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Mainboard change after Heat issues on new PC. RRS feed

  • Question

  • On the 20th October 2007, I purchased a new computer from a company called “*****".

    Along with the PC, I purchased an OEM copy of Windows Vista product key: *****-*****-*****-*****-*****. From the moment the PC powered up I was plagued with heat issues that caused the PC to hang after around 5 minutes of use. The mainboard that was installed was an ASUS P5KSE which, since asking around, seemed to have produced a similar effect from some of my friends who had also bought new machines.

    *** ***** Computers were prepared to change the mainboard for another of the same type but were unprepared to allow an upgrade to a board more suited to heat generated by a Duo Core Quad processor.  Exasperated, I upgraded the board at considerable expense to a Gigabyte 6-Quad / S Series mainboard without the help of *** **** Computers, having lost faith in them, and the heat issues I encountered have been resolved.

    The following day I received a message from my PC asking that I reregister with Microsoft. I attempt to do so and am told that the Product Key from my copy of Vista is already in use. I called Microsoft this morning to be told that the mainboard of my PC is the component that is registered to the product key that I hold and there is nothing that can be done. The only resolution would be to go and buy a new copy of Vista.

    Having only had the PC in my possession for around 4 weeks, most of which was punctuated with system crashes, phone calls to various people and waiting around for new parts, I find that I have 2 days of use before having to go to further expense by purchasing a new copy of Vista.

    This of course would be unacceptable to any person with a sense of fair play. I also consider that whilst I type this letter of complaint the clock is ticking and in 2 days time, before I am likely to receive any acceptable solution to my problem from Microsoft, I will have an unusable machine sitting in my study.

    I understand that Microsoft needs to take every precaution these days to prevent theft of their software products, but in the case of a legitimate home user who has bought the software in good faith but can no longer use it after a very short length of time, I think that in the spirit of good customer relations some leeway could be granted and a new product key issued.

    I have spoken to Consumer Affairs and they have advised me to purchase a new copy of Windows Vista given the fact that in 2 days I will effectively have no PC, and they will attempt on my behalf to obtain a refund from Microsoft.

    I would be very interested in your reply however, please try not to include any software licensing regulations as this was explained to me again and again via “Arash”, Microsoft's call centre operative.

    MGAD report below.

     

    Diagnostic Report (1.7.0066.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    WGA Data-->
    Validation Status: Genuine
    Validation Code: 0
    Online Validation Code: 0x0
    Cached Validation Code: 0x0
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-QXHPX-QGQG4-TYYQ9
    Windows Product Key Hash: NH0k8MZlBw2NoBq9BJ7bXsPO/AM=
    Windows Product ID: 89578-OEM-7359731-09725
    Windows Product ID Type: 3
    Windows License Type: OEM System Builder
    Windows OS version: 6.0.6000.2.00010300.0.0.003
    CSVLK Server: N/A
    CSVLK PID: N/A
    ID: {179E188A-8E7F-4B4F-8D05-AE079B5184A8}(1)
    Is Admin: Yes
    TestCab: 0x0
    WGA Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Product Name: Windows Vista (TM) Home Premium
    Architecture: 0x00000000
    Build lab: 6000.vista_gdr.070828-1515
    TTS Error:
    Validation Diagnostic:
    Resolution Status: N/A

    Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A
    File Exists: No
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 103 Blocked VLK
    OGA Version: N/A, 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Office Diagnostics: FCEE394C-2989-80070002_025D1FF3-282-80041010_025D1FF3-170-80041010_025D1FF3-171-1_025D1FF3-434-80040154_025D1FF3-178-80040154_025D1FF3-179-2_025D1FF3-185-80070002_025D1FF3-199-3

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 7.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{179E188A-8E7F-4B4F-8D05-AE079B5184A8}</UGUID><Version>1.7.0066.0</Version><OS>6.0.6000.2.00010300.0.0.003</OS><Architecture>x32</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-TYYQ9</PKey><PID>89578-OEM-7359731-09725</PID><PIDType>3</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-1566986166-1645122840-2390893384</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>Gigabyte Technology Co., Ltd.</Manufacturer><Model>X38-DQ6</Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>Award Software International, Inc.</Manufacturer><Version>F4</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="4"/><Date>20070919000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>26323507018400FA</HWID><UserLCID>0C09</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Cen. Australia Standard Time(GMT+09:30)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM/><BRT/></MachineData><Software><Office><Result>103</Result><Products><Product GUID="{90120000-0030-0000-0000-0000000FF1CE}"><LegitResult>103</LegitResult><Name>Microsoft Office Enterprise 2007</Name><Ver>12</Ver><Val>ACD7202654E586</Val><Hash>fFic3JgCreGGRxyF8uMWB4R4Jcg=</Hash><Pid>89388-707-1528066-65423</Pid><PidType>14</PidType></Product></Products></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

    Spsys.log Content: 0x80070002

     

    Tuesday, November 27, 2007 2:36 AM

Answers

  • Generally, you may upgrade or replace all of the hardware components on your computer and the end user may maintain the license for the original Microsoft OEM operating system software, with the exception of an upgrade or replacement of the motherboard.

