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Copy & Restore SyncToy .dat files RRS feed

  • Question

  • I used the original SyncToy version a while ago and have just installed and used 2.1 for the first time.
    My concern is more that I have a good copy and less the amount of time involved so I am using "Check File Contents". 

    I gather from another post that it is not possible to locate the SyncToy local settings files elsewhere and I presume that is where SyncToy keeps a record of the various file CRC/Hash data so I guess my only option is copying and restoring them when and where I need them.

    The problem is, a lot of the synching I do is with a computer that I often have to restore with different operating system partitions. I have several applications I use for demonstration, primarily video related, which don't get along very well and it is always best to run any of them on as clean an instal as possible so I have clean images which I restore when it is time to demo any specific program.

    If I do a synch between my two primary media discs and then restore the OS partition the local settings are gone.

    Will it work if I simply copy the local settings after a sync and restore them before I do anything again with SyncToy?


    Thanks, DP

    Monday, February 22, 2010 2:01 PM

Answers

  • With the way you mentioned(copy locall settings) the folder pairs info will be kept. But for the synced details info, in fact it saves at a .dat  locates at C:\Users\[user]\AppData\Local\Microsoft\SyncToy\2.0 with name as SyncToy_[GUID].dat. You can also copy them as a trick, but it is not public supported. As a trick it will work as most of the time, but I could not promise this.

    Thanks,
    Ping

    Technical Notes on SyncToy
    ......
    Technical note:The folder pair information is saved in a file named "SyncToyDirPairs.bin," (on Windows Vista: %LOCALAPPDATA%\Microsoft\SyncToy\2.0\SyncToyDirPairs.bin, on Windows XP: "%USERPROFILE%\Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\SyncToy\2.0\SyncToyDirPairs.bin").

    ......
    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
    • Proposed as answer by Ping Lu Monday, March 1, 2010 9:29 AM
    • Marked as answer by Deepa Choundappan Monday, March 1, 2010 8:08 PM
    Monday, March 1, 2010 9:29 AM