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installing xp oem on new system RRS feed

  • Question

  • Ok, win isn't exactly my os of preference, but I have a workflow of different apps which find common ground on this code.  I have an XP PRO OEM which I bought for a system that I myself built.  The system was a semp 3000plus 2gb ram msi mobo ati graphics card, the new system I am building is far superior to say the least.  Though I have seen many threads regarding the microsoft genuine advantage(tm)(c) and validation issues due to the database on redmond's server, I still don't feel as if my question was answered.    Now, I suppose my system has been tied to the os via the database, am I correct in assuming this? since I have a oem disc which is NOT tied to a large manufacturer such as dell or gateway, hp etc etc etc.... can I still install it in the new system without having to get on the horn with MS to get another key? or will the database spit back "your software may not be genuine" blah blah?   Solutions? I am not throwing down another 150 for another xp pro when I have a legal copy already.
    Wednesday, November 28, 2007 9:53 AM

Answers

  • One basic reason a Windows XP OEM license costs less than a conventional "retail license" is because an OEM license is permenantly tied to the very first computer it is installed and activated on. A "retail license" does not have this limitation. OEM licensing was designed as a single use license that only permits a motherboard change if the original motherboard is defective and is replaced with the exact same model motherboard.  You should have purchased a "retail license" if upgrading to a new motherboard or computer was anticipated.

     

    Wednesday, November 28, 2007 6:39 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • yes ..u anticipated right, MS will require you to buy another key for the new system. The only way you can go around it if you were replacing a defective motherboard.
    Wednesday, November 28, 2007 12:48 PM
  • that is amazing...you would think that a database would be sophisticated enough to tell if another machine with the same liscence had recieved updates lately or contacted MS via Genuine Advantage.   I understand the need to keep piracy in check, but to say an end user has no freedom with the software which they legally purchased to transfer to another system is incredibly unfriendly.     The older system's hard drive will be reformatted and a different OS installed onto it... so what is the price for a new liscence?  I can't believe my disc now is useless just because I am FORCED to upgrade to work with all the apps I use...adobe creative suite, maya unlimited, xsi softimage, cinema 4d, mudbox, and AVID....geez this is highly disconcerting.....  I do understand what you said about the mobo, but still......
    Wednesday, November 28, 2007 6:07 PM
  • One basic reason a Windows XP OEM license costs less than a conventional "retail license" is because an OEM license is permenantly tied to the very first computer it is installed and activated on. A "retail license" does not have this limitation. OEM licensing was designed as a single use license that only permits a motherboard change if the original motherboard is defective and is replaced with the exact same model motherboard.  You should have purchased a "retail license" if upgrading to a new motherboard or computer was anticipated.

     

    Wednesday, November 28, 2007 6:39 PM
    Moderator