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System Drive replacement (in a two drive non-duplicated configuration) RRS feed

  • Question

  • When I installed WHS I did not understand how it allocated space. I thought using a small drive for system, and a larger drive for data would be good. I later found out that the system likes to use the system drive for system data. I also later leared that the larger drive should be the system drive.

    Now I have a configuration with system drive (80G) and a secodary drive (500G).

    I would like to replace the 80G with a 1TB drive. However, I have over 80G of files, so I am sure that not all of them are on the 80G. I do not know if all of them are on the 500G.

    What is my best bet at upgrading the system drive? Do I have to start over?

    Thanks,
    Greg
    Sunday, August 9, 2009 10:44 PM

Answers

  • When I installed WHS I did not understand how it allocated space. I thought using a small drive for system, and a larger drive for data would be good. I later found out that the system likes to use the system drive for system data. I also later leared that the larger drive should be the system drive.

    While that was true at one point (pre Power Pack 1), that is no longer the case.

    Now I have a configuration with system drive (80G) and a secodary drive (500G).

    I would like to replace the 80G with a 1TB drive. However, I have over 80G of files, so I am sure that not all of them are on the 80G. I do not know if all of them are on the 500G.

    What is my best bet at upgrading the system drive? Do I have to start over?

    Thanks,
    Greg
    Frankly, I wouldn't worry about it.  As long as your server is up-to-date, no files will be added to your primary drive unless there is insufficient free space on the other drives in your server.  My suggestion is to add the 1 TB drive to the storage pool and enjoy your server. :)

    However, if you really want to do it, see the FAQ post:  How do I upgrade from the evaluation/trial to a full copy of WHS? (even though it's not your situation, the process is the same).
    • Proposed as answer by kariya21Moderator Monday, August 10, 2009 4:38 AM
    • Marked as answer by forsethg Tuesday, August 11, 2009 4:51 AM
    Monday, August 10, 2009 4:36 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • When I installed WHS I did not understand how it allocated space. I thought using a small drive for system, and a larger drive for data would be good. I later found out that the system likes to use the system drive for system data. I also later leared that the larger drive should be the system drive.

    While that was true at one point (pre Power Pack 1), that is no longer the case.

    Now I have a configuration with system drive (80G) and a secodary drive (500G).

    I would like to replace the 80G with a 1TB drive. However, I have over 80G of files, so I am sure that not all of them are on the 80G. I do not know if all of them are on the 500G.

    What is my best bet at upgrading the system drive? Do I have to start over?

    Thanks,
    Greg
    Frankly, I wouldn't worry about it.  As long as your server is up-to-date, no files will be added to your primary drive unless there is insufficient free space on the other drives in your server.  My suggestion is to add the 1 TB drive to the storage pool and enjoy your server. :)

    However, if you really want to do it, see the FAQ post:  How do I upgrade from the evaluation/trial to a full copy of WHS? (even though it's not your situation, the process is the same).
    • Proposed as answer by kariya21Moderator Monday, August 10, 2009 4:38 AM
    • Marked as answer by forsethg Tuesday, August 11, 2009 4:51 AM
    Monday, August 10, 2009 4:36 AM
    Moderator
  • I did swap the 80G with the 1T, followed by system reinstall. It was relatively painless (after negotiating past the SATA driver issue again).
    It looks like I kept all of the backups intact. (At least most, I did not check thoroughly.)

    I haven't kept up with the improvements, because the system does a good job of running on its own.

    Now, if I pull the 500G (secondary), will the backups have replicated to my primary?

    Thank you,
    Greg
    Tuesday, August 11, 2009 4:59 AM
  • I did swap the 80G with the 1T, followed by system reinstall. It was relatively painless (after negotiating past the SATA driver issue again).
    It looks like I kept all of the backups intact. (At least most, I did not check thoroughly.)

    I haven't kept up with the improvements, because the system does a good job of running on its own.

    Now, if I pull the 500G (secondary), will the backups have replicated to my primary?

    Thank you,
    Greg

    When you remove the 500 GB drive through the Console, it will move all of the data (shares and backup database) to the only drive left (your 1 TB primary drive).
    Saturday, August 15, 2009 3:35 PM
    Moderator
  • I'm in a similar position. I built a system with an 80GB IDE primary drive. After copying some data to it from a 160GB WD IDE external USB drive, I took the 160GB drive out of its housing and added it to the pool.

