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Restore Surface Pro From WHS 2011 Backup RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi!

    I have updated my WHS 2011 to backup UEFI systems. I have used WHS 2011 to create a USB boot drive to perform a restore. The USB boot drive works for my desktop and laptop computers. For my Surface Pro tablet, however, it gives the following error message:

            \efi\Microsoft\boot\bcd

            Status: 0xc000000d

            An error occurred while trying to ... data

    (The full error message text is not available because the message is partially off the Surface screen.)

    Has anybody tried to restore a Surface Pro? Any suggestions on how to modify the USB boot drive so that it will boot the Surface Pro and allow the restore to proceed?

    Thanks!


    Ric Schecter (tyrone3a)

    Saturday, August 8, 2015 2:17 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    If the USB boot driver only failed to restore system on Surface. You may try to disable fast startup and  Secure Boot Control, then confirm the result.

    Besides, for Surface, you'll need an external USB drive formatted to FAT32, with enough available storage space for all your recovery data.

    Best Regards,
    Eve Wang

    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Monday, August 10, 2015 9:12 AM
  • You might need a USB stick, which supports UEFI boot. This can be done using a freeware like Rufus.

    You may also need the ISO image of a Windows 8.1 installation media for the creation of the stick. Finally also copy proper subfolder from the server to the completed stick from C:\Program Files\Windows Server\Bin\ClientRestore\1FAE75EB-B11A-4883-BCEE-9AC1C6D95216 (here select the folder needed for your Surface OS - 32 Bit or 64 Bit).

    Boot from this stick, open a cmd prompt from Advanced recovery options and launch ClientRestoreWizard.exe from the copied folder.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf

    Monday, August 10, 2015 1:54 PM
  • Hi! Eve,

    Thanks for your comment - I know you are trying to help.

    To clarify, the USB drive was formatted to FAT32. The Secure Boot Control was disabled. Windows Home Server created the restore disk and said the operation completed successfully. I know all the information needed to start the restore operation is on the USB drive because it works correctly on all my desktop systems and on my HP Laptop.

    My conclusion is it is a Surface Pro problem! Since both WHS 2011 and the Surface Pro are Microsoft products, Microsoft should FIX the problem. Knowing Microsoft, that's never going to happen.

    I know there are people smarter than I am, so I posted the problem hoping that someone either has solved the problem or has a suggestion for a fix.

    (I tried formatting the USB drive as GPT FAT32 (using rufus 2.2), but WHS 2011 did not even recognize the USB drive! So much for that thought!)


    Ric Schecter (tyrone3a)

    Monday, August 10, 2015 5:44 PM
  • Hi! Olaf,

    I tried your suggestion. Rufus 2.2 sets the file system as NTFS when using the .iso of Windows 8.1. You can manually reset it to Large Fat32, but when you press start it reverts back to NTFS (or gives an error message). Everything I have read says that the boot USB must be FAT32 for the Surface Pro to boot from it. So it is a 'No Go'.

    Thanks! Any other thoughts, let me know.


    Ric Schecter (tyrone3a)

    Monday, August 10, 2015 10:11 PM
  • Hi Ric,

    did you select "GPT partition scheme for UEFI" in Partition Scheme section?

    This allowed File system defaulting to FAT32. In my test I used a Windows 8.1 ISO to generate the stick and could launch the Windows 8.1 setup environment on my Surface Pro 2. (An action which made me hectically look for my Bitlocker recovery key afterwards :-P )

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf

    Tuesday, August 11, 2015 12:50 PM
  • Hi! Olaf,

    As a result of your reply, I tried again to create a USB drive using Rufus 2.2. I verified that GPT partition scheme for UEFI was selected. I had trouble getting it to select and keep FAT32. I was finally able to get FAT32 (Large) to take and started the process. As you did, I used a Windows 8.1 ISO that I have used to create Windows 8.1 DVD's. After setting up the filing system and starting to transfer Win 8.1, the process encountered an error and failed. I tried the process again using a Windows 8 ISO. Again, the process failed. Rufus does not give an error code, so I don't know what failed or why.

    Just out of curiosity, what size was your USB Drive? I am using a 64GB drive.

    Thanks!


    Ric Schecter (tyrone3a)

    Tuesday, August 11, 2015 9:16 PM
  • I used a 16 GB drive and this allowed FAT32 without Large - for a 64 GB drive I tried Rufus wanted large FAT32, but I didn't want to overwrite that drive. Also Rufus has a log (second button in the bottom line), here is where I would assume details about the error. The log is also automatically updated, if you keep it open.

