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AMD/ATI no support of WHS RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi Folks... maybe someone ran into the issue and found some driver to resolve... but I built my own computer and planned to use it as a home server and a home media center that will go thru my Yamaha receiver via HDMI on to my LCD tv.  Well, not knowing a whole lot about WHS, but seeing awesome reviews, it convinced me to purchase... thinking, what could go wrong...

    I wanted a fast, upgradable, but reasonably priced motherboard/CPU, so I looked at the AMD stock.  Without realizing that WHS needed its own drivers for everything, I purchased the Gigabyte MA785GM-US2H motherboard with a AMD Athlon II X2 245 2.9Ghz AM3 CPU.

    To make a long story short, this motherboard comes with built-in HDMI... GREAT!  But the on-board graphics is a ATI HD-4200...  The drivers from the manufacturer CD errors, although the server is going.. I am limited.  There are no drivers for WHS on Gigabyte or ATI's website.  I contacted AMD (who merged with ATI) and they simply wrote back with a snotty attitude and said, "We do not support Windows Home Server".

    I really really need the HDMI (with sound), but of course the screen barely works, but errors on alot of things... and the sound is horrible thru the HDMI.

    Has anyone familiar with this motherboard found a work-around?  Any help is appreciated...

    I suppose my last alternative is to turn of the on-board graphics and purchase an expensive graphics card with HDMI.  I was hoping not to do that...  Anyone?

    Friday, December 4, 2009 12:52 PM

Answers

  • Use Windows Server 2003 drivers if available, since that's the base OS. If not available, try XP.

    But using your server as a media center PC is likely to prove an exercise in frustration; it's not designed for users to do anything on the server desktop, and a media center PC is all about the desktop and "10 foot" (also desktop, really) experiences.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Friday, December 4, 2009 1:49 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Use Windows Server 2003 drivers if available, since that's the base OS. If not available, try XP.

    But using your server as a media center PC is likely to prove an exercise in frustration; it's not designed for users to do anything on the server desktop, and a media center PC is all about the desktop and "10 foot" (also desktop, really) experiences.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Friday, December 4, 2009 1:49 PM
    Moderator
  • Use Windows Server 2003 drivers if available, since that's the base OS. If not available, try XP.

    But using your server as a media center PC is likely to prove an exercise in frustration; it's not designed for users to do anything on the server desktop, and a media center PC is all about the desktop and "10 foot" (also desktop, really) experiences.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)

    I see... so WHS is basically a glorified backup system, and not much more?  What's the sense, the point?  Maybe there is a Windows 7 or XP software that will act as a server backup?  Maybe that is what I should do...  I do love the easy setup to remotely connect... but there should be more if MS and customers expect vendor support!  I scathed the Internet from top to bottom and I haven't found one add-in that is worth my time.

    Sorry, I am new to WHS.  Besides the backup feature... I am beginning to have my doubts about its purpose!  A home server is not a corporate server... there should be more to WHS and supporting it as a HTPC would be the right direction... anything less than that is just... a glorified backup server.  With this limitation, it should be free... since it doesn't do much and vendor support is practically nil...  Sorry, I am a bit frustrated after paying for something I really don't need!

    ~ signed ~
    MS screws me over again...
    Friday, December 4, 2009 2:07 PM
  • I see you have commented on another thread ( http://social.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/whssoftware/thread/9171a703-465b-4985-8dac-2014bd5f5e8c )and have replied there but here you give more detail.

    I am using an ASUS ATI card (3650 fanless) in my homebuilt server. I use drivers from those supplied by AMD with the card.
    I suggest you serach your CD for XP drivers. Generally WHS will accept XP (32 bit) purposed drivers. I would expect you to be able, at minmum to get reasonable graphics; HDMI will be harder.

    Good luck
    David
    Friday, December 4, 2009 4:01 PM
  •  I am a bit frustrated after paying for something I really don't need!

    It sounds like you really want a HTPC connected to your TV running Windows Media Center.  WHS will not be useful for that, but, if you record TV programs or have a large quantity of media files, WHS integrates nicely with Windows Media Center for file storage.   It also does a decent job of protecting your files in case of a hard drive failure.  A two box solution is your best bet.

