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  • Question

  • The status on my Home Server has recently changed from Healthy to Critical due to fewer than 5GB of space on the system drive, according to Home Server.

     

    The current drive configuration (according to Disk Management) is:

        System: 93.15GB Internal IDE

            20GB Sys (C) 78% Free

            73.15GB Data (D) 3% Free

        Data: 74.52GB Internal IDE 20% Free

        Data: 93.36GB External USB 21% Free

     

    Duplication is on for every folder except one, that holds 1.59GB of data.  I was hoping that when the storage was balanced last night that it would move files off of the data partition of the system drive, but that doesn't appear to be the case.

     

    Any thoughts as to why I've suddenly got no space on one drive while I have plenty on the others?

    Sunday, July 1, 2007 3:15 PM

Answers

  • Removing some backups will have almost no effect. Sorry. The backup architecture just doesn't work that way.

    Here's what I would try (it will probably take a couple of days, at least...):
    • Get two moderately large drives, say a couple of 320 GB units. You can get those for around $90 each right now, if I recall correctly.
    • Flag most backups for deletion, and run a backup cleanup. This might free a couple of GB, which you may need.
    • Turn on duplication for any shares that aren't on right now.
    • Add one drive to the storage pool and wait for WHS to finish balancing.
    • Add the second one and wait.
    • Remove (one at a time, waiting for storage to finish balancing each time) the two secondary drives you have now.
    What you should wind up with at the end of the day is two drives that contain all of your data and backups, and an empty (except for tombstones) primary. This is good for a couple of reasons. The immediate benefit is that your primary is now clear to be a landing zone again. The longer term benefit is that it will be easier to make the move to the RTM product when it's available in the system builder channel. You pull one of the secondary drives from your current WHS, attach it to the new one (but don't add it to the pool) and it's got a complete set of your files ready to copy to the shares on the new WHS. A variation on this is how I moved my data from CTP to RC1: I had two secondary drives, both of which were in the 300 GB range, I knew that all my data was duplicated, and so I knew that I could safely do this.
    Monday, July 2, 2007 2:41 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • I used to have limited space as you do....almost. But anyway, your set up looks normal to me. You have 20% or less on all drives and 3% on the system drive. I think the warning is normal. Even if WHS does move things around.  You are almost out of space for further duplication, so it's warning you.....

    Ken Warren or another MVP will swing by and give more info for you....
    Sunday, July 1, 2007 3:20 PM
  • Pretty simple, really. First, here's how WHS uses the drives:

    In a WHS with multiple drives, the D: partition is used for multiple purposes. First, it's used to store the "tombstones" that point to where your files actually live; that could be on any other drive in your WHS (except the C: partition). Second, it's used as a "landing zone" for files copied to your WHS; every file that you copy to WHS, no matter how many drives you add, will always be written to D: first. Third, it's used to store share duplicates, when WHS needs to. Fourth, it's used when every other drive in your system is full, to store actual files. Finally, backups may be stored on D: in some configurations.

    Now, with that, consider your situation. You don't give actual share sizes, so I can't break down the numbers for you, but you'll have some backups from client PCs on your network, which will be stored on one of the secondary DATA partitions (possibly more than one drive; WHS will break the database files up across multiple drives). You also have shares that are duplicated, and shares that are not duplicated. Shares that are not duplicated are stored only on a secondary drive. Shares that are duplicated are stored on two physical drives. So if we presume that your backups are using about 60 GB of space, you have about 140 GB of (almost entirely) duplicated shares, or about 70 GB without duplication. I can easily see WHS pushing some share duplication onto the primary data partition in this scenario. The smaller your backup storage database, the more likely it is that WHS has been forced to store duplication on the D: partition.

    Does that help?
    Sunday, July 1, 2007 4:38 PM
    Moderator
  • I think I get it now.

     

    It looks like I'll have to tweak the backup settings to not keep them for so long, because I don't have space for any more drives in my current Home Server box, and I don't want to add any more external drives.

     

    The breakdown of shares is as follows:

        Users: 7.52GB - Duplicated

        Music: 1.59 - Not Duplicated

        Photos:  5.12GB - Duplicated

        Public:  11.13GB - Duplicated

        Software:  345.58MB - Duplicated

        Videos:  4.12GB - Duplicated

        iTunes:  43.71GB - Duplicated

     

        Total:  74GB (72GB Duplication)

     

    Backups are another 44GB

     

    Total Size: 261.06GB

    Free Space: 51.93GB

     

    Think that changing backups to only keep a week's worth will make much of a difference?

    Sunday, July 1, 2007 6:26 PM
  • Yeah, you really need more secondary drive space! If your shares without duplication exceed your secondary drive......I would think there could be an opportunity for data loss should one of the drives fail.

     I had a 200 primary and an 80 gig secondary with a total of 145gig of files WITHOUT duplication. So 35% my stuff was on the primary and the other 65% was on the secondary. WHS was constantly in Balance mode too.

    I then just bit the bullet and bought two WD SE 16 meg cache 500 gig ATA hard drives. Now I have all my files on the secondary 500 gig HD. Like Ken said, when I turn on duplication the dups will live on the primary.

    If ya got the jack, buy some drives from newegg.com or zipzoomfly.com.  HD's are getting way cheap..... 500 gb drives are $99.00-$120.00 each
    Sunday, July 1, 2007 7:06 PM
  • I guess I could take one of the optical drives out and put in  a new hard drive, if my wife'll let me buy one.  Depends on how finances are going.

     

    I was hoping to save buying any more drives for when I build a new machine in preparation of the offical release version, since my current home server box is geared more towards being a media center box, hardware-wise.

     

    I guess if I get one gigantic drive now, I can add it to the storage pool of the new server after I've migrated all of my data over, since I plan on going for overkill on storage when I build the new server.

     

    If I bought a 500GB drive, I wonder if I could take the USB external drive out of the storage pool?

    Sunday, July 1, 2007 8:45 PM
  • Removing some backups will have almost no effect. Sorry. The backup architecture just doesn't work that way.

    Here's what I would try (it will probably take a couple of days, at least...):
    • Get two moderately large drives, say a couple of 320 GB units. You can get those for around $90 each right now, if I recall correctly.
    • Flag most backups for deletion, and run a backup cleanup. This might free a couple of GB, which you may need.
    • Turn on duplication for any shares that aren't on right now.
    • Add one drive to the storage pool and wait for WHS to finish balancing.
    • Add the second one and wait.
    • Remove (one at a time, waiting for storage to finish balancing each time) the two secondary drives you have now.
    What you should wind up with at the end of the day is two drives that contain all of your data and backups, and an empty (except for tombstones) primary. This is good for a couple of reasons. The immediate benefit is that your primary is now clear to be a landing zone again. The longer term benefit is that it will be easier to make the move to the RTM product when it's available in the system builder channel. You pull one of the secondary drives from your current WHS, attach it to the new one (but don't add it to the pool) and it's got a complete set of your files ready to copy to the shares on the new WHS. A variation on this is how I moved my data from CTP to RC1: I had two secondary drives, both of which were in the 300 GB range, I knew that all my data was duplicated, and so I knew that I could safely do this.
    Monday, July 2, 2007 2:41 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks!

     

    Now I just have to make sure I can afford a couple new drives in the budget

    Monday, July 2, 2007 3:01 AM