    Did you check, if the ISO file is accessible? Rightclick, Properties, is it still blocked as download from Internet? If so, unblock it.

    Can you mount it in Explorer (assuming you have at least Windows 8 or using a 3rd party tool) or burn a functional DVD from it? Should not be mounted during the process by any application to give Rufus full access.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf



    Wednesday, August 12, 2015 6:54 AM
  • Hi! Olaf,

    Thanks for your continued help/support!

    I was concerned about the type of errors I was getting and decided to switch to a computer I am trying to bring online that has a new Windows system install. I was able to successfully create a Win 8.1 GPT USB drive using Rufus 2.2. As you advised, I added the x64 sub-folder from the server. Then, with some effort, I was able to boot the Surface Pro using that USB drive. I followed your instructions, opened a DOS session and tried to  launch ClientRestoreWizard.exe from the copied folder. I received the following error message:

         ClientReserve Wizard Application Error

         The exception cannot continue. Windows cannot continue from this exception. (0xC0000025) occurred in the application at location 0X921e0a03.

         Click to terminate the program

    Not sure what all that means, but could not launch the restore process. Thinking that something needed might be missing, I added C:\Program Files\Windows Server\Bin\ClientRestore\ and all of its sub-folders to the USB boot drive. Repeated the procedure, but received the same error as above.

    We are slowly getting there, but at this point I have no idea how to proceed. Any thoughts?

    Thanks!


    Ric Schecter (tyrone3a)

    Wednesday, August 12, 2015 1:35 PM
  • Was it the identical edition (assuming 64 Bit source ISO image and 64 Bit subfolder for ClientRestore)?

    Last time I tried that process directly from setup environment, this was still with Windows 7 (maybe something changed in Windows 8.1 installation environment, just dont have the right machine here to try), for later restores of this kind I used Windows 2 Go (which either requires an external SSD/hard disk or a specific Windows 2 Go certified stick and a Enterprise Edition (trial works too) for creation.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf

    Wednesday, August 12, 2015 2:58 PM
  • Hi! Olaf,

    The .iso file I used was en_windows_8_1_x64_dvd_2707217.iso. It is the retail version, but probably one of the first released (ie, probably has no updates included). The ClientRestore folder was the X64 folder from the WHS2011 machine. The system had been updated with Hotfix KB2781272 over a year ago.

    I have a Windows 7 Pro iso file. Think I will try using that and see what happens. I also thought of using the Windows 7 Repair disk, but I would have to convert the DVD to an .iso file.

    My final thought is to just dump the Surface Pro in the trash! It is not much use if the software on it cannot be backed up and restored. (Interesting aside - I have been doing this for a long time. When they used tape for backups, the first thing I would do in checking out new programs/versions was to do a backup and then try to restore it to a blank HD. All programs could do the backup part, but almost all failed when it came time to restore. The software manufacturers spent all their energy on the backup side and neglected the restore side. Things don't seem to have changed much in 30 years!)

    Thanks again for your help.


    Ric Schecter (tyrone3a)

    Wednesday, August 12, 2015 4:53 PM
  • Well, you could reinstall the Surface software using the recovery image: https://www.microsoft.com/surface/de-de/support/warranty-service-and-recovery/downloadablerecoveryimage

    After that fresh setup install the connector software, and then mount the backup to recover the important data manually.

    If you want a bare metal recovery, there are some more culprits, such as only WLAN available, which will be an issue in Windows Preinstall Environment. A successful experience with an USB to LAN adapter, although with Windows Server Essentials 2012, has been described here.

    Best greeetings from Germany
    Olaf

    Wednesday, August 12, 2015 9:28 PM
  • Hi! Olaf,

    The use of a recovery image to reinstall the Surface software was suggested to me elsewhere. I fail to see how this will help. The problem is centered in the Surface BIOS. Reloading the software does not affect the BIOS. I have no trouble backing up the Surface - the problem is trying to restore. If I cannot boot the Surface and run the restore process, the issue is not resolved.

    The answer is really very simple: Microsoft should provide a bootable USB drive with each Surface! Or, more to Microsoft's style, provide a KB article with a download that creates a bootable drive using the Owner's USB drive. In each case, the resultant USB drive needs to be able to be modified (ie, added to) with programs like a backup recovery program.

