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Downloading From WHS RRS feed

  • Question

  • How man users can download files from WHS concurrently?

    Thursday, February 11, 2010 10:34 PM

Answers

  • As I said, for in-depth assistance with media types, ripping/converting, etc., The Green Button is a much better resource than this forum.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by JSHollis Saturday, February 13, 2010 4:23 PM
    Friday, February 12, 2010 12:40 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Either 10, or unlimited. :) Connections to shares are limited, but connections to the remote access web site aren't. In practical terms, though, I expect nobody would get good performance out of your typical home broadband connection if more than 2-3 people were downloading heavily via remote access at the same time.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Proposed as answer by Al West Friday, February 12, 2010 12:06 AM
    Thursday, February 11, 2010 10:48 PM
    Moderator
  • I put .avi video files into a public folder.  I built a web page where the avi files are individual links.  The user either clicks to play them or can "save target as".  Are users limited in this way? 
    Thursday, February 11, 2010 10:55 PM
  • Not as far as I know.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Thursday, February 11, 2010 11:14 PM
    Moderator
  • People are always having trouble opening anything I have on my server.  I have several AVI files which are on a web page and noone could open them.

    One stated this after clicking a link.

    "It would open Windows Media but not connect to anything.
    Sometimes it would say loading media but then nothing appeared.  Other
    times it said Windows Media not responding."

    Itwould appear my upload speed is slow.  Agreed?

    • Edited by JSHollis Friday, February 12, 2010 1:02 AM
    Friday, February 12, 2010 12:28 AM
  • If you go to http://www.speedtest.net/  what upload speed do you get?

    Now take your AVI file and work out it's average bit rate - sometimes you can get this by right-clicking on the file and selecting properties and it may tell you the PIN info.  Or divide the size of the file in MegaBytes  by the length of the movie in seconds - this will give you the Megabyte rate, multiply by 8 to get the Megabit rate.  What are the numbers?  My guess is your broadband connection cannot support streaming the files you have.

    You could consider transcoding the file to a codec using a lower bit rate. 

    If I confused you with the mate just post back your results from http://www.speedtest.net/ the size of the file and the length - if I'm teaching you to suck eggs then apologies in retrospect ;-)

    Cheers,
    Al
    --
    Friday, February 12, 2010 12:45 AM
  • What can you tell by this?


    Here is the results from the speed test: http://prntscr.com/3nwj

    Here are the sizes of the files: http://prntscr.com/3nvj



    I actually did a speed test via AT&T and these were the results: http://prntscr.com/3nxm
    Friday, February 12, 2010 1:19 AM
  • Yes your upload speed is 274kbps which isn't fast enough to stream half decent audio let alone video.

    Basically you internet connection upload speed is not good enough to stream video.  You would need to look at converting the video files - by the looks of it they are straight from a digital camera/camcorder and as they stand would be too high bandwidth for anyone to stream including TV broadcasters! 

    Your friends/family could right click on the links and select save as...  but they will be waiting for at least 7 minutes for the smallest file - maybe you should look into uploading to the popular site youtube or the HD equivilant vimeo.

    Windows movie make will also convert video for you but isn't available in newer versions of Windows I think.
    --
    Friday, February 12, 2010 1:39 AM
  • What's the best file type to convert to? I've got tools to do it with.
    Friday, February 12, 2010 1:41 AM
  • You should tell them to download the files and play them locally; your bandwidth isn't even really suitable for standard definition TV video. The rule of thumb is generally that you need 500 kbps+ to stream DVD quality over the internet.

    As for "the best file type", there isn't one. Really. The file type you want to convert to will depend almost entirely on what you want to do with the file, so what's best for me (local viewing of HD video over gigabit Ethernet) is not going to be best for you.

    For more directed help with media conversion, etc. you might want to visit The Green Button , a forum dedicated to Windows Media Center and media on Windows in general.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Friday, February 12, 2010 3:09 AM
    Moderator
  • Is there a file type worth converting to to make them easier to download for others? I have AT&T's Elite service and use Gigabit between my WHS and my PC.  
    Friday, February 12, 2010 3:42 AM
  • As I said, for in-depth assistance with media types, ripping/converting, etc., The Green Button is a much better resource than this forum.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by JSHollis Saturday, February 13, 2010 4:23 PM
    Friday, February 12, 2010 12:40 PM
    Moderator