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Licensing of Windows 7 Home Premium RRS feed

  • Question

  • I see where the OEM versions of Windows 7 Home Premium cannot be transfered to another computer due to licensing issues.  To resolve this, can I purchase a retail version of Windows 7 Home Premium with a valid license,  and transfer the disk drive to another computer and activate using the new  license?  I would like to do this to avoid having to re-install all of the software I have with the current configuration.

    Thank you.

    Tuesday, June 26, 2012 10:59 AM

Answers

  • "johnboyZXL" wrote in message news:579ef835-9aa8-46c2-92a3-ab7c9555eaac...

    I see where the OEM versions of Windows 7 Home Premium cannot be transfered to another computer due to licensing issues.  To resolve this, can I purchase a retail version of Windows 7 Home Premium with a valid license,  and transfer the disk drive to another computer and activate using the new  license?  I would like to do this to avoid having to re-install all of the software I have with the current configuration.

    Thank you.

    Yes, that would work.
    However, a few words of warning.
    1) Don't buy your license from anywhere other than a reputable well-known dealer - most sales on places like eBay or the Amazon Marketplace are counterfeit.
    2) You will almost certainly need to reinstall Windows after the change-over, unless the motherboards use the same HAL - there are always risks, so back up to external media if you can, prior to the changeover.
    3) Make sure that your purchase is at least the same Service Pack level as the current install, as well as being the same edition (or higher).
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Tuesday, June 26, 2012 12:00 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • "johnboyZXL" wrote in message news:579ef835-9aa8-46c2-92a3-ab7c9555eaac...

    I see where the OEM versions of Windows 7 Home Premium cannot be transfered to another computer due to licensing issues.  To resolve this, can I purchase a retail version of Windows 7 Home Premium with a valid license,  and transfer the disk drive to another computer and activate using the new  license?  I would like to do this to avoid having to re-install all of the software I have with the current configuration.

    Thank you.

    Yes, that would work.
    However, a few words of warning.
    1) Don't buy your license from anywhere other than a reputable well-known dealer - most sales on places like eBay or the Amazon Marketplace are counterfeit.
    2) You will almost certainly need to reinstall Windows after the change-over, unless the motherboards use the same HAL - there are always risks, so back up to external media if you can, prior to the changeover.
    3) Make sure that your purchase is at least the same Service Pack level as the current install, as well as being the same edition (or higher).
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Tuesday, June 26, 2012 12:00 PM
    Moderator
  • Noel,

    The HAL problem has all but disappeared with x64.  There has only been one HAL driver for all of x64 since Vista.  I seriously doubt that the OP will need to do any kind of repair-in-place upgrade (aka repair install).  I just completed the operation the OP describes on two desktop computers.  I swapped the system and data drives between the towers in order to leverage the newer hardware in my testbox for my daily computing.  Both towers woke up hungry for drivers and needing reactivation.  Since both were custom builds I had the driver disks ready at hand and everything went without a glitch.  I am optimistic that the OP will not have a problem as long as he has the networking driver ready to install.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.

    Tuesday, June 26, 2012 1:56 PM
    Answerer
  • Thanks for the details on that, Colin - I've not had to do a replacement mobo job recently (mostly because it tends to be cheaper to replace the machine than mess around).

    It's still worth backing up to external media before the move, though :)


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    Tuesday, June 26, 2012 2:11 PM
    Moderator
  • Oh I agree.  I had everything backed up on external eSata drives.  I never needed to use the backups but I had all my planning done to do that.  32bit Windows is another matter.  A switch between my MSI and Asus mobos using 32bit Windows would have involved repair installs because of the HALs.  But Microsoft solved that for 64bit Windows back in 2007.  The problem for most folks would arise from the inability to do a repair install with a recovery disk.

    By the way, my wife just bought a refurbed HP Omni 220-1150xt all-in-one and one thing I learned about the recovery disk creator program is that you can't use just any old dvds with it.  The HP program only recognizes 8x DVD-R single-sided or 8x DVD+R singled sided dvds.  It rejects the dozens of other types of DVDs.  No DLs, no RWs, no 16x, nothing.  The required dvds aren't all that easy to find and I wound up ordering from an eBay supplier.  And if anyone is curious as to why the Creator only permits one set of dvds (or one usb stick) it is because the Windows EULA that states that the user may make one copy of the software for backup purposes.  The OEMs have to enforce compliance with even that term in the EULA.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.

    Tuesday, June 26, 2012 2:46 PM
    Answerer