    Thanks for your help, Olaf. At this point, I see no resolution. The Surface is an expensive but useless piece of junk! It is destined to go the way of the Windows phone - no matter how much money Microsoft spends trying to me it go.

    (Note: I tried to make both a Recovery USB and a Windows PE USB. Good old MS. The programs first format the USB drive - in MBR format! - so they are useless in solving the problem.)


    Ric Schecter (tyrone3a)

    Thursday, August 13, 2015 1:41 PM
  • Windows 8.1: As you said, 0xC0000025.
    Windows 7: Did not boot.

    So I just created a recovery drive from my already installed with Windows 10 Surface Pro 2 with the built in program on the stick, which Rufus already formatted with FAT32.

    Added the mentioned x64 folder to the stick and booted from it. Opened cmd prompt and launched ClientRestoreWizard successfully from there. So maybe its a bug limited to Windows 8.1 (8.0 not tested) and creating a USB stick with Windows 10 installation based on FAT32 volume could work.

    Sure, I have no WHS 2011 in the location for further testing, and no wired network adapter (USB to LAN) for my Surface at all, so the restore process itself would still fail.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf


    Friday, August 14, 2015 12:26 PM
  • Hi! Olaf,

    I admire your tenacity and appreciate your desire to find a solution.

    I will update a computer I have to Windows 10, format a USB drive appropriately in Rufus 2.2 and make a (Windows 10) recovery drive. I will add the X64 folder to the stick and see if I can boot the Surface Pro and run the Restore program. I do have a USB to LAN stick (not having a LAN port on the Surface Pro is a major error on Microsoft's part), but do not know if the driver will work on later versions of Windows. (I don't want to update the Surface Pro from 8.1 to 10 until I know I can run a restore because of the problems I had trying to get my 8.1 system back before.) Will update you when I have some results.

    Warmest Regards,


    Ric Schecter (tyrone3a)

    Friday, August 14, 2015 6:00 PM
  • Hi! Olaf,

    Some progress, but in the end another failure. Formatted USB drive as GPT/FAT32 using Rufus 2.2. I purchased two different USB 3.0 to LAN adapters - one that stated no driver required and another that required a driver to be installed (Cost $42). Used Windows 10 to create a Recovery Drive and added the x64 folder from WHS 2011. The Surface was able to boot from the USB drive and I was able to run the Client Restore Wizard from the Command "Window". The Restore Wizard was not able to find the WHS 2011 server! I tried both adapters, but the result was the same - server not found. (Note: Cannot install the driver for the one adapter in "Recovery" mode.)

    I will check to see if the adapters work with the Surface Pro while running Windows 8.1. If they both work, seems like another good idea bites the dust.

    Regards,


    Ric Schecter (tyrone3a)

    Tuesday, August 18, 2015 1:29 PM
  • Hi! Olaf,

    Booted Surface Pro normally (to Windows 8.1). Both USB to LAN adapters worked perfectly - one without any driver installed and the other after installing the driver. They just don't work in the Recovery environment.

    Regards -


    Ric Schecter (tyrone3a)

    Tuesday, August 18, 2015 8:56 PM
  • (Note: Cannot install the driver for the one adapter in "Recovery" mode.)

    This is normal, you need already extracted drivers, in this case for 64 Bit OS.

    I think you could add them via dism to the recovery image. About server not found ... can you ping it from cmd prompt via name and via IP address?

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf

    Wednesday, August 19, 2015 2:53 PM
  • Hi! Olaf,

    This might work for the adapter that needed a driver installed to work. The other adapter, however, did not need a driver. It should have worked, but did not.

    Normally, if I was having trouble doing a restore, I would simply remove the HD from the computer and attach it to another computer. WHS 2011 does not care where the drive is located - you just say which backup you want to restore and the location to restore it to. Microsoft made that avenue impossible (I am not going to use a heat gun on a $1,500 piece of electronic equipment) by preventing the end user from opening the case.

    If Microsoft wants me to buy any equipment/hardware manufactured by them in the future, they can come to my home and kiss my backside. Until then, the Surface Pro will have a dishonored place in my home keeping my closet door open. An expensive doorstop, but appropriate for the piece of garbage it is.

    Thanks for all your help, Olaf, but I have reached the end of the line. Dell Computer - here I come.

    Regards,


    Ric Schecter (tyrone3a)

    Wednesday, August 19, 2015 9:02 PM
  • What happens if you connect both the stick and the network interface to the surface at the same time?