    An upgrade of the motherboard is considered to result in a "new personal computer" to which Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be transferred from another computer.

     

    The replacement motherboard must be the same make/model or the same manufacturer's replacement/equivalent, as defined by that manufacturer's warranty.


    Tuesday, November 27, 2007 3:35 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi Rach,

     

    yes I have the original disk and I installed the O/S when I got it home.

     

    Thanks for the official company stance Carey. If I'd have replaced the board with the same one then I'm pretty sure that the instability issues would have remained despite me adding some heavy duty cooling solutions.

     

     I didn't change the board 12 months down the track because I wanted to improve performance. I changed it within 3 weeks of a new purchase because the damn thing wouldn't work with the original board. As previously posted, I can understand MS wanting to safeguard it's software, but when it takes partial ownership of my PC i.e telling me I can't use my new mainboard, but I can use the one that doesn't work; an individual instance such as this should be judged on it's own merits.

     

    Customer satisfaction appears to have evaporated from MS policies in their attempt to prevent software piracy. True, I paid a reduced premium for the OEM version of Vista but that was my right as offered as part of the PC package.

     

    If computer systems were stable electrical items then you can write policies in stone. Unfortunately, they're not and instancies will arise when legitimate users are stuffed through no fault of their own whilst trying to seek resolution to their problem.

     

    regards,

    Tuesday, November 27, 2007 4:01 AM
  • Err.. yeah. Thanks for the advise. I am to take my perfectly working machine with my 4 week old copy of vista back to the shop and ask for a refund. As previously explained, they were only prepared to replace the mainboard with the same mainboard. This would provide no resolution to my issue.

     

    Look it's very easy to go round in circles on this subject, but the bottom line is that MS has policies in place to protect their interests and discourage piracy. Fine. But when those policies screw the end user who has BOUGHT the software then there is something very wrong. The validation process is inconvenient and cumbersome, and it creates a very strong impression in my mind that Microsoft doesn't really want me to use the software i've paid for... until i've paid for it twice.

     

    The whole thing goes well beyond common sense. I wish I could gain resolution to the issue but the help desk was like talking to a stuck record - perpetually quoting the end user licence agreement in an accent I could bearly understand, and there are no listings for calling anyone of seniority who maybe able to address my plight.

     

    In fact, I seem to be spending the final 24 hours before my PCs demise reading and writing stuff on here.

     

     

    Fabulous.

     

    (Just wondering how people who have computing as a hobby manage. Anyone upgrading and having fun with their PC in this way is in for a bit of a shock doncha think?)

    Tuesday, November 27, 2007 8:32 AM
  • Hi lordflasheart,

     

      OK, If I understand the issue, I would say that in your situation, the Microsoft person, that you talk to, was incorrect. 

    If a computer is bought with Vista pre-installed, and then the user changes out the motherboard, then you can not continue to use the same Vista license, but if the "computer builder" was the one to change out the motherboard, then you Can continue to use the same Vista license.

     

      So, in your situation, it soulds like you bought the computer and the Vista software seperatly and installed Vista on the computer, yourself. In that case, you are now seen as the "Computer Builder" and since you (the computer builder) changed out the motherboard, you CAN continue to use the same Vista license.

     

    I suggest that you follow the below steps to re-activate you copy of Vista:

    1) Click the Start button
    2) Type: slui.exe 4 and hit the 'Enter' key
    3) Select the area that you are located in.
    4) Follow the steps provided by Activation Wizard

     

    NOTE: The key to this process is that you need to talk to a Live Activation Rep! When you first call, you will be interacting with an Automated Voice, either select the option to talk to a Live Rep or if there is no option, do not enter any numbers. This should force the automated voice to tansfer you to a Live Rep. I Highly suggest that you DO NOT mention that you changed out your motherboad, it will only confuse the Rep. Just say you need to Re-activate because you changed out some "hardware" in your computer.

     

    Thank you,

    Darin Smith

    WGA Forum Manager

     

    Wednesday, November 28, 2007 12:45 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

     

    Sounds a little harsh to be fair. I take it you got a disk and the operating system wasn't pre-installed?

     

     

    Tuesday, November 27, 2007 3:30 AM
  • Generally, you may upgrade or replace all of the hardware components on your computer and the end user may maintain the license for the original Microsoft OEM operating system software, with the exception of an upgrade or replacement of the motherboard.

