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System Drive Wrong Model # RRS feed

  • Question

  • After replacing my system drive, in the console, on the Server Storage tab, in the hard drive Name column, the system drive's model # is the model number of the old hard drive that failed, not the new hard drive.  The old drive was a Seagate 300G and I replaced it with a WD 500G.  It still shows the model # of the previous Seagate 300G.  This appears to be mostly cosmetic and does not affect the operation of the server in any way.  I just thought I'd ask if anyone knows why this happened.
    Douglas McLaughlin
    Monday, September 14, 2009 6:28 PM

All replies

  • After replacing my system drive, in the console, on the Server Storage tab, in the hard drive Name column, the system drive's model # is the model number of the old hard drive that failed, not the new hard drive.  The old drive was a Seagate 300G and I replaced it with a WD 500G.  It still shows the model # of the previous Seagate 300G.  This appears to be mostly cosmetic and does not affect the operation of the server in any way.  I just thought I'd ask if anyone knows why this happened.
    Did you clone the drive using software such as e.g. Acronis True Image? Cloning a Windows Home Server drive (system, storage pool, or server backup) is unsupported. If your server is operating normally (outside of the incorrect model number) consider it a minor cosmetic flaw, a result of an unsupported procedure, and don't worry about it. :)
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Proposed as answer by Ken WarrenModerator Monday, September 14, 2009 7:20 PM
    • Unproposed as answer by stricq Tuesday, September 15, 2009 6:02 PM
    Monday, September 14, 2009 7:20 PM
    Moderator
  • Cloning the complete drive information together with the data is the only method, which seem to be proofed to work for a successful transfer of the system disk to another volume without a server reinstall (which you could still try now).
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Monday, September 14, 2009 9:15 PM
    Moderator
  • The drive was not cloned.  When the system drive failed, I replaced it with a brand new drive and performed a fresh recovery installation using the PP1 ISO that is available on MSDN.
    Douglas McLaughlin
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009 6:04 PM
  • I would not wonder, that the setup program pulls out exactly that information from the configuration files on the other disks and restore that part as well to ensure a smooth running. Migrating to different disks was never a plan in the concept of Windows Home Server, which originally only has been sold as hardware appliance, so that a failed system drive would have changed against the same model by the vendor during the warranty.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009 7:14 PM
    Moderator