    (Would require some USB hub with an own power supply from which booting works.)

    And last but least a Windows 2 Go installation as boot medium which would require to unhide the local disk in disk management before you could attempt a restore from there.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf

    Thursday, August 20, 2015 2:27 PM
  • Hi! Olaf,

    Not sure what you mean "connect both the stick and the network interface". One of the USB to network adapters I purchased had a USB hub and three USB 3.0 connectors (in addition to the LAN connector). It does not have external power and required an installed driver to work. I have an external USB 2.0 hub that is powered externally that I could try. Not sure if it needs a separate driver to work.

    I have looked at the Windows 2 Go option. It is expensive and is supposed to require Windows 10 Enterprise edition. I can download the Win 10 Enterprise edition for free, but I would still have to buy a USB drive from IronKey, for example. The IronKey W300 Workspace 32GB drive is $129.00. The IronKey Windows To Go Intro Kit is $89.00 plus the cost of Win 8.1 Enterprise software.

    Unless Microsoft wants to hire me as a consultant, I have wasted enough time and money already. I am definitely NOT investing any more of my own money to solve their mistake.

    Again, many thanks for your interest and suggestions.

    Regards,


    Ric Schecter (tyrone3a)

    Thursday, August 20, 2015 6:34 PM
  • Hi Ric,

    an external harddisk or SSD is also working with Windows 2 Go, less expensive and more usable.

    (For my own testing I once recompiled and properly signed a driver found in the web - something for a Hitachi device - and can use Windows 2 Go with it on a normal USB stick with that driver integrated.)

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf

    Friday, August 21, 2015 9:20 AM
  • Sorry Olaf,

    A USB 3.0 external powered hub does not work either. Able to boot from USB drive and run Client Restore Wizard. USB to LAN powered and functional, but still cannot connect to WHS2011 server. Connecting with the address of the server (eg, 192.168.1.125) gives an unknown error message.

    Since you are essentially running in a DOS environment, I doubt it is possible to establish a LAN connection.

    Regards,


    Ric Schecter (tyrone3a)

    Sunday, August 23, 2015 3:25 AM
  • If I find the time (I am usually late at home and currently a lot of garden work once arrived) I will test my Windows to Go 8.1 based SSD with my Surface Pro 2.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf

    Tuesday, August 25, 2015 2:42 PM
  • It seems to be an issue indeed, which happens in both Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 to Go as well.

    As soon as the server has been found (even through WLAN) and the password input window appears, ClientRestoreWizard crashes. If I call the wizard in an environment without server, the crash does not happen.

    Seems there is really a bug in the restore component which eventually only appears in context with the Surface, which never got fixed.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf


    Friday, September 4, 2015 12:11 PM
  • Hi! Olaf,

    Thanks for the confirmation. You did a lot of work and I appreciate it. Too bad Microsoft will not acknowledge the problem and therefore will not fix it. Regardless, know that I appreciate you.

    Now, if you would like another challenge, it appears that Microsoft also has a problem with the virtual machine (VA) in Windows 10. While I can get a VA started, no matter what I do I cannot establish a network connection. I can run an XP virtual machine, but cannot get to the internet to activate XP. Perhaps when you catch your breath, you can look into it (and again, hopefully, validate my findings).

    Warmest Regards,


    Ric Schecter (tyrone3a)

    Friday, September 4, 2015 5:05 PM
  • That would be more than a little off topic here.

    Wasn't Windows XP blocking access, if not activated? If so its hard to check the configuration of network, may simply be a lack of drivers (integration components). You could eventually try a legacy network adapter. Phone activation would be another option.

    My Intel NUC based test machine is running Windows 10 Enterprise (upgraded from Windows 8.1) and neither Windows 7 nor Windows 10 VMs hosted show up with connectivity problems.

    The LAN adapter of the host however did not receive DHCP addresses on the wired connection (the wireless interface was not giving issues), assigning a fixed IP configuration and reboot the machine did solve the problem of no access (at least I assume that was it what solved the problem to word it correctly).

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf

    Monday, September 7, 2015 12:46 PM
  • Hi! Olaf,

    It was off topic - sorry.

    Thanks for the reply. Will have to follow up with MS on the Win 10 VM.

    Warmest Regards,


    Ric Schecter (tyrone3a)

    Thursday, September 10, 2015 9:06 PM