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Will this work? One drive for Vail and the other for my data. RRS feed

  • Question

  • I currently have a WinXP Home machine that I'm using as a Home Server.  I'd like to test Vail.  But because it's a beta, I was thinking of putting Vail on one hard drive, and my music, pictures, videos, backups, and documents on a second hard drive.  That way if I have to reinstall Vail or WinXP I would still have my media and data...  right?

    I mean, I know WHS1 "combined" my hard drives and let me see them as one large drive.  I'm assuming Vail does the same.  Would this interfere with my plans?  If Vail borks itself on one hard drive will my data be safe on the second hard drive?

    Friday, August 6, 2010 9:25 PM

Answers

  • Vail uses the same sort of experience for storage as Home Server V1, however Drive Extender in V2 moves from sitting on the file share, to a kernel mode driver.  So this example you mentioed would work, where if your Vail OS drive (you would need to ensure you configure this as an OS drive full, and not a dual OS/Storage Pool drive) was separate from your storage pool drive(s), then yes your data would be safe if you lost the OS drive.  If you re-installed Vail, you could re-attach your storage pool drive(s).  NOTE - as DE is now a kernel mode driver, only Vail can use the storage pool drives.  XP or any other OS will not be able to see or manage the data on the storage pool drives.

    You also have Server Backup now in Vail, so you could also restore files from server backup as needed.

     

    thanks

    Michael

    • Proposed as answer by Ken WarrenModerator Friday, August 6, 2010 11:53 PM
    • Marked as answer by Gammit10 Saturday, August 7, 2010 3:48 AM
    Friday, August 6, 2010 11:42 PM

All replies

  • Vail uses the same sort of experience for storage as Home Server V1, however Drive Extender in V2 moves from sitting on the file share, to a kernel mode driver.  So this example you mentioed would work, where if your Vail OS drive (you would need to ensure you configure this as an OS drive full, and not a dual OS/Storage Pool drive) was separate from your storage pool drive(s), then yes your data would be safe if you lost the OS drive.  If you re-installed Vail, you could re-attach your storage pool drive(s).  NOTE - as DE is now a kernel mode driver, only Vail can use the storage pool drives.  XP or any other OS will not be able to see or manage the data on the storage pool drives.

    You also have Server Backup now in Vail, so you could also restore files from server backup as needed.

     

    thanks

    Michael

    • Proposed as answer by Ken WarrenModerator Friday, August 6, 2010 11:53 PM
    • Marked as answer by Gammit10 Saturday, August 7, 2010 3:48 AM
    Friday, August 6, 2010 11:42 PM
  • NOTE - as DE is now a kernel mode driver, only Vail can use the storage pool drives.  XP or any other OS will not be able to see or manage the data on the storage pool drives.

    but different machines will be able to see and use the data, right?  What do you mean that they won't be able to see or manage the data?
    Saturday, August 7, 2010 12:22 AM
  • Basically, what Vail will do is erase all the hard drives you have connected when you set it up, add those now devoid of all data drives to its storage pool, and format them with its own unique file system hierarchy.

    Anything you have on those drives before Vail is installed will be gone.  

    In order for Vail to know about any of your files, you have to copy them onto the Vail server after it's set up.

    What I would do, if I was you:  Get an external hard drive and put your data on it or take your XP & data drives out of your PC and put some empty internal drives in, then install Vail.  Then, when Vail is up and running and your XP drive and data are safe somewhere else, copy the data onto Vail.  You can do this either by plugging the data drive into another PC and copying it over the network or (and I've only done this in WHS v1, so caveat emptor) connect it to Vail, access it like any other drive on any other windows machine (i.e. the E: or F: drive) and copy the data onto the vail shared folder that you want it in.

    That being said, this is all a terrible idea.  You should, really, have a dedicated machine (or virtual machine) to run WHS 1 or Vail.  WHS (both versions) does things differently.  Vail, especially, should be treated like something dangerous that you need to protect your data from...   

    Saturday, August 7, 2010 3:21 AM
  • That being said, this is all a terrible idea.  You should, really, have a dedicated machine (or virtual machine) to run WHS 1 or Vail.  WHS (both versions) does things differently.  Vail, especially, should be treated like something dangerous that you need to protect your data from...   

    I do have a dedicated machine to run Vail.  I'm going to erase WinXP Home on my Home Server machine and install the Vail trial.  Vail will not be installed on my main desktop or my laptop.