    An upgrade of the motherboard is considered to result in a "new personal computer" to which Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be transferred from another computer.

     

    The replacement motherboard must be the same make/model or the same manufacturer's replacement/equivalent, as defined by that manufacturer's warranty.


    Tuesday, November 27, 2007 3:35 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi Rach,

     

    yes I have the original disk and I installed the O/S when I got it home.

     

    Thanks for the official company stance Carey. If I'd have replaced the board with the same one then I'm pretty sure that the instability issues would have remained despite me adding some heavy duty cooling solutions.

     

     I didn't change the board 12 months down the track because I wanted to improve performance. I changed it within 3 weeks of a new purchase because the damn thing wouldn't work with the original board. As previously posted, I can understand MS wanting to safeguard it's software, but when it takes partial ownership of my PC i.e telling me I can't use my new mainboard, but I can use the one that doesn't work; an individual instance such as this should be judged on it's own merits.

     

    Customer satisfaction appears to have evaporated from MS policies in their attempt to prevent software piracy. True, I paid a reduced premium for the OEM version of Vista but that was my right as offered as part of the PC package.

     

    If computer systems were stable electrical items then you can write policies in stone. Unfortunately, they're not and instancies will arise when legitimate users are stuffed through no fault of their own whilst trying to seek resolution to their problem.

     

    regards,

    Tuesday, November 27, 2007 4:01 AM
  • You should contact the seller and insist on a warranty replacement or demand a complete refund.

     

    Tuesday, November 27, 2007 4:17 AM
    Moderator
  • Err.. yeah. Thanks for the advise. I am to take my perfectly working machine with my 4 week old copy of vista back to the shop and ask for a refund. As previously explained, they were only prepared to replace the mainboard with the same mainboard. This would provide no resolution to my issue.

     

    Look it's very easy to go round in circles on this subject, but the bottom line is that MS has policies in place to protect their interests and discourage piracy. Fine. But when those policies screw the end user who has BOUGHT the software then there is something very wrong. The validation process is inconvenient and cumbersome, and it creates a very strong impression in my mind that Microsoft doesn't really want me to use the software i've paid for... until i've paid for it twice.

     

    The whole thing goes well beyond common sense. I wish I could gain resolution to the issue but the help desk was like talking to a stuck record - perpetually quoting the end user licence agreement in an accent I could bearly understand, and there are no listings for calling anyone of seniority who maybe able to address my plight.

     

    In fact, I seem to be spending the final 24 hours before my PCs demise reading and writing stuff on here.

     

     

    Fabulous.

     

    (Just wondering how people who have computing as a hobby manage. Anyone upgrading and having fun with their PC in this way is in for a bit of a shock doncha think?)

    Tuesday, November 27, 2007 8:32 AM
  • Hi lordflasheart,

     

      OK, If I understand the issue, I would say that in your situation, the Microsoft person, that you talk to, was incorrect. 

    If a computer is bought with Vista pre-installed, and then the user changes out the motherboard, then you can not continue to use the same Vista license, but if the "computer builder" was the one to change out the motherboard, then you Can continue to use the same Vista license.

     

      So, in your situation, it soulds like you bought the computer and the Vista software seperatly and installed Vista on the computer, yourself. In that case, you are now seen as the "Computer Builder" and since you (the computer builder) changed out the motherboard, you CAN continue to use the same Vista license.

     

    I suggest that you follow the below steps to re-activate you copy of Vista:

    1) Click the Start button
    2) Type: slui.exe 4 and hit the 'Enter' key
    3) Select the area that you are located in.
    4) Follow the steps provided by Activation Wizard

     

    NOTE: The key to this process is that you need to talk to a Live Activation Rep! When you first call, you will be interacting with an Automated Voice, either select the option to talk to a Live Rep or if there is no option, do not enter any numbers. This should force the automated voice to tansfer you to a Live Rep. I Highly suggest that you DO NOT mention that you changed out your motherboad, it will only confuse the Rep. Just say you need to Re-activate because you changed out some "hardware" in your computer.

     

    Thank you,

    Darin Smith

    WGA Forum Manager

     

    Wednesday, November 28, 2007 12:45 AM
  •  Darin Smith MS wrote:

     

      So, in your situation, it soulds like you bought the computer and the Vista software seperatly and installed Vista on the computer, yourself. In that case, you are now seen as the "Computer Builder" and since you (the computer builder) changed out the motherboard, you CAN continue to use the same Vista license.

     

    And even if you did not buy them separately, the consensus here is that this situation is not a good customer experience and that you should be able to re-activate you current copy of Vista on the new motherboard system.

     

    Darin

    Wednesday, November 28, 2007 12:53 AM
  • Thank you Darin. I'm very appreciative.

     

    Wednesday, November 28, 2007 3:03 AM