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Help with a Switch RRS feed

  • Question

  • ok right now i got my WHS and 3 or my computers
    i know that a switch gets better throughput for data and all but i cant for the life of me seem to get it to work w/ WHS
    what am i doing wrong?
    all the other computers connect fine but when i connect WHS it says limited connectivity. !??!?!?! when i plug in my belkin n1 vision it works perfectly fine
    the only thing i can even come close to think of is that the router hands out the ips w/ dhcp and obviously a switch doesnt
    so any suggestions would help on how to set up my WHS on a switch
    btw its a netgear 8 port gigabit switch
    Monday, May 26, 2008 7:21 AM

Answers

  • David,

     

    Following on from your response above...

    The IP Address range you are being allocated, is because all your machines are set to DHCP and there is no DHCP server. But thats OK you don't really need one. It does mean that you will have to allocate IP Addresses yourself.

     

    I suggest you select a C class, and the vast majority of budding Networkers will choose 192.168.1.0 with a SubNet mask of 255.255.255.0. I'll assume you will accept the suggestion, and if you feel you want to be an individual you can change the third byte (.1) for any number between .1 & .254. So if you decided you wanted .199 your network would be 192.168.199.0. That's the first hurdle crossed.

     

     

    Next you must allocate the WHS Server an IP Address from your selected range. Again I would suggest 192.168.1.10 use a SubNet mask of 255.255.255.0.

     

    Next you must allocate each WHS Client with an individual IP Address, Start at .20 and work upwards. E.G. the first PC will get 192.168.1.20, the next will get 192.168.1.21, the next 192.168.1.22 and so on. They will all have a SubNet mask of 255.255.255.0

     

    Having successfully done the above, you should find all your Systems will see each other.

     

    To troubleshoot, use a CMD session.

    IPCONFIG is useful to show the IP Address allocated to the system you are currently working on.

    PING is useful to confirm you can talk to other Systems on your network. (E.G. from the WHS you should be able to PING 192.168.1.20 and the first PC should reply. Of course all systems must be up and running for PING to work.

     

    The above will only resolve your internal network switch issue. If you now want to talk to the outside world, then you are going to have to deploy a Router, and then we head into another set of Network configuration dialogs.

     

    Good luck.

     

     

    Tuesday, May 27, 2008 10:37 AM

All replies

  • David,

     

    I'm not sure of your expertise with networking, so please forgive the level I'm pitching this if its too low level.

     

    Have you decided on an IP Network range for your home network?

     

    Whilst I wait for a response to that can you run a CMD session on each system and provide the output (specifically the IP Address or IPV4 Address) of each machine? You do this by in the CMD session, type IPCONFIG<ENTER>.

     

    Basically they should all be on the same network, but different host addresses (the last byte of the IP Address).

     

    Are you OK with this level of diagnosis? Too high or too low?

    Monday, May 26, 2008 12:49 PM
  • i do know a fair amount about networking but still i can be hesitant cuz i obviously dont know everything but for the ip network range the ip it is giving me is a bad ip
    just to make this easy im doing this with jus one client then the WHS
    the clients
    ip is 168.254.56.191
    subnet 255.255.0.0
    default gateway -blank-

    \WHS coonection-specific dns suffix-blank-
    autoconfig ip - 169.254.216.28
    subnet 255.255.0.0
    ip address fe80:21e:8cff:fead:28cb5%4
    default gateway -blank-

    i dont claim to know what is rong but the subnet mask are looking a lil funky cuz arent they suppose to be 255.255.255.0 if you have like under 100 computers are sumthing like that class c network i think its call idk i forgot all the stuff that one of my classes taught me

    the level of diag is fine cept i dont really get the part when u mean specifiy a network ip range
    Monday, May 26, 2008 7:04 PM
  • I don't understand why you want to remove the router out of the set-up. Leave the router handle the DHCP requests, connect the switch to the router and all the wired computers to the switch.
    Monday, May 26, 2008 10:19 PM
  • the reason i want to take the router out is because a switch is proven to get better data throughput speeds than a router. yeah i do lost the wireless capability but i think i could hoook the router to the switch. after i get everythign set up w/ the switch and still get wireless internet. but thats the main reason...to get better data throughput..
    Monday, May 26, 2008 10:36 PM
  • David, without a router, there is nothing on your network to hand out IP addresses. (I.e. no DHCP server) Without a DHCP server, Windows-based PCs use Automatic Private IP Addressing, which generates a random IP address in the 169.254.x.x Class B address space.

