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Web Designing. RRS feed

  • Question

  • Guys I want to learn about HTML and Web Designing...
    I m sure their are many others who want to study about it..
    So please start posting your Queries and solutions to others queries here...

    This is how we will go.. 1st Lets start of with the basics..
    Please start explaining the basics of the Web designing here..
    People will ask questions to it...
    The one explaining things here can also have quiz and questions asked here.. I will mark every legible post here which helps in learning...

    Lets make this the centre for learning the Web Designing art...
    Sunday, April 15, 2007 8:23 PM

Answers

  • Web designing is the are of designing website. In this, you can use combination of multiple scripting languages, unlike traditional programming languages.

    Moreover, the languages are called scripting languages because they are used to script a page of information.

    The most basic scripting language is HTML, which stands for Hyper-Text Markup Language. This language is interpreted by all the web-browsers.

    All the pages that we request on internet are converted into HTML, when they arrive at client side. The client side scripts may remain as it is. Client side scripts are written in JavaScript / VBScript.
    Sunday, April 15, 2007 8:27 PM
  • Start with the basics man. scripting and all are too high words to digest at this moment...
    Can you tell me how the coding for webs are done and how do they work...
    It is said that you dont need a compiler for web designing.. a notepad is enough...

    Also about the domains and how to register the site and all
    Sunday, April 15, 2007 8:35 PM
  • Ok Varun, I'm starting with something easy.

    I've already explained the meaning of scripting. So it should not be difficult for you to understand it.

    Now, regarding coding for webs, they are done in scripting languages. To create web pages / sites, you write those pages using combination of languages. Scripting languages permit your pages either to be dynamic or static.

    Static pages means those pages whose contents do not change over a period of time. Moreover, they represent constant information. e.g., check out

    http://mail.google.com/mail/help/terms_of_use.html

    That's a static page. Generally, the file extension of static pages is .htm / .html.

    Regarding dynamic pages, they are those pages which change frequently and the same page behaves differently for different values. For this, consider this forums site. Check out the address bar. For each new thread, only the PostID changes, and other values, more or less, remain same.


    Dynamic pages can have extension from a wide range of list. The extension generally depends of the language in which the page has been built.

    e.g.
    1. ASPX = ASP.NET Pages
    2. PHP = HyperText Pre Processor
    3. JSP = Java Server Pages
    4. CFM = Cold-Fusion Pages
    5. etc....
    Monday, April 16, 2007 5:01 AM
  • You can use Notepad as a general editor for all the web-pages. But for each language, there are different editors available in the market right now.

    e.g.
    1. MS Front Page = creating simple HTML Pages
    2. Visual Interdev = creating traditional ASP Pages
    3. MS Visual Web Developer = ASP.NET Pages Editor
    4. Dreamweaver = provides support for creating web-pages in multiple languages.
    5. and lot others to list.
    Monday, April 16, 2007 5:04 AM
  • Domains are the names allocated to a network that provide some services.

    e.g. microsoft.com is a domain that provides information and services pertaining to products of microsoft.

    For getting a domain registered, you need to contact domain registrar. There are many domain registrars available right now.

    e.g. Rediff, IndiaTimes, Web4India and lot many.

    On domains, you host your website. The websites can be hosted either on the server space or at your own place. If you opt for hosting your website on the server space, than for that, you need to pay money / rental to them. If you decide to host website at your own place, they you must have powerful high-end servers and a high bandwidth Internet Connection with static IP support.

    Here, the static IPs means those IP Addresses that do not change. Each website is mapped to a unique IP Address. Mostly, whenever you connect to Internet from home, you are allocated dynamic IP Address that changes each time you log on.
    Monday, April 16, 2007 5:12 AM
  • Thankz a lot man.. this is some piece of information... I didnt knew a lot of it..

    Start with the basic html coding then..
    Monday, April 16, 2007 3:48 PM
  • Hey Varun, here goes a sample very basic coding for the HTML. Copy the code and paste it into Notepad. Save it with some file name and with extension .HTM. Double Click this file and see the output in browser.

    Code Snippet

    <HTML>

        <HEAD>

           <TITLE>

              Welcome to HTML : See the Title Bar

           </TITLE>

        </HEAD>

         <BODY>
             This is the text.
              <B>Bold</B>
                <BR>
              This is after line break.
              <B><U><I> Check Text. It will be in Bold, Underline, Italics.
              </I></U></B>
        </BODY>
    </HTML>

    Monday, April 16, 2007 4:47 PM
  • Perfect example for beginners, sanket.
    Tuesday, April 17, 2007 1:17 AM
  • Looks like Sanket is going to teach us higher ends of the Web designing.. I found some stuff on Basics, which will cover a very ground level introduction to web-pages and websites...
    After that I think Sanket will also get a ground to teach us the actual designing...
    So here it goes...
    Tuesday, April 17, 2007 7:47 PM
  •  

    In this 'hands-on' module we will be building our first web page in no time. We just need to quickly cover a couple of points beforehand to help get our feet on the ground.

    The three ways you can build a web page

    1. Use a pre-made template: WHAT IS A WEB DESIGN TEMPLATE?

    A web site design template is a pre-made web designs which can be customized to reflect your company's branding. Website design templates can be found in various formats like Photoshop and HTML. Many times, these templates are compatible with HTML editors like GoLive, FrontPage, and Dreamweaver.

    Web site templates can be very useful; they can be used by experienced web designers to 'jump-start' the creation of a website. They are also a way for people to put out great looking web sites quickly with little or no knowledge of HTML and web design.

    2. Use an HTML editor like FrontPage or Dreamweaver:

    HTML editors make building web pages feel like (to a certain extent) creating a document in Microsoft Word ... it's made pretty easy. But the downside is that you lose a certain amount of control of what you're doing and in some cases become dependent on the program.

    3. Hand-code your HTML in a text editor like Notepad:

    That means you type in the HTML code yourself. This is the approach we are going to use here, because it's the quickest way to learn how to build web pages, and it is arguably the best way because you have the most control over what you're doing.

    Ok, now that we know the advantages of hand-coding web pages, let's jump into just the bare minimum of theory, then we will build our first web page!


    What are HTML tags?

    HTML tags are specifically formatted text that creates 'markers' for web browser to read and interpret. These 'markers' tell the web browser what and how to display things on the web page. Tags are placed in and around text and images (text and images are some of the 'things') that your want to have appear in your web pages.

    HTML has a whole bunch of tags (just like the alphabet has a whole bunch of letters) that the web designer can use to build web pages. As mentioned above, tags have a specific structure so that when the browser is reading an HTML page, it knows the tags from the normal text.

    Tags are typically words or abbreviations of words placed between angled brackets. So for example: to make text bold, HTML has the 'bold' tag that looks like this:

    <b> This text will be bolded </b>

    Another commonly used tag is the paragraph tag:

    <p>

    This is a paragraph of text.

