  • Thank you very much :)
    Wednesday, October 18, 2006 12:53 PM
  • I would like to transfer the OS from my old pc to my new pc (used, but new to me) because of hard drive failure, the proverbial black screen of death, let`s bow our heads in a moment of silence. Seriously though, reformating the old hard drive is not an option, I have the original CD and COA sticker, will I be able to transfer my XP Home to my new computer? I thank you for your time and I appreciate any help, Leigh

    Saturday, December 1, 2007 5:50 PM
  • How to Perform a Windows XP Repair Install:

    http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/XPrepairinstall.htm

    Saturday, December 1, 2007 9:42 PM
    Moderator
  • Thank you for this information, but I have decided that with my limited PC skills I should just purchase a new XP OS.

    deadzoo

    Saturday, December 15, 2007 9:59 PM
  • I have a laptop computer (Sony Vaio) that came with Windows XP Pro pre-installed. Unfortunately, the motherboard of the laptop died, and the machine will not boot. I plan to discard the machine. I have already reformatted the disk and used it in another computer. Can I transfer the Windows XP license to another computer I own? If so, how can I get the Windows XP software (either via download or on media)? The laptop computer came with a "restore" disk (i.e., an image of the laptop's disk with XP and other software already installed, not a retail XP installation disk). I believe the disk can be used only to restore an entire system disk on the original laptop, not on another computer.

     

    Many thanks,

    George J.

    Saturday, December 22, 2007 9:57 PM
  • zzz8h7,

     

    If the Certificate of Authenticity on the bottom of the laptop says XP Pro, and this is the license you are asking about, then the answer is NO.

     

    The above license for XP Pro would be an OEM license, and OEM licenses are NOT permitted to be moved to any other computer.  The license is married to the Sony and the license would die when its computer dies.

     

    Saturday, December 22, 2007 10:05 PM
  • I was wrong. The CoA on the bottom of the laptop says Windows XP Home Edition. I assume the answer is the same. So, I have another question. If I replace the motherboard, will I be able to restore and validate? A replacement motherboard will be vendor and model (Sony Vaio) specific, so presumably the BIOS and everything else should be the same as the original motherboard. Would the situation be different if I replaced the CPU?

     

    George J.

    Saturday, December 22, 2007 10:23 PM
  •  

    zzz8h7,

     

    You are correct in that the answer is the same if the OS in question were XP Home, Pro, Media Center, Tablet, etc.  The license that comes on or with the computer is almost always an OEM license, and such licenses are married to the computer onto which they are first installed and cannot be moved to any other computer.

     

    In cases of preinstallations based on SLP technology where the Recovery CD is programmed to look for certain informaion in the motherboard BIOS, as long as the motherboard is sourced from the original manufacturer and is designated by such manufacturer as the correct replacement part for that model of laptop, the Recovery CDs are supposed to work and are expected to completely install the original OEM license onto the computer after such a motherboard replacement.

     

    From an OEM licensing point of view, the processor chip itself can be upgraded without running afoul of the OEM license's restriction on movement, because Microsoft considers the motherboard to be the defining component rather than the processor.  Of course, a big upgrade in processor chip will necessitate a more capable motherboard so indirectly there are limits on how extensive of a processor upgrade can be without crossing the "new computer" line in the sand.

    • Marked as answer by Carl-S Wednesday, July 23, 2008 11:52 PM
    Sunday, December 23, 2007 4:46 AM
  • I have a copy of Windows XP Professional that a friend got me. I can transfer it.
    Friday, March 13, 2009 10:52 PM
  • I do not want to reformat the hard drive on the Laptop (old version with XP) . Can I simply De-Activate Windows XP, then UnInstall it?  Then Install the retail version XP Pro to my desktop.  The reason I can't re-format the HD on the laptop is this:

    One 250Gig HD, partitioned with Vista on C: and XP on D:  If you can tell me How To Re-Format D: only, I can do that.  But I can't afford the risk (with my limited knowledge) in losing Data & Programs on C: (with Vista) to De-Activate Win XP on D:

    If This Is The ONLY WAY, then I'm Forced to re-format the HD in the laptop.

    Saturday, August 28, 2010 9:43 PM
  • This seems like a double ripoff for the consumer - I mean, you have a hardware failure after the warranty period expires, you have to buy another computer, then you are ripped off by the OS maker when the software is perfectly fine and IF you are only using it on ONE computer, it should be transferable. I have 5 computers that I have upgraded in my office, I no longer wish to use them but due to the point of sale hardware and software I use, I must use XP.  Now after paying for 5 copies of XP at the time I purchased the computers (OEM but it is still part of the cost)  Now I am being prevented from using software that I purchased.  How is this not ripping me off?
    Wednesday, March 2, 2011 7:15 AM
  • "Jaxx SC" wrote in message news:9c61e2c9-6db1-4386-9fb7-a374e8457156...
    This seems like a double ripoff for the consumer - I mean, you have a hardware failure after the warranty period expires, you have to buy another computer, then you are ripped off by the OS maker when the software is perfectly fine and IF you are only using it on ONE computer, it should be transferable. I have 5 computers that I have upgraded in my office, I no longer wish to use them but due to the point of sale hardware and software I use, I must use XP.  Now after paying for 5 copies of XP at the time I purchased the computers (OEM but it is still part of the cost)  Now I am being prevented from using software that I purchased.  How is this not ripping me off?

    The OEM License price to big manufacturers is a fraction of the retail price - which is why computers are so cheap. The OEM is expected to support the customer - they cannot be expected to support hardware that they know nothing about.
    You got what you paid for - a cheap OS.
    If you want MS support, and portability, then you have to purchase either Volume  or Retail licenses.

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Wednesday, March 2, 2011 7:51 AM
    Moderator
  • Please do not resurrect a 5 year old thread.

    If you have a Validation or activation issue or question, please create your own thread.

     

     

    <Thread Locked>


    Darin MS
    Thursday, January 5, 2012 9:50 PM