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WGA program needs to be overhauled RRS feed

  • Question

  • After making a contribution to your forum, I decided to run legitchk on my own Fujitsu Siemens laptop. The result was GENUINE.

    Next I ran the Magical Jellybean KeyFinder and it gave a different key than the one on my COA label underside.

    Now I purchased this unit through the store I then worked for. I personally ordered the computer through the wholesaler, so it was never a corporate system and was brand new when we received it. When I left the company I purchased the laptop, so it has never had other owners. It arrived with all the original software preinstalled.

    Now I ran KeyUpdate Tool to enter the key from the attached COA label, it  gave a grey dialog box "The product key entered is not a valid key for this system. Please check it for typing errors and try again" which of course I did again and again. .

    Next I ran MGA and it reports it as genuine.

    What's up Microsoft?

    Friday, November 24, 2006 6:02 PM

Answers

  •  cdisxm wrote:

    Thank you for the friendly reply. Of course I understand the different process whereby the larger manufacturers' keys don't always match. But this raises even more unanswered questions and goes to show that Microsoft have even more work ahead of them to solve their festering old problem of piracy, which could have been eliminated before it began.

    Thanks for your feedback. We have other methods in place to prevent piracy of OEM licenses, no need to worry :).

     

    The OEM and Volume Licenses specific for distribution via larger enterprises differ depending on use.

     

    Volume Licenses are for company distribution and business use only. Where as OEM SLP (System Lock preinstallation) is much like Volume, however, its specifically used and distributed via OEM's to consumers in order to make recovery and imaging easier for the OEM.

     

    Since individual consumers do own and purchase a genuine license with a PC purchase - then OEM's also attach the COA sticker on the bottom of the PC. These COA's are usually not used as most consumers don't need to change off of their OEM factory installation.


    Microsoft have only told the customer their COA has to match the key and here is a tool to modify it if it is an original, why haven't they published a list of computers that are exceptions to this rule?

    This is not needed for the normal consumer. The Tool is primarily for users who are using non-genuine licenses and have a COA sticker on the bottom of their PC. Because larger OEM's cannot and should not readily distribute their OEM SLP product keys - its very specific and only used in the manufacturing process ONLY.


    Why wouldn't Microsoft make certain brand name PC manufacturers' support centers aware of this and advise the customer base so to save both the manufacturer and Microsoft unnecessary support expenses, because validation and matching of keys does not apply to them, instead of letting them work it out for themselves the hard way? (Microsoft could actually make money by saving what they would have spent on giving the support).

    They are fully aware. As well, we have readily linked this on our non-genuine validation pages so users can compare the product keys currently in use on their system.


    Can you honestly say a regular user of a Toshiba or Sony that their COA does not have to match the key?

    Yes, as described above.


    And why should a customer have to restore Windows just because Microsoft decides they want to check if you are a software pirate or not?

    Many times users have non-genuine installations and need to revert back to their OEM installation. Many times non-genuine installations have viruses and open-holes established due to the counterfeit software (http://www.microsoft.com/genuine/downloads/FailureScenarios.aspx).


    Finally, why would Microsoft even waste their time with a major brand PC that was only ever shipped with original pre-installed Windows? It must be genuine because its a Sony for example.

    See http://www.microsoft.com/genuine/downloads/FailureScenarios.aspx

     

     

    -Phil Liu

    Program Manager, Genuine Advantage

    Friday, December 1, 2006 9:23 PM

All replies

  • Please follow this diagnostic troubleshooting procedure:

    1. Download and run the MGA Diagnostic Tool: 

    http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012    

    2. After running the MGA Diagnostic Tool, click
        on the "Windows" tab and then click on "Copy".

    3. Next, visit the following website and create a post in the
        "WGA Validation Problems" forum and paste the
        results of the WGA Diagnostic Data in a detailed post.
       
    http://forums.microsoft.com/Genuine/default.aspx?SiteID=25

    4. A WGA troubleshooting specialist will analyze the data and
        recommend an appropriate solution.

    Friday, November 24, 2006 6:11 PM
    Moderator
  • Od course i already said I ran MGA Diagnostic and it returned "Genuine" status.