    </p>

     

    Tuesday, April 17, 2007 7:51 PM
  •  

    Tag Diagram:

    You may have noticed that HTML tags come in pairs; HTML has both an opening tag (<tag name>) and a closing tag (</tag name >). The only difference between the opening and closing tags is that the closing tag contains an extra forward slash.

    some EXAMPLE HTML tags that might make things more clear:

    <b> Make text bold</b>

    <i> Makes text italic </i>

    <h1> Tells the browser that this text is very important - the browser usually makes this text really big </h1>

    <table> Creates an HTML table - think of a spreadsheet </table>

    I hope you can see the pattern in the list above.

    HTML tags are not just for placing and formatting text, HTML tags can be used to include other things like: animation, video, Flash, audio, and even multimedia programs.


    Comparing HTML code and the web page it creates

    Let's start with a very simple web page to make it as easy for you to understand. First lets look at the final page: sample web page

    Now that we've seen what the page looks like, let's look at the HTML code used to create the page.

    What you should do now is take a little time and compare the HTML page and the page with the code that is used to create the page. Notice where the tags are and what they are doing.

    SOME theory: the structure of an HTML page

    An HTML page is divided into two major sections:

    1. The body

    The body (<body>) section: this section contains all the stuff that appears on the actual web page when someone happens to come along with their web browser. We are talking about the actual text, images, flash movies, and so on that people will see. That, of course, means the tags used to format all this stuff are there too...

    2. The head

    The head (<head>) section contains underlying information about the page which does not get displayed in the web page (except for the title of the page). It does, however, have an affect on how the web page is displayed.

    You will notice that both the head and the body sections of a web site are marked in the HTML page with their respective tags: (<head> </head>) and (<body> </body>).

    If the body tag creates the body of an HTML page, and the head tag creates the head of an HTML page, how do you create an HTML page itself? You guessed it, use the HTML tags:

    <html> </html>

    The 'mother of all tags' is the HTML (<html>) tag, and like all tags it must have a start tag (<html>) and an end tag (</html>). The difference between the start and end tags is the forward slash (/), but you already knew that .

    Every web page MUST begin and end with the HTML tag, otherwise the web browser (programs like Internet Explorer) will not be able to display the page. You also have to have the head tags and the body tags. All the other tags are optional.

    So the bare-bones HTML page must have these tags and in this order:

    <html>

    <head>

    <title>Title of your page</title>

    </head>

    <body>

    </body>

    </html>

     

    Tuesday, April 17, 2007 7:57 PM
  • Time to build your first HTML page by hand

    I could go on with more theory and send half of you to sleep (trust me); instead you are now going to actually build your very first web page! One of the best ways to learn something is to actually do it, so don't worry if things are a little foggy for you right now, as we build the web page, things will start to clear up.

     

    Step 1: let's write some HTML code

    Open up a text editor like Notepad on Windows or SimpleText on the Macintosh and type this in:

    <html>

    <head>

    <title>Your first hand coded page!</title>

    </head>

    <body>

    <h2>Hand coding web pages is easy! </h2>

    <p>

    I would like to thank everyone who helped me type this page.

    </p>

    </body>

    </html>

    Step 2: save the file as an HTML document

    Save your HTML file (save it to your desktop so you will be sure to find it!) using your text editor's 'Save as' function and name the file webPage.html. You can choose any name you want, as long as you follow these 3 rules:

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->1.  <!--[endif]-->Web page names cannot have spaces in them: 'web page.html' is no good but 'webPage.html' is perfecto.

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->2.  <!--[endif]-->The name has to end with either .html or .htm; by ending the file name this way you are telling the computer that this is a web page and that it should use a web page reader / browser to view it.

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->3.  <!--[endif]-->Don't use funny symbol like: $, %, ^, & in your page names. Stick to standard letters and numbers.

    Step 3: Marvel at your work and view your page

    You should be able to now just double-click on the page or open it up with your web browser by going to its "File" menu, then select "Open file" and select your page.

    You should be able to see your page in all its glory! Ok, not too much glory, but it was your first hand-coded page after all! If you don't see anything, then compare what you typed with the original I gave you and just go over the process again. You will get it if you give yourself a chance!

    If you're not sure if what you created is looking like it's supposed to, you can check out the final page here and compare it with your own.

    Conclusion

    Now that we've built our first web page, we can now move on to building our first web site.

     

    Tuesday, April 17, 2007 8:01 PM
  • Now i have got lots of data on this.. let me know if all of you want me to post more.. Than we can disscuss out things over here....
    Tuesday, April 17, 2007 8:06 PM
  • dear SAnket your post is definitely all right but i think DOMAIN is reffered to as

    .com, .net, .edu etc and not as rediff and microsoft.

    Wednesday, April 18, 2007 7:19 PM
  • there are very few posts inthis forum
    which gives a ton of information like this..
    Wednesday, April 18, 2007 11:47 PM
  • Just To clear out the doubts of Kanav, I m posting the Web Designs Basics now....

    What is the web?

    In a nutshell, the web is a whole bunch on interconnected computers talking to one another. The computers (on the web) are typically connected by phone lines, digital satellite signals, cables, and other types of data-transfer mechanisms. A 'data-transfer mechanism' is a nerd's way of saying: a way to move information from point A to point B to point C and so on.

    The computers that make up the web can be connected all the time (24/7), or they can be connected only periodically. The computers that are connected all the time are typically called a 'server'. Servers are computers just like the one you're using now to read this article, with one major difference, they have a special software installed called 'server' software.

    What is the function of server software / programs?

    Server software is created to 'serve' web pages and web sites. Basically, the server computer has a bunch of web sites loaded on it and it just waits for people (via web browsers) to request or ask for a particular page. When the browser requests a page the server sends it out.

    How does the web surfer find a web site?

    The short answer is: by typing in the URL, or in other words, the web site address. So for example, if you wanted to find the web site http://www.killersites.com/, you would type in the address into your web browser's address bar or maybe use your 'favorites' or 'bookmarks' link to Killersites.

    There are other ways to find web sites (like search engines,) but behind the scenes web sites are all being found by going to the web site's official address. That brings us our last nerd detail: how does a website get an official address so that the rest of the web can find it?

    Registering your domain name

    If you ever wondered what the heck registering a domain was all about ... you probably figured it out by now! But just in case - registering a domain name gets you an official address for your web site on the World Wide Web. With this 'official' address, the rest of the web can find you.

    Like your home address is unique in the real world, there also can't be any duplicate addresses on the Internet, otherwise no one would know where to go! In other words, domain names are unique addresses on the web.

    Why does registering a domain name cost money?

    If you want to have your own unique address on the web, your own domain name, it will cost a few bucks for each year you want to 'own' the name. The cost of registering a domain name ranges from less than $10 USD to about $30 USD per year. You can register a domain from 1 to 10 years.

    The reason for the cost is that the central 'address book' of all the world's domain names needs to be updated - somebody's got to pay for that! You may have noticed that I just snuck in a little extra piece of information: the giant 'web address book' of domains.

    That leads us to our last bit of nerd information: when you type in a website's domain name or click on a link that takes you to that domain name, your browser starts asking servers where that particular domain name is sitting (on the web) and the servers are then able to tell the browser where to go by referring to the giant address book I mentioned above.