    Saturday, December 5, 2009 12:25 AM
  • This is not officially supported by WHS team, but you might try running WHS in a virtual machine, with Windows 7 running directly on your HTPC hardware. WHS is intended to be headless, and virtualization is ideal for a headless machine. You can always Remote Desktop into it if you have to (I find Remote Desktop runs much better than the built-in windowing system of most virtualization products).

    I would suggest the (free) VMWare Server as virtualization technology, as Microsoft's Virtual Server will not run on Windows 7 (at least not without some serious hoop-jumping).

    This idea of a virtual WHS running on a Windows Media Center PC seems extremely attractive to me, and I think it is a great shame that it is not officially supported. Many people are doing it though. I myself have been trying it out using Microsoft Virtual Server on an XP host attached to my HDTV. I have the WHS files on an external RAID1 SATA enclosure, using a single large SCSI virtual disk. It certainly works, even though the host is underpowered (and is not a Media Center PC).

    David Wilkinson | Visual C++ MVP
    Saturday, December 5, 2009 1:16 PM
  • Microsoft Virtual PC 6.1 will work quite happily on Windows 7 - I was using it the other day to run a VM version of WHS under Windows 7 64 bit.
    Sunday, December 6, 2009 4:04 PM
  • Microsoft Virtual PC 6.1 will work quite happily on Windows 7 - I was using it the other day to run a VM version of WHS under Windows 7 64 bit.

    Yes, that is certainly one way to go, but a desktop virtualization solution is not ideal for a server guest.

    More importantly, for me at least, MVPC does not support SCSI disks, so disk size is limited to 128GB.

    And, of course, you need a host machine with hardware virtualization.

    David Wilkinson | Visual C++ MVP
    Sunday, December 6, 2009 4:32 PM
  • This is not officially supported by WHS team, but you might try running WHS in a virtual machine, with Windows 7 running directly on your HTPC hardware. WHS is intended to be headless, and virtualization is ideal for a headless machine. You can always Remote Desktop into it if you have to (I find Remote Desktop runs much better than the built-in windowing system of most virtualization products).

    I would suggest the (free) VMWare Server as virtualization technology, as Microsoft's Virtual Server will not run on Windows 7 (at least not without some serious hoop-jumping).

    This idea of a virtual WHS running on a Windows Media Center PC seems extremely attractive to me, and I think it is a great shame that it is not officially supported. Many people are doing it though. I myself have been trying it out using Microsoft Virtual Server on an XP host attached to my HDTV. I have the WHS files on an external RAID1 SATA enclosure, using a single large SCSI virtual disk. It certainly works, even though the host is underpowered (and is not a Media Center PC).

    David Wilkinson | Visual C++ MVP
    David,  first let me say that I resolved my issue and went out and purchased a separate graphics card that was non-ATI... but resorted to optical and lost the HDMI.   But I am curious about the virtualization.  I understand the concept but I never installed it or played with it.  So if you had the WHS operating within a virtual machine... the operating and backup space for WHS would be limited to what you set in the virtual machine setup (basically a partition)... is that correct?  The power goes out.. wouldn't you lose it all?  Or am I totally lost at the virtualization technology?

    Tuesday, December 29, 2009 1:46 PM
  • David,  first let me say that I resolved my issue and went out and purchased a separate graphics card that was non-ATI... but resorted to optical and lost the HDMI.   But I am curious about the virtualization.  I understand the concept but I never installed it or played with it.  So if you had the WHS operating within a virtual machine... the operating and backup space for WHS would be limited to what you set in the virtual machine setup (basically a partition)... is that correct?  The power goes out.. wouldn't you lose it all?  Or am I totally lost at the virtualization technology?
    The files of a virtual machine live on a "virtual hard drive" which is a file (extension .vhd) on the host system. If the power goes out, the situation is no different from when you lose power on a physical machine. Anything in memory is lost, but everything that has been saved to disk is preserved.

    That said, I have both the host machine and the external RAID1 enclosure on a UPS.

    David Wilkinson | Visual C++ MVP
    Tuesday, December 29, 2009 2:00 PM