    We are already in a forum called "Windows Validation Issues", so I am posting it here as follows:

    Diagnostic Report (1.5.0717.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    WGA Data-->
    Validation Status: Genuine
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-8DR2H-RBCX6-9HR23
    Windows Product Key Hash: AhLZ50FiGIAYv8mzGPQYadOviJo=
    Windows Product ID: 55277-OEM-2111907-00117
    Windows Product ID Type: 2
    Windows License Type: OEM SLP
    Windows OS version: 5.1.2600.2.00010300.2.0.hom
    ID: 793b1b13-6c53-48b6-b6a8-8ab4e93fb1f8
    Is Admin: Yes
    AutoDial: No
    Registry: 0x0
    WGA Version: Registered, 1.5.716.0
    Signed By: Microsoft
    Validation Diagnostic:
    Resolution Status: N/A

    System Scan Data-->
    Scan: Complete
    Cryptography: Complete

    Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: 0
    File Exists: Yes
    Version: 1.5.540.0
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: Microsoft
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: Microsoft

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 109
    Office Diagnostics: B4D0AA8B-530-645

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 7.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\PROGRA~1\MOZILLA.ORG\SEAMON~1\SEAMON~1.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>793b1b13-6c53-48b6-b6a8-8ab4e93fb1f8</UGUID><Version>1.5.0717.0</Version><OS>5.1.2600.2.00010300.2.0.hom</OS><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-9HR23</PKey><PID>55277-OEM-2111907-00117</PID><PIDType>2</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-1606980848-492894223-1060284298</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>FUJITSU SIEMENS</Manufacturer><Model>AMILO M        </Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>Phoenix Technologies LTD</Manufacturer><Version>R01-S0N   </Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="31"/><Date>20030829000000.000000+000</Date><SLPBIOS> FUJITSU SIEMENS, FSC SYSTEM, FSC SERVER, FUJITSU SIEMENS</SLPBIOS></BIOS><HWID>B34B3507018400DC</HWID><UserLCID>2409</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Atlantic Standard Time(GMT-04:00)</TimeZone><SBID><stat>2</stat><msppid></msppid><name>xxxxxxxxxxxxx</name><model>Amilo M-7400</model></SBID></MachineData>   <Software><Office><Result>109</Result><Products/></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

    Looks like a lot of info there. I xxxxx'd out the compnay name for security reasons and that I am posting it on a public board.

     

    THANK YOU

     

    CDISXM

     

     

    Friday, November 24, 2006 7:40 PM
  • According to your MGA Diagnostic log, your installation of Windows XP is indeed genuine.

    Please go to www.microsoft.com/genuine and click Validate Windows - that should resync the WGA Validation files.

    Afterward, please click Start, then Run, then type in "WGAtray.exe /b" and click OK, then reboot. That should fix it!

     

    Friday, November 24, 2006 7:45 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi,

    "After making a contribution to your forum, I decided to run legitchk on my own Fujitsu Siemens laptop. The result was GENUINE.

    Next I ran the Magical Jellybean KeyFinder and it gave a different key than the one on my COA label underside."

    For OEM systems from larger manufacturers this is not uncommon. The key used to install Windows XP may NOT match the key on the sticker.

    Larger OEM's install XP in a different way to smaller stores or home users and this difference is a by product of that process. The key and copy of XP you have may be a locked to the specific system using other means called System Locked Preinstallation.

    If you lose the restore disks which came with the PC then you may be able to use a normal Windows XP OEM install CD and the key on the sticker to rebuild your PC.

    If you system passed as genuine then do not alter or change anything.

    Kind Regards

    Simon

     

     

     

    Thursday, November 30, 2006 9:53 PM
  • Simon,

    Thank you for the friendly reply. Of course I understand the different process whereby the larger manufacturers' keys don't always match. But this raises even more unanswered questions and goes to show that Microsoft have even more work ahead of them to solve their festering old problem of piracy, which could have been eliminated before it began.

    Microsoft have only told the customer their COA has to match the key and here is a tool to modify it if it is an original, why haven't they published a list of computers that are exceptions to this rule?