    Thursday, April 19, 2007 3:42 AM
  • Getting your web site 'live' on the Web

    With the nerd background details under our belts, we can now learn about the two steps to going live on the Web:

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->1.    <!--[endif]-->Register your domain.

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->2.    <!--[endif]-->Rent some server space.

    1. Registering your domain

    There are many companies out there that allow you to register the domain name for your web site. Prices vary, as does the quality of service, but at the end of the day, they all handle the details of getting your domain name listed in the giant address book I spoke about earlier.

    These days, you will find that many of the names you may be interested in registering are already taken. As I mentioned above, domain names have to be unique and many have been slurped up.

    What is the difference between .com, .net, .org, etc.?

    Practically speaking, there is really no difference these days. Search engines don't discriminate between a .COM address and a .NET address. The only thing you might consider is that people tend to type in .COM automatically since it was the first publicly known domain extension. So when registering a domain name, I would go for the .COM first and if it was taken, I would then try for any of the others. (.net, .org, .tv, etc. ...)

    You probably guessed; a .COM address is not the same domain name of the same name with a different extension.

    As such, each of the addresses can be registered separately.

    2. Renting server space to 'host' your web site

    You need to rent space on a server so that it can serve your web site to the World Wide Web; this is often called 'hosting'. Companies that provide this service are often called 'host' or hosting companies.

    After you've registered your domain, all you need to do is contact a hosting company and tell them your domain name. They will be able to guide you through the process and you should be live on the web in no time - typically within a week or less.

    Thursday, April 19, 2007 3:45 AM
  • A cheaper option

    Some people may not want to buy a domain or pay for hosting because they only have a personal web site for fun or practice. You can still get your website live on the web by using a free hosting service that allows you to create what is called a 'sub-domain'. A sub-domain is just a domain that is part of another domain. So if killersites.com offered sub-domain hosting you could have an address like:

    www.killersites.com/yourWebsite/

    Or it could be like:

    http://yourWebsite.killersites.com

    Whichever way the free hosting service decides to do it. The point is that your web site domain is really a part of the parent domain, in this case killersites.com. Doing it this way, you don't need to buy a domain name, and you don't need to pay for hosting.

    This is fine for fun or project websites, but if you are serious about your web site (say it's your business website) using sub-domains is like taking someone else's business card and writing your name on it! You figure it out ...

    One last point, I've heard of free hosting services that will allow you to host proper domains with them for free and without annoying ads that other free hosts will insert into your pages. But I've never used them, and in my opinion you always get what you pay for. In the internet's recent past there was once a crop of free service providers that would give away access to the web via dial-up, they were notorious for bad service and all have since gone bankrupt ... I wonder why?

    Moving your website files onto the server

    After you have your domain name registered and your hosting service in place, the last step is to upload the website onto the server. You can transfer your web site to your host's server using an FTP program.

    An FTP program is a type of software that is used to move files from one computer to another over the Internet. FTP is the acronym for: File Transfer Protocol; this just means that this is a 'way' of moving files.

    There are several free FTP programs you can use to move your files and many HTML editors and web design programs like Dreamweaver have FTP capabilities built in.

    One option you probably have to 'FTP' your files to the server is Internet Explorer. Internet Explorer 5 and up have an FTP program built right in. You can use it by typing in the FTP address of the server in the address bar preceded by the keyword: FTP. Here is an example:

    FTP://207.35.15.69/yourwebsite

    Thursday, April 19, 2007 3:51 AM
  • What no response???
    people please contribute.. ask questions.. i hv more stuff on this, but if no one is interested than i wont waste time posting stuff for myself only.....
    Sunday, April 22, 2007 2:41 AM
  • See Varun, the reason that you are not getting responses is that you are just concentrating on theory, and not on practical applications. The people here are more interested in learning practical things, rather then keep reading boring theories.

    It would be better if you start with practical examples. If you want, then I can start sharing my knowledge about website programming.
    Sunday, April 22, 2007 4:13 PM
  • Bro I m shouting at the top, "Please Give your contribution..."
    U dont need a invitation to do it.. i thought you were going to post good stuff, but all of a sudden you stopped posting, so i had to post the theory portion... Even i m new in this area.. I m just sharing the basic stuff that i found here and there.. you can give us the more practicle impact of the topic.. In between i can post some of theortical portions.. So just start posting..

    This is not only for Sanket , but all the people who have some stuff to share...
    Sunday, April 22, 2007 4:51 PM
  • Although you are shouting, but on my 1st post when I showed code, you replied that its getting bouncer.

    That's the reason for which I've seeked permission of yours. Wink
    Sunday, April 22, 2007 4:58 PM
  • hey!!

    want ur help??

    i m using google adsense in mah  blog...but they hav'nt confirmed it..

    waht more should  i  add in it  to make  full use of that

    Wednesday, April 25, 2007 7:34 PM
  • Sanket This is for you.. please do reply to the Akshat's Query.. Also explain how the searching works on website and what are the different ways we can have to search in out website???
    Thursday, April 26, 2007 2:56 AM
  • A website is just a bunch of web pages connected together through something called links. In HTML there is a special tag called (you guessed it!) the 'link' tag, and it looks like this in its most basic form:

    <a href="..."> </a>

    And here is an example of the link tag with a destination filled in:

    <a href=" http://www.killersites.com "> Go to killersites.com</a>

    It's safe to say that we have all used links when surfing the web. Whenever you click on a link that takes you to another page, you are using a link tag. The link tag is the most important tag in HTML; it makes the Internet interconnected!


    In the above example, we see that the link tag points to the web site www.killersites.com and the text that is displayed on the web page is: 'Go to killersites.com'. So if you wanted to create a link that took someone to www.yahoo.com, for example, you would replace the www.killersites.com with www.yahoo.com, Yahoo's address.

    Like all other tags, link tags have an opening tag (<a href=" http://www.killersites.com ">) and a closing tag (</a>). Links tags are a little more complex than the other tags we have seen so far, but I think that you can handle it!

    Some of you may have noticed that there is some text in the link tag that comes before the web site address; the text I am talking about is this:

    http://

    This text tells the browser that the link is pointing to a web page. Sometimes links can point to other things besides web pages; things like movies, PDF files, and so on.

    Absolute vs. Relative URL

    To link pages in your web site from one page to the next you have a choice of using one of two types of addresses: absolute addresses (complete) and relative addresses (partial).

    Before I go on, URL is a nerd's way of saying 'address'.

    An absolute URL is the complete address of a page that can be found from any other location on the Internet. So let's say you have a page called contact.html on the root of your web site who's domain name is www.myStore.com . In this case, the absolute URL of the contact.html page would be:

    'http://www.myStore.com/contact.html'

    Ok, now I know I lost a few people because I used a word that I did not explain: 'root'.

    When geeks talk about the root of a web site, they are taking about the base of the web site, the starting level.

    The files (pages, images, etc.) that make up your web site are organized in folders just like any other files that you store on your home computer. Your host will give you a space/directory on their server for you to place all your website's files.