    So if I understand you correctly, this would work and be wiser:

    1.) copy my server's media and data on to a separate hard drive or machine
    2.) install vail
    3.) copy the media and data back on to vail

    This way I would have an extra copy, on a machine that is free from vail, in case of disaster.

    Saturday, August 7, 2010 3:35 AM
  • Basically, what Vail will do is erase all the hard drives you have connected when you set it up
    Actually, no it won't.  It will only wipe the primary drive (all other drives are left alone during installation).

    add those now devoid of all data drives to its storage pool, and format them with its own unique file system hierarchy.

    Anything you have on those drives before Vail is installed will be gone.  

    In order for Vail to know about any of your files, you have to copy them onto the Vail server after it's set up.

    What I would do, if I was you:  Get an external hard drive and put your data on it or take your XP & data drives out of your PC and put some empty internal drives in, then install Vail.  Then, when Vail is up and running and your XP drive and data are safe somewhere else, copy the data onto Vail.  You can do this either by plugging the data drive into another PC and copying it over the network or (and I've only done this in WHS v1, so caveat emptor) connect it to Vail, access it like any other drive on any other windows machine (i.e. the E: or F: drive) and copy the data onto the vail shared folder that you want it in.

    That being said, this is all a terrible idea.  You should, really, have a dedicated machine (or virtual machine) to run WHS 1 or Vail.  WHS (both versions) does things differently.  Vail, especially, should be treated like something dangerous that you need to protect your data from...   


    Saturday, August 7, 2010 3:39 AM
    Moderator
  • I do have a dedicated machine to run Vail.  I'm going to erase WinXP Home on my Home Server machine and install the Vail trial.  Vail will not be installed on my main desktop or my laptop.

    So if I understand you correctly, this would work and be wiser:

    1.) copy my server's media and data on to a separate hard drive or machine
    2.) install vail
    3.) copy the media and data back on to vail

    This way I would have an extra copy, on a machine that is free from vail, in case of disaster.

    If I was using real hardware, that's what I would do.  (I'm actually running Vail in a VM, but the concept is the same.)
    Saturday, August 7, 2010 3:41 AM
    Moderator
  • I do have a dedicated machine to run Vail.  I'm going to erase WinXP Home on my Home Server machine and install the Vail trial.  Vail will not be installed on my main desktop or my laptop.

    So if I understand you correctly, this would work and be wiser:

    1.) copy my server's media and data on to a separate hard drive or machine
    2.) install vail
    3.) copy the media and data back on to vail

    This way I would have an extra copy, on a machine that is free from vail, in case of disaster.

    If I was using real hardware, that's what I would do.  (I'm actually running Vail in a VM, but the concept is the same.)
    Thank you all, this was very helpful.  Formatting my new hard drive now to copy my media on to. :)
    Saturday, August 7, 2010 3:49 AM
  • That's what I get for basing my replies on my most recent install of WHSv1.. :) thanks for clearing it up, Kariya.
    Saturday, August 7, 2010 5:06 AM
  • Yes, that's the safest way to do it.
    Saturday, August 7, 2010 5:06 AM
  • That's what I get for basing my replies on my most recent install of WHSv1.. :) thanks for clearing it up, Kariya.
    Don't feel bad.  I missed that on the Vail install screen as well.  I said the same thing as you a few days ago in a different post and Ken had to correct me.  :)
    Saturday, August 7, 2010 2:42 PM
    Moderator
  • Actually, no it won't.  It will only wipe the primary drive (all other drives are left alone during installation).

     

    I have a homebrew file server running Windows 7.  I have an HTPC connected to it.  For the most part it works alright streaming bluray content over the network but it does bog down at times.  I have been thinking about WHS but hate the power management controls of the existing version so I want to try vail but have some questions before I begin.

    I have 2 x 2TB drives in the machine (4TB total storage).  My primary drive has 2 partitions, one about 200 GB and one about 1.8TB.  My second drive is a single 2TB drive.  On the primary drive, the second partition is full.  My second drive is almost full as well so I can move data from drive 1 to drive 2.

    Will vail install on a partition or will it want to format the entire drive?

    Once vail is installed and I have all the drives setup, would I be able to install Win7 back on the primary drive partition and still see the other data or will vail change the filesystem to be unrecognizable by Win7?

    Im not really worried about losing all the data because I have the original source material but it's the sheer time to get all that media is the killer.  I'm trying to avoid buying external drives to backup my backup.

    Thursday, November 11, 2010 8:13 PM