    After backups of 4 clients, 2 of which have lots of media, I have 50 GB free space. The WHS Disk Mgmt Add-In tells me the secondary drive has only 21 GB free. I've ordered a 1TB SATA drive which I'll add to the pool, then take the 160GB drive back out. At that point I don't think I can do duplication, since I'll only have one drive of any size. That will come later when I buy a 2nd 1 TB drive.

    Question: after all data is off the 160GB drive, is it worthwhile to rebuild the server with the 160GB drive as the primary? The 80GB would become a paperweight. The performance specs of the 80GB are better than the 160GB. I'm guessing that's not a huge deal since I'm not running a multi-client POS system or streaming HD video to simultaneous users.

    Alternatively, I could leave the 160GB drive in the system, but take it out of the pool. I think that provides some means of manual backup? Is 160GB anywhere near enough to do that, if the secondary drive in the pool is 1 TB?

    Thanks for your help.

    Chris
    Tuesday, September 1, 2009 2:11 AM
  • I'm in a similar position. I built a system with an 80GB IDE primary drive. After copying some data to it from a 160GB WD IDE external USB drive, I took the 160GB drive out of its housing and added it to the pool.

    After backups of 4 clients, 2 of which have lots of media, I have 50 GB free space. The WHS Disk Mgmt Add-In tells me the secondary drive has only 21 GB free. I've ordered a 1TB SATA drive which I'll add to the pool, then take the 160GB drive back out. At that point I don't think I can do duplication, since I'll only have one drive of any size. That will come later when I buy a 2nd 1 TB drive.

    Question: after all data is off the 160GB drive, is it worthwhile to rebuild the server with the 160GB drive as the primary?

    IMO, no.  Files are only stored on the primary drive when there is no room anywhere else.

    The 80GB would become a paperweight. The performance specs of the 80GB are better than the 160GB. I'm guessing that's not a huge deal since I'm not running a multi-client POS system or streaming HD video to simultaneous users.

    Alternatively, I could leave the 160GB drive in the system, but take it out of the pool. I think that provides some means of manual backup?

    You can only use it to backup your network shares if it's a removable type of hard drive (which means, in your case, put it back in the USB enclosure so it will be recognized as an external drive).

    Is 160GB anywhere near enough to do that, if the secondary drive in the pool is 1 TB?

    There is no compression for server backups, which means you can only back up a total of 160 GB of data to a 160 GB drive.

    Thanks for your help.

    Chris

    Tuesday, September 1, 2009 2:18 AM
    Moderator
  • Q: ... after all data is off the 160GB drive, is it worthwhile to rebuild the server with the 160GB drive as the primary?

    A: IMO, no.  Files are only stored on the primary drive when there is no room anywhere else.

    Q: Alternatively, I could leave the 160GB drive in the system, but take it out of the pool. I think that provides some means of manual backup?  ... Is 160GB anywhere near enough to do that, if the secondary drive in the pool is 1 TB?

    A: You can only use it to backup your network shares if it's a removable type of hard drive (which means, in your case, put it back in the USB enclosure so it will be recognized as an external drive). ... There is no compression for server backups, which means you can only back up a total of 160 GB of data to a 160 GB drive.

    With respect to file storage on the primary drive, I've read elsewhere that storage space available on the primary drive determines the largest file that can be transferred to the secondary drives, since it's a temporary repository. Considering that I won't be storing the BD version of War and Peace, is that a real issue in practical terms?

    As to the disposition of the 160GB drive, it's a clunky 3.5" drive with an external power brick. It's likely to become a paperweight or a boat anchor.
    Tuesday, September 1, 2009 3:42 AM
  • With respect to file storage on the primary drive, I've read elsewhere that storage space available on the primary drive determines the largest file that can be transferred to the secondary drives, since it's a temporary repository.

    That's no longer the case.  Power Pack 1 changed that.

    Considering that I won't be storing the BD version of War and Peace, is that a real issue in practical terms?

    As to the disposition of the 160GB drive, it's a clunky 3.5" drive with an external power brick. It's likely to become a paperweight or a boat anchor.

    Tuesday, September 1, 2009 4:42 AM
    Moderator
  • With respect to file storage on the primary drive, I've read elsewhere that storage space available on the primary drive determines the largest file that can be transferred to the secondary drives, since it's a temporary repository.

    That's no longer the case.  Power Pack 1 changed that.
    Excellent. Thanks.
    Tuesday, September 1, 2009 5:12 AM