    This space/folder assigned to you will be the 'root' of your web site. This means that as far as the Internet is concerned, anything (html files, images, other folders, etc.) in this folder is directly accessible by your domain name plus the name of the item. Huh! Even I'm a little confused! Perhaps a little example will explain this better:

    Let's say that on the root level of your website, you had these HTML files:

    index.html and contact.html

    And in a folder called 'products', you placed whole bunch of other pages with one called 'bookcases.html'. You decided to put all your 'product' HTML pages into a 'products' folder to keep the web site more organized - a smart thing to do!

    Sunday, April 29, 2007 1:01 PM

  • Can you guess what the absolute URL would be for the web page 'bookcases.html'? For the domain name: 'www.myStore.com' it would be:

    http://www.myStore.com/products/bookcases.html

    Just think about it a little and hopefully it will sink in! If it doesn't right away, don't worry, it will come.

     
    RELATIVE URLS

    A relative URL is a partial address that is relative to the page where you placed your link. So if you were linking from the index.html page of this web site to the bookcases.html page your relative URL (address) would be:

    /products/bookcases.html

    And the actual link tag would look like this:

    <a href="/products/bookcases.html">Check out our bookcases!</a>

    You are basically telling the browser that the HTML page we want to load is in the products folder. Play around with links and folders on your own web site and things will become very clear. This is important because if you get the address wrong, it won't load!

    Ok, one more example to help you guys and gals out there: lets say you wanted to link to the page 'contact.html' from the 'index.html' page:

    <a href="contact.html">Contact us</a>

    Since the page 'contact.html' is on the same level as the page 'index.html', we need only include the name of the html file in the link address.

    Summary of the process of creating a web site

    Now that we got some preliminary theory out of the way (it's about time,) we can actually go over the 10 steps you'll need to take to build and bring a website 'live' on the World Wide Web.

    1. Define the purpose of the web site

    When starting a web site project, you must first clarify what the goals of the website are. Knowing your goals will impact the choices you make when putting the web site together and ultimately contribute to its success or failure.

    This may sound obvious, but many web sites seemed to have been put together without the goal kept in mind. The result is a messy web site that is disorganized and harder to build and maintain.

    So if, for example, the goal is to create an e-commerce web site that sells products, then as a web site designer you have to consider things like the following:

    1. Do you need credit card processing capabilities?
    2. Are you going to need a shopping cart system to take orders?
    3. How many items will be sold on the web site?

    This is just one example. The point to take away is that by defining the purpose you can better prepare and get the right tools / people for the job.

    2. Diagram the structure of the website.

    A simple diagram helps to visualize the web site for both you and your client - this assuming someone has hired you to build a website. Nothing special is really needed, just a series of boxes representing each page in the site with lines connecting them showing the linking strategy. A pyramid scheme is usually used to show the hierarchy of a web site from the splash/home page down*.

    Sunday, April 29, 2007 1:03 PM

  • 3. Write out the text for the web site

    Before you start writing any HTML, you should (in your favorite word processor) write out all the text that you need to include in the website. Doing so will help you with the design process.

    Another thing you should do is to make sure that the text is finalized before it gets to the web site; it is much easier to correct things in a word processor than in an HTML page.




    4. Choose a basic layout that will be used on all pages

    Armed with your website diagram and your web site's text (complete text!) you can now choose a basic layout for your pages. You can go crazy with some funky artsy web site (and sometimes it can work), but most of the time you should use standard layouts that people are used to:

    1. Left side navigation.
    2. Top navigation
    3. Right side navigation.

    When in doubt, think of how books are laid out.

    5. Choose the basic color scheme and fonts for the site

    Your next task is to start considering the basic colors and fonts that you're going to use. You want to choose a style that fits the subject of the web site. For example: pink doesn't do well for a hardware store, maybe some steel blues instead! The point to take away is to establish the style of the web site before you start creating pages, otherwise you may find yourself doing pages over again!

    Later on in this tutorial I will teach you how to use an easy to use technology that makes web sites a breeze to style: CSS

    Sunday, April 29, 2007 1:05 PM

  • 6. Build out the website

    With the before-mentioned completed, you're ready to actually start creating your web pages. So what you need to do is:

    1. Take the structure you developed in steps 1 to 5 to create your web pages.
    2. Link the web pages together.

    Now is the time for you to practice a little and actually build a small web site! If you can't think of something, create one on your favorite movie with a page for each main character.

    Remember that you only get good at doing something by doing it!



    7. Choose a domain name

    Once your website is built, you will need to get it on the web - that means you need a domain name.

    All websites need a domain name, and your choice of a domain name can impact on how many people find iyour website, so choose carefully! Here are some points to remember when considering your choice of a domain name:

    1. Domain names that tell you something about the web site are food for search engines and they help clue people in, too. If for example you were building a website for a hardware store, a domain name like 'discountHardware.com' is pretty good, it tells you everything about the web site immediately. If you called it 'bigSteel.com' instead, you can argue that we are not giving such a clear message of what the web site is about. Even if the hardware store was actually called 'Big Steel Hardware', I would go with 'discountHardware.com'.
    2. Search engines such as Google will look at several elements of your web site to try and determine what your website is about. One of those key elements is the domain name; Google will look for keywords in the domain name that help the 'Google bot' (Google's automated snooper software) to categorize your web site.

    One question that is asked often enough is whether the domain name has to have the same name as the business it is representing - the answer is no.


    Sunday, April 29, 2007 1:07 PM

  • 8. Register your domain name

    This can be trickier than you think, since many of the good domain names are taken. You can pretty much forget about single-word domain names like business.com and auctions.com; they are long gone! You will need to come up with combination words like 'how-to-build-websites.com'.



    Today you have many more options for domains; in the past, businesses could only register .com's because .net and .org domains where reserved for special types of organizations. Those old restrictions are now gone, and there are a wide variety of extensions you can choose from:

    .com, .net, .org, .tv, .biz, and several others including country codes like .ca (Canada), .us (USA), .co.uk (United Kingdom) et cetera.

    In terms of the search engines, it makes no difference which ending (extension) you use.

    Some people might argue that the first thing you need to do is to register your domain name, then build your web site. That may be true if your website design is impacted by the domain ... for some people this is the case, and for others it isn't. You can make that call for your own websites.

    How do you know if a domain is already taken?

    The quickest way to figure this out is to type in the domain name in your browser and see if it takes you anywhere. This is not always useful though because many domains have been bought but have no website!

    That means the best way to figure this out is to go to your registrar. Every registrar will have a form where you can check to see if domains names are available just by typing it in.

    The best thing about going to the registrar is that when you type in a domain name you are interested in their systems will not only tell you if the .com is available, they will also give you the scoop on all the other variations - a big time saver.

    9. Find a hosting company: what to look for in A hosT

    Today, hosting web sites cost much less than what they did just a few years ago, and that's a good thing. You can go from zero cost hosting to very pricey solutions, depending on your web site's needs.

    What can affect the cost of hosting a website?