    Using APIPA may cause a number of problems. You should reconnect your router, then connect the switch to the router, as another poster has recommended.
    Tuesday, May 27, 2008 12:44 AM
    Moderator
  • The overhead of a router compared to a switch is marginal. If you see a major diference in speed, then the router is probably messed up. All a router is, is a switch with a firewall. You said the switch is gigbit, but is the router also? Why not just get a gigabit router and call it a day?

    99.9% of the time I get the "limited connectivity" error is because the ip, subnet, gateway, or dns is wrong.

    10:
    1.25MB/sec (10MBaseT) </= Cat5
    100: 12.5MB/sec (100MBaseT) Cat5
    1000: 128MB/sec (1GBaseT) Cat5e
    10000: 1250MB/sec (10GBaseT) Cat6

    If your hard drives can't read/write faster than 12.5MB/sec, gigabit is pointless. Newer SATA drives will hit about 40-60MB/sec, but you'll get nowhere near gigabit speeds until traditional hard drives are replaced with something faster. Same reason no one really takes cat6 seriously, who needs or has devices that can read/write faster than 128MB/sec? Or actually have a need for 1250MB/sec for that matter.
    Tuesday, May 27, 2008 1:02 AM
  • yes i do understand that it give an auto ip but the weird fact is that when i conect all my machines i can actually access the server even thought it says limited connectivity. No a router has more function than  just a little firewall.it has the dhcp, port forwarding , port triggering ,l and upnp. i know switches might have some of these but not the cheap 70 dollar ones you buy from best buy or circuit city it has to be the 1000 dollar ones from cisco. also i got new sata drives some are 500gb 3 are 1tb they all have raid 5 put on them (yes i know cant have more than a 2tb limit on the mbr) with that raid 5 it gives all of the sata drives a boost in performace obviously b/c they are reading all at the same time w/ parts of data on them plus they have parity Smile

    im just tempted to switch over to server 2008 where it take the real potentail. i could virtualize WHS for the back ups and set up DHCP on the server instead of my router and and add MORE than 10 users, make a better remote connect page. the only reason i stick w/ WHS is cuz im lazy and dont really want to go through all the hassle of setting all that *** up
    Tuesday, May 27, 2008 1:24 AM
  • David,

     

    Following on from your response above...

    The IP Address range you are being allocated, is because all your machines are set to DHCP and there is no DHCP server. But thats OK you don't really need one. It does mean that you will have to allocate IP Addresses yourself.

     

    I suggest you select a C class, and the vast majority of budding Networkers will choose 192.168.1.0 with a SubNet mask of 255.255.255.0. I'll assume you will accept the suggestion, and if you feel you want to be an individual you can change the third byte (.1) for any number between .1 & .254. So if you decided you wanted .199 your network would be 192.168.199.0. That's the first hurdle crossed.

     

     

    Next you must allocate the WHS Server an IP Address from your selected range. Again I would suggest 192.168.1.10 use a SubNet mask of 255.255.255.0.

     

    Next you must allocate each WHS Client with an individual IP Address, Start at .20 and work upwards. E.G. the first PC will get 192.168.1.20, the next will get 192.168.1.21, the next 192.168.1.22 and so on. They will all have a SubNet mask of 255.255.255.0

     

    Having successfully done the above, you should find all your Systems will see each other.

     

    To troubleshoot, use a CMD session.

    IPCONFIG is useful to show the IP Address allocated to the system you are currently working on.

    PING is useful to confirm you can talk to other Systems on your network. (E.G. from the WHS you should be able to PING 192.168.1.20 and the first PC should reply. Of course all systems must be up and running for PING to work.

     

    The above will only resolve your internal network switch issue. If you now want to talk to the outside world, then you are going to have to deploy a Router, and then we head into another set of Network configuration dialogs.

     

    Good luck.

     

     

    Tuesday, May 27, 2008 10:37 AM