    Why wouldn't Microsoft make certain brand name PC manufacturers' support centers aware of this and advise the customer base so to save both the manufacturer and Microsoft unnecessary support expenses, because validation and matching of keys does not apply to them, instead of letting them work it out for themselves the hard way? (Microsoft could actually make money by saving what they would have spent on giving the support).

    Can you honestly say a regular user of a Toshiba or Sony that their COA does not have to match the key?

    And why should a customer have to restore Windows just because Microsoft decides they want to check if you are a software pirate or not?

    And remember some manufacturers with older PCs do not give you the option to just restore or repair Windows, but simply transfer a fresh image, which means they stand to lose their data becasue Microsoft made it necessary start with a clean system.

    Finally, why would Microsoft even waste their time with a major brand PC that was only ever shipped with original pre-installed Windows? It must be genuine because its a Sony for example.

    Nowhere in your documentation do you list exceptions to the COA matching the key.

    Even if the IT department just cheated on the COA matching because they did not anticipate Microsoft would dream up this validation nightmare, the top brand PC manufacturer paid their fee to Microsoft, so who cares. They should automatically exclude those PCs from the Microsoft validation process and just let them have updates.

    I suspect that this laissez-faire approach to letting users run pirate duplicate key systems from the beginning was a misdirected way of ensuring Microsoft became the biggest (even if many were pirated) because Microsoft was the name on everyones' lips---and that's all that mattered. Now Microsoft have the unenviable task of correcting those mistakes from the past and doing so in such a way that the support costs to not outweight the new revenue stream from converting the counterfeit copies.

    Now I would really like to hear what some of Microsoft's senior executives have to say about these issues I have raised.

    Thank you.

    CDISXM

    Friday, December 1, 2006 8:30 PM
  •  cdisxm wrote:

    Thank you for the friendly reply. Of course I understand the different process whereby the larger manufacturers' keys don't always match. But this raises even more unanswered questions and goes to show that Microsoft have even more work ahead of them to solve their festering old problem of piracy, which could have been eliminated before it began.

    Thanks for your feedback. We have other methods in place to prevent piracy of OEM licenses, no need to worry :).

     

    The OEM and Volume Licenses specific for distribution via larger enterprises differ depending on use.

     

    Volume Licenses are for company distribution and business use only. Where as OEM SLP (System Lock preinstallation) is much like Volume, however, its specifically used and distributed via OEM's to consumers in order to make recovery and imaging easier for the OEM.

     

    Since individual consumers do own and purchase a genuine license with a PC purchase - then OEM's also attach the COA sticker on the bottom of the PC. These COA's are usually not used as most consumers don't need to change off of their OEM factory installation.


    Microsoft have only told the customer their COA has to match the key and here is a tool to modify it if it is an original, why haven't they published a list of computers that are exceptions to this rule?

    This is not needed for the normal consumer. The Tool is primarily for users who are using non-genuine licenses and have a COA sticker on the bottom of their PC. Because larger OEM's cannot and should not readily distribute their OEM SLP product keys - its very specific and only used in the manufacturing process ONLY.


    Why wouldn't Microsoft make certain brand name PC manufacturers' support centers aware of this and advise the customer base so to save both the manufacturer and Microsoft unnecessary support expenses, because validation and matching of keys does not apply to them, instead of letting them work it out for themselves the hard way? (Microsoft could actually make money by saving what they would have spent on giving the support).

    They are fully aware. As well, we have readily linked this on our non-genuine validation pages so users can compare the product keys currently in use on their system.


    Can you honestly say a regular user of a Toshiba or Sony that their COA does not have to match the key?

    Yes, as described above.


    And why should a customer have to restore Windows just because Microsoft decides they want to check if you are a software pirate or not?

    Many times users have non-genuine installations and need to revert back to their OEM installation. Many times non-genuine installations have viruses and open-holes established due to the counterfeit software (http://www.microsoft.com/genuine/downloads/FailureScenarios.aspx).


    Finally, why would Microsoft even waste their time with a major brand PC that was only ever shipped with original pre-installed Windows? It must be genuine because its a Sony for example.

    See http://www.microsoft.com/genuine/downloads/FailureScenarios.aspx

     

     

    -Phil Liu

    Program Manager, Genuine Advantage

    Friday, December 1, 2006 9:23 PM