    • Traffic - more traffic can cost you more per month. But for this to affect you, you would have to have a pretty popular web site. Since you are just starting out, I wouldn't expect that problem for a while.
    • Extra features / services - you may need to use a database (for e-commerce) or need many email accounts, extra disk space to store all your websites files. Each host will have a list of plans that you can choose from depending on your needs.

    In the end you have to choose the hosting company and hosting plan that is best suited to for your web site. Cheaper is not always best, but it may be good enough for you.

    10. Upload your website to the hosting company's server

    Once you created your web site, paid for your domain name, and picked your hosting company, it's time to upload the web site onto your host server for the world to see. Typically, you would use something called FTP to do this; you hosting company should be able to help you with the details when setting up your account.



    Sunday, April 29, 2007 1:09 PM
  • Guys this are some of the priceless information that i m posting.. show your support for more such stuff.. and please contribute...

    Some quick tips to remember

    1. Keeping web pages small - under 60k
    2. Keeping content headers (H2 tags) clear and to the point.
    3. Keep paragraphs small.
    4. Keep contact information (email - phone) easily found in same place on all pages.
    5. Keep look and structure of the web pages consistent across all pages.
    6. Provide a 'Home' button to take the user back to the cover (a.k.a.: splash, home) page of the website.
    7. Make sure links are always underlined. (Don't use CSS to remove the underline: big mistake if you do since people assume that underlined texts are links.)
    8. The company logo should appear on every page in the same spot and it should always be a link back to the home page.

    Sunday, April 29, 2007 1:11 PM
  • Anyone out there... I  m still waiting for replies...
    Tuesday, May 1, 2007 3:05 AM
  • hi varun,

    Its my turn to put some stuff.

     

    --Use images as least as possible.

    --Most appropriate image files used are GIF, PNG, JPEG

    --Images of small size.

    --We can use flash contents in our web pages for animation, advertisement etc.

     

    Now a days flash files are seen in most of the websites as they are giving higer resolutions to the contents.

    Tuesday, May 1, 2007 6:21 PM
  • Thankz for the contribution buddy.. just keep them coming in... waiting for more...
    Wednesday, May 2, 2007 2:58 AM
  • hi , i had uploaded a whitepaper, regarding what we are discussing now, so please have a look at it and i am sure that the whitepaper will be helpful to a great extent to all those interested in web designing. afterall, you can gain points if you download to read the whitepaper?

    note: pls rate the whitepaper, if you like it or if  u r downloading it

     

    http://studentrockstar.cybage.com/studrockstar/WhitePaperFiles/webdesignbook.pdf

     

    thanks

     

    Wednesday, May 2, 2007 8:39 PM
  •  

    We can use a background picture for web page instead of background color. You must have a

    ready image file in .gif or .jpg formats. Now you must extend <BODY> tag as below. "image1.gif"

    is file name of he image we want to use as background image.

     

    <BODY BACKGROUND="image1.gif">

     

    Example :

    <HTML>

    <HEAD>

    <TITLE>Page with background image</TITLE>

    </HEAD>

    <BODY BACKGROUND="image1.gif">

    <B>Page with background image.</B>

    </BODY>

    </HTML>

     

    *Image file must be in the same folder as your html file. Otherwise browser will not be able to find

      it.

    Saturday, May 5, 2007 7:23 PM
  • Hi everybody,

    I have done a lot of freelance web designing so i have some basic knowledge about HTML. I want to share my experiences, and if anybody has any questions, feel free to ask...

    We have all seen how to create basic pages, and some of the popular tags used. We were discussing about reducing the page size, thereby making pages load faster. Here are a couple of things you should keep in mind.

    1. Images - Try to convert images of smaller size like gif. Please note that this will reduce the quality of the image. But if done correctly using the proper tools like Macromedia Fireworks, this will help you make pages load faster a lot.

    2. Flash - Reduce the amount of flash animations.

    3. Rollover Effect - The change of an image, when you move the mouse over it is called Rollover effect. A lot of WYSIWYG editors allow you to provide the images and it will create the rollover effects for you without writing a single line of code.

    What i suggest is, use CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) to mimic the same effects without use of the images.

     

    If you want to know more about CSS, please let me know. I can also teach a lot of cool stuff like playing around scripts, optimizing pages for cross-browser and cross-resolutio compatibility. If you are all interested i can even teach you SEO (Search Engine optimization) for managing your search ranking in many search engines like Google and Windows Live Search.

     

    Waiting for your comments,

     

    Adnan

     

    Saturday, May 5, 2007 8:32 PM
  • Thatz good Adnan, you dont need a invitation, just keep them coming in.. we are learning a lot here.. and thankz for sharing the information with us..
    So just keep the stuff rolling in....
    Sunday, May 6, 2007 4:32 AM
  • Ok lets start with the basics. The explanation of the code used is given in the webpage istelf. If you still have any more questions, please let me know...

    Note: Copy the code on the notepad and save it as <"testpage.html"> with the quotation marks.


     

    Code Snippet

    <html>
    <head>
    <title>My first HTML page</title>
    </head>

    <body>
    <h1>Welcome to HTML tutorial</h1>
    <h2>Welcome to HTML tutorial</h2>
    <h3>Welcome to HTML tutorial</h3>
    <h4>Welcome to HTML tutorial</h4>
    <h5>Welcome to HTML tutorial</h5>
    <h6>Welcome to HTML tutorial</h6>
    <hr />
    This was a horizontal line
    <hr/>
    <p>This is a new paragraph. The paragraph tag starts with &lt;p&gt; and ends with &lt;/p&gt;. You can use attributes to define how paragraph look like.</p>
    <hr />
    <b>This text is bold. You can use the &lt;b&gt; tag, or &lt;strong&gt; tag instead. </b>
    <hr/>
    <em>This text is italic, using &lt;em&gt; tag. </em>
    <hr/>
    <blockquote>This text has been indented using &lt;blockquote&gt; tag. Its like using the Tab key in Microsoft Word.</blockquote>
    <hr/>
    The underlined text is a <a href="#">hyperlink</a>. A hyperlink is a link which allows us to go to another page. We ue the anchor tag to make hyperlinks. The anchor tag is used by &lt;a&gt; and the attribute used for hyperlink is href.
    <hr/>
    <h3>Congragulations, you have now learned to use the basic tags of HTML. In the next lesson we will study some more tags and how we can set attributes to it. Happy Learning :) !!!</h3>
    </body>
    </html>

     

     Waiting for your feedback!

    Sunday, May 6, 2007 10:58 AM
  • Nice one buddy.. waiting for some more advance Tags...
    Sunday, May 6, 2007 11:26 AM
  • Lets look at some essential tags we will use for making webpages.

     

    Code Snippet

    <html>
    <head>
    <title>Lesson 2</title>
    </head>
    <body>
    <h3>Creating an ordered list</h3>
    <ol>
      <li>List item 1</li>
      <li>List item 2</li>
      <li>List item 3</li>
    </ol>
    <hr/>
    <h3>Creating a bullet list</h3>
    <ul>
      <li>List item 1</li>
      <li>List item 2</li>
      <li>List item 3</li>
    </ul>
    <hr/>
    <h3>Mathematical Tags</h3>
    Superscript : abcd<sup>efgh</sup> <br/>
    Subscript : abcd<sub>efgh</sub> <br/>
    <hr/>
    <h3>Special Characters :</h3>
    &copy; <br/>
    &reg; <br/>
    &#8482; <br/>
    &pound; <br/>
    &yen; <br/>
    &#8364; <br/>
    &#402;
    <hr/>
    <h3>Scrolling text</h3>
    <marquee direction="left">
    This text is moving left becuase direction is set to left
    </marquee>
    <br/>
    <marquee direction="right">
    This text is moving right becuase direction is set to right
    </marquee>
    </body>
    </html>

     

    Sunday, May 6, 2007 2:34 PM
  •  Varun_Modi_a59ed9 wrote:
    Nice one buddy.. waiting for some more advance Tags...

    exactly, even m waiting for some advancd tags, somebody please post if they know some good ones....

     

    @adnan....nice list there...

    Sunday, May 6, 2007 10:02 PM
  • Lets play around with tables which are very important for proper layout of the website. There are tons of attributes, you can use. Experiment and let me know the results.

     

    Code Snippet
    <html>
    <head>
    <meta'>http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
    <head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" />
    <title>Untitled Document</title>
    </head>
    <body>
    <h3>Tables, divs and colors</h3>
    <table width="100%" border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0">
      <tr>
        <td>To make a table, use the &lt;table&gt; tag. You can make rows with the &lt;tr&gt; tag and colums with the &lt;td&gt; tag within the table tag. </td>
      </tr>
    </table>
    <br/>
    <table bgcolor="CYAN" width="100%">
      <tr>
        <td>Background Color can be set using the bgcolor=&quot;COLOR&quot; attribute </td>
      </tr>
    </table>
    <br/>
    <table bordercolor="RED" border="1" width="100%">
      <tr>
        <td>Border color can be set using the bordercolor=&quot;COLOR&quot; attribute along with the border=&quot;NUMBER&quot; atribute to define the thickness of the border. </td>
      </tr>
    </table>
    <br/>
    <table width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" >
      <tr>
        <td>You can also use the cellpadding=&quot;NUMBER&quot; and cellspacing=&quot;NUMBER&quot; attributes to define the spacing and the padding between the cells of the table.</td>
      </tr>
    </table>
    <p>
    <div align="center">This text is inside a div tag</div>
    </p>
    <p><span style="color:BLUE; background-color:RED; border: GREEN dashed thin; text-align: center;">We can use the style tag to set different attributes of text, tables, border and a lot of other things.</span></p>
    <table width="100%" border="1" bordercolor="BLACK">
      <tr>
        <td>Row - 1 ; Column - 1 ; </td>
        <td>Row - 1 ; Column - 2 ;</td>
        <td>Row - 1 ; Column - 3 ;</td>
        <td>Row - 1 ; Column - 4 ;</td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td>Row - 2 ; Column - 1 ;</td>
        <td>Row - 2 ; Column - 2 ;</td>
        <td>Row - 2 ; Column - 3 ;</td>
        <td>Row - 2 ; Column - 4 ;</td>
      </tr>
    </table>
    </body>
    </html>

     


    If you have any questions, please feel free to ask me. Waiting for your feedback.

    Tuesday, May 8, 2007 7:22 AM
  • Nice work Adnan, due to exams i m not able to be so active, but please go on, I will mark your posts as a reply from my side... and will contribute more after a week...
    Tuesday, May 8, 2007 11:55 AM
  • Thanks for the encouragement Varun. But i want this learning process to be an interactive one. This way, everybody including me can learn a lot of new things. Anway, i'll keep posting even if theres only a single person who's benefiting....
    Tuesday, May 8, 2007 1:58 PM
  • Good thread fro web development learners Smile

    Nice one....
    Wednesday, May 9, 2007 9:16 AM
  • In this lesson we will study about style classes. Once you are clear with the fundamentals of this session, then creating stylesheets will be a breeze. Stylesheets allow you to define generic properties which can be used throughout the website maintaining consistency, and less code on your part. Enough about the theory, lets do the practical.

     

    Code Snippet

    <html>
    <head>
    <title>Stylesheet class</title>
    <style type="text/css">
    <!--
    .border{
     border: solid black 1px;
     background-color: white;
    }
    .redtext{
     font-family: Verdana;
     background-color: white;
     color: red;
    }
    .bluetext{
     font-family: Geneva;
     color: blue;
     background-color: white;
    }
    .hyperlink{
     color: #CC6600;
     font-family: Verdana;
     background-color: white;
    }
    a.hyperlink
    {
     color: #cc6600;
     font-family: Verdana;
     background-color: white;
    }
    a.hyperlink:link{
     text-decoration: underline;
    }
    a.hyperlink:hover{
     color: red;
     text-decoration: none;
    }
    a.hyperlink:visited{
     color: blue;
     text-decoration: line-through;
    }
    p{
     font: Arial;
     color: green;
     background-color: white;
     text-decoration: underline;
    }
    -->
    </style>
    </head>
    <body>
    <table width="100%" class="border">
      <tr>
        <td class="bluetext">This text will appear blue because of the bluetext class assigned to the td tag</td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td class="redtext">This text will appear red with a different font becase of the redtext class applied to this td tag </td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td class="hyperlink">This text will take the properties of the hyperlink class. Try clicking the following link:<br/>
        <br/><a href="#" class="hyperlink">HYPERLINK TO ANOTHER PAGE</a></td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td>These classes can be applied to any element. The same classes can be defined for the tags itself. For example look at the text in the p tag :</td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td><p>This text will take the properties of the p tag.</p></td>
      </tr>
    </table>
    </body>
    </html>

     

    Wednesday, May 9, 2007 3:23 PM
  • Hello everyone, I hope that the tutorials so far have been helpful in learning HTML. There are a lot of other topics we can cover like, CSS, Search engine optimization, etc. Please let me know, what would like to learn next.
    Monday, May 14, 2007 1:16 AM
  • Yes adnan this thread has been good. I think you can try about some XML, XSL and XSD. if you dont got much idea about it, then CSS will just do fine Wink

    Best of luck m8.
    Monday, May 14, 2007 3:26 AM
  • try www.w3schools.com
    Monday, May 14, 2007 5:43 AM
  •  Adnan_Hussain_b89496 wrote:
    Hello everyone, I hope that the tutorials so far have been helpful in learning HTML. There are a lot of other topics we can cover like, CSS, Search engine optimization, etc. Please let me know, what would like to learn next.

    surely adnan, it was definitely useful, .... i think SEO, is the current trend, you can start with that...

    Monday, May 14, 2007 8:20 PM
  • In this tutorial, we will learn about using CSS. Lets look at some theory.

    CSS is an external file which store element information in an external file, rather than the web page itself. This way, all you have to do, is just include the file in all your webpages and start using it. The advantage is that, it will reduce the amount of code you will have to write for each web page and by using CSS you can maintain consistency throughout your website.

    If you are new to CSS, i suggest you use TopStyle Lite (free) for learning all the different attributes available.

     

    NOTE: Please save this file as stylesheet.css (you can have any filename)

    /* CSS Document */
    body{
     margin: 10px;
     background-color: white;
     border: dotted black 2px;
    }

    .blacktext{
     color: black;
     font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
     font-style: normal;
     font-size: medium;
     font-weight: lighter;
    }

    .redtext{
     color: red;
     font-family: Geneva, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
     font-style: italic;
     font-size: 16px;
     font-weight: bolder;
     word-spacing: 4px;
     line-height: 24px;
     text-align: left;
    }

    li{
     list-style-type: circle;
     list-style-position: outside;
    }

    table{
     color: green;
     font-family: "Courier New", Courier, monospace;
     font-size: small;
     border: dashed green 2px;
     text-align: center;
    }

    #list
    {
     list-style-type: square;
     font-family: "Times New Roman", Times, serif;
     font-size: small;
    }

    .link
    {
     color: red;
     font-family: serif;
     font-size: small;
    }

    a.link
    {
     color:red;
     font-family: serif;
     font-size: small;
    }

    a.link:hover
    {
     color: blue;
     font-size: medium;
    }

     

     

    NOTE: Please save this file in the same directory as the css file, or change the path in the link tag.
    <html>
    <head>
    <title>CSS tutotrial</title>
    <link href="stylesheet.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
    </head>
    <body>
    <p class="redtext">This text will appear in red as i am using the redtext class from the css. Try changing some of the attributes to notice in the difference</p>
    <p class="blacktext">This text will appear in balck. Please note that for applying the style, you need to use the class attribute. This is possible if your class preceeds with the . symbol </p>
    <table width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0">
      <tr>
        <td><p>Since i have set the style for the table tag directly (without preceeding the class with .) This stylesheet will be applied to all the tables throughout the webpage</p>    </td>
      </tr>
    </table>
    <ul>
      <li>I have also changed the list style. of the li tag</li>
      <li>You can even have an image, apart from the predefined list-type's</li>
    </ul>
    <p>&nbsp;</p>
    <ul>
      <li id="list">You can also define identifier's</li>
      <li id="list">This is applied by using the id attribute</li>
      <li id="list">This is possible if you write the class name preceeding with the # symbol</li>
    </ul>
    For more information about CSS, please visit the following <a class="link" href="http://www.w3schools.com/css/css_reference.asp">link</a>
    </body>
    </html>

     


     

    Tuesday, May 15, 2007 7:05 AM
  • Thanks @Adnan.
    Tuesday, May 15, 2007 8:24 AM
  • Nice one Adnan.. this stuff really helps a lot.. just keep them coming in...
    Tuesday, May 15, 2007 9:02 AM
  • adnan, nice of you to share info about CSS....do keep posting such meaningful and helpful contents
    Tuesday, May 15, 2007 7:17 PM
  • Thank you for the encouragement everyone. It gives me immense pleasure to know, that my help is appreciated.

    Well, now that we are familiar with the basics of HTML, its tags, CSS and some of the common used attributes. Lets look at meta tags. These tags are important for various reasons. These tags help Search Engines know what the webpage is about, some of the keywords that will help search and index your wbpage(s), author information, HTML standard used, etc.

    So let the fun begin.

    Please use this code before the <body> tag.
    <HTML LANG=en-US>
    <HEAD>
    <TITLE>Welcome to the HTML meta tag tutorial</TITLE>
    <META NAME="keywords" CONTENT="tutorial,meta,tag,search,index,HTML">
    <META NAME="description" CONTENT="This tutorial aims to understand the syntax, attributes, available formats and the importance of meta tags in web pages.">
    <META NAME="copyright" CONTENT="MSDN">
    <META NAME="author" CONTENT="Adnan Rashid">
    <META NAME="robots" CONTENT="FOLLOW,INDEX">
    </HEAD>

     The keywords, allow the search engines to get a basic idea, what the page is about.
    The description tag, is the text you will see below the website name in the search results, giving the viewers more information about the page.
    The copyright and author attributes indentify the owner and creator of the webpage.
    The robots tag, indicates the permission for spiders (application to search for web pages by search engines. Also referred as bots) to crawl the webpage.
    You can also use the meta refresh tag to redirect the browser to a different page.
    <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="10;url=http://www.microsoft.com">
    This will instruct to refresh the webpage every 10 seconds. The url mentions the page, which the browser should redirect to.
    If the url is not specified the page will only refresh.
    Happy coding!!!
    Tuesday, May 15, 2007 9:23 PM
  • hey adnan, i must say that its a good summary of the meta tag....well one query just came to my mind...assuming that a user while designing his, web pages, does not include meta tag, then will his site be scanned by the spiders? and will be displayed in the results?

     

     

    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 9:48 AM
  • Interesting question Anoop. For search engines to successfully crawl your website, you will need meta tags. Having meta tags, will not only help search engines crawl your homepage, but also will inform them about the unique content of each and every page, thus helping in getting better search results.

    An alternative but not as effective way, it to make sitemaps. For example you can make a sitemap for Google using Coffee cup Simteap builder, and submit it to the Google webmaster tools.

    This technique is better than manually submitting your website to search engines, as it increases the search index rank.

     

    I will also have a tutorial about Search Engine Optimization soon...

    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 10:05 AM
  • This is really good information buddy. thankz a lot for it.. just keep them coming...

    But I have one question... if you dont include the meta tag for giving permission to the robots.. then your page is not their in the search engine???

    and how do you submit or declare it to a search engine that your webpage is up and ready to be indexed by the engine???
    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 11:42 AM
  • Let more of them coming Wink

    Its really awesome info in good level of details.
    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 12:06 PM
  • @Varun. Having meta tags, on your webpages is not enough. The spiders should know that your website exists. The best way to do this is to submit a Google Sitemap to the Google Webmaster tools.

    Another possible solutions is that a website which links to your website is crawled. This way the spider finds your website and starts crawling it.

    The basic idea is, somebody or something(website) should direct the spider to your website, otherwise it wont know your website exists....

    Hope this answers your question.

    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 2:27 PM
  • Lets look at some tools which will ease web development.

    The current market has many WYSIWYG editors. These tools reduce the amount of code the designer has to write. The most popular being Dreamweaver. Another great tool available is Microsoft Expression Web.

    Knowing HTML and using these designers is not enough. You will need to have basic knowledge of image editing and manipulation. There are many softwares for image editing. The best of these tools is PhotoShop but it has a high learning curve, is very difficult for beginners, but is the most effective. Other tools include, Fireworks and PhotoImpact.

    If you are a beginner with CSS, i highly recommend Bradsoft TopStyle Pro.

    If you know of a good software, please share with us...

    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 3:36 PM
  • Good info my friend. I know i cant contribute much cause i dont have much info about it. But i am learning a lot from this thread Smile Thanks guys, keep it going.
    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 3:51 PM
  • Thankz Adnan.. that surely answered my question
    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 4:43 PM
  • Glad to be of help my friend.
    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 4:52 PM
  • @adnan - thanks for the info about the meta tags and clearing my doubt,,,,,,well about thw WYSIWYG editors, i think coffeecup html editor is good for beginners who are trying out web development using html, also microsoft frontpage, used along with microsoft publisher, works wonders....but these are very static web page creation...

    does anybody know of editors that allow, to create client server interactions and dynamic web pages...??

    Friday, May 18, 2007 1:06 PM
  • Hey Adnan, while trying to learn about Drupal CMS, I was hearing a lot about the meta tag module, but was not able to understand it before, now i know its use...

    Also can you tell me what is static pages and dynamic pages.....
    Friday, May 18, 2007 2:57 PM
  • @Varun. There are a lot of different definitions of static and dynamic pages in different contexts.

    Statis pages are just used to display information. Dynamic pages, have forms and other interactive elements, which allow input from users. This form may be handled by a mechanism like CGI (common gateway interface) and is stored in some database of format like XML.

    Hope this answers your question...

    Friday, May 18, 2007 5:49 PM
  • Ohh, now i understand.. now i will try to find the way of creating dynamic pages in drupal... thanks for the explanation...
    Friday, May 18, 2007 6:27 PM
  • @Anoop. What type of dynamic features are you looking for? If you want something like a form, which you want to be emailed to you, then you will need to use CGI and handle the form with a perl script. If you want to make the pages more interactive, you can use javascripts. Tons of free js are available at http://www.dynamicdrive.com .

    Friday, May 18, 2007 7:49 PM
  • HI varun

    if you really want to learn this web designing

    then start firstlw with html basics  then javascript

    then decide whether you want to move to .Net side or j2ee side

    Saturday, May 19, 2007 6:06 AM
  • Very good resourceful thread. Keep it up guys. I am learning a lot from this thread. Please dont stop it, let me continue Smile
    Saturday, May 19, 2007 4:49 PM
  • Yes Prashant, to build web applications we can use either .net or java. But html will not be enough. If you are looking at the .net side, you wil need to code in visual basic/c#. You will also need some basic knowledge of sql to bind data.

    If you look at the java side, you will need knowledge of JSF(Java Server Faces) to build DAL(Data Abstraction Layer) for applications, jsp and applets. In short, fundamental of almost all the concepts in J2EE.

    I am a .net fan. If somebody wants to build a dynamic application, i suggest you to view some of the videos on http://www.asp.net and http://www.learnvisualstudio.com . http://www.w3schools.com is a fantastic place to learn new web technologies. Building .net applications is easy, using the 2.0 framework with almost all the control ready to be used and with thew power of AJAX, you will be amazed at what you can create.

    The opportuites are endless!!!

    Saturday, May 19, 2007 9:58 PM
  • Monday, May 21, 2007 10:57 AM
  • Since we have all discussed Search Engine optimization, lets look at Google's page rank in detail.

    For those of you who are unfamiliar, Google has made the concept of PG to understand the importance of your page on the internet. In a simple explanation, the more pages that are linked to you, the more is the importance of your webpage and the more PG you will have. Heres and article...

    http://www.twospots.com/web-articles/23/

    Thursday, May 24, 2007 11:45 PM
  • Thanks for the link guys.

    That google one was nice. Even though i know it earlier, but that link illustrates the concept with example and small pictures Smile good work bro.
    Friday, May 25, 2007 4:29 AM
  • Most welcome

    Friday, May 25, 2007 4:37 AM
  • @Adnan, That was a pretty informative link and quite illustrative and easy to grasp.

    However, I believe, Google has modified the Page Rank Algorithm a bit. I am trying to find more about it and shall post it as soon as I find a link, explaing the algorithm.

    Till that time, here is a food for everyone's thoughts, about Google's PAgerank Algorithm:
    "PageRank: Google's Original Sin"

    http://www.google-watch.org/pagerank.html
    Friday, May 25, 2007 6:48 AM
  • Yeah!! Here is the link to the modifications made to the PageRank Algorithm by Lawrence Page Himself:

    http://pr.efactory.de/e-further-factors.shtml
    Friday, May 25, 2007 6:52 AM
  • Fantastic link Arijit. Thanks!
    Friday, May 25, 2007 10:50 AM
  • man lots and lots of links are being posted in this forum. One now needs to choose what one wants to learn. During the start, there were less in this forum, so we could learn all we come across Stick out tongue but now as popularity is increasing (sadly to say during the end of the contest) resources, links, and information in this forums are increasing exponentially. Keep it up guys.
    Friday, May 25, 2007 11:51 AM
  • Good work Guys, keep it up...
    Friday, May 25, 2007 2:11 PM

All replies

  • Web designing is the are of designing website. In this, you can use combination of multiple scripting languages, unlike traditional programming languages.

    Moreover, the languages are called scripting languages because they are used to script a page of information.

    The most basic scripting language is HTML, which stands for Hyper-Text Markup Language. This language is interpreted by all the web-browsers.

    All the pages that we request on internet are converted into HTML, when they arrive at client side. The client side scripts may remain as it is. Client side scripts are written in JavaScript / VBScript.
    Sunday, April 15, 2007 8:27 PM
  • Start with the basics man. scripting and all are too high words to digest at this moment...
    Can you tell me how the coding for webs are done and how do they work...
    It is said that you dont need a compiler for web designing.. a notepad is enough...

    Also about the domains and how to register the site and all
    Sunday, April 15, 2007 8:35 PM
  • Ok Varun, I'm starting with something easy.

    I've already explained the meaning of scripting. So it should not be difficult for you to understand it.

    Now, regarding coding for webs, they are done in scripting languages. To create web pages / sites, you write those pages using combination of languages. Scripting languages permit your pages either to be dynamic or static.

    Static pages means those pages whose contents do not change over a period of time. Moreover, they represent constant information. e.g., check out

    http://mail.google.com/mail/help/terms_of_use.html

    That's a static page. Generally, the file extension of static pages is .htm / .html.

    Regarding dynamic pages, they are those pages which change frequently and the same page behaves differently for different values. For this, consider this forums site. Check out the address bar. For each new thread, only the PostID changes, and other values, more or less, remain same.


    Dynamic pages can have extension from a wide range of list. The extension generally depends of the language in which the page has been built.

    e.g.
    1. ASPX = ASP.NET Pages
    2. PHP = HyperText Pre Processor
    3. JSP = Java Server Pages
    4. CFM = Cold-Fusion Pages
    5. etc....
    Monday, April 16, 2007 5:01 AM
  • You can use Notepad as a general editor for all the web-pages. But for each language, there are different editors available in the market right now.

    e.g.
    1. MS Front Page = creating simple HTML Pages
    2. Visual Interdev = creating traditional ASP Pages
    3. MS Visual Web Developer = ASP.NET Pages Editor
    4. Dreamweaver = provides support for creating web-pages in multiple languages.
    5. and lot others to list.
    Monday, April 16, 2007 5:04 AM
  • Domains are the names allocated to a network that provide some services.

    e.g. microsoft.com is a domain that provides information and services pertaining to products of microsoft.

    For getting a domain registered, you need to contact domain registrar. There are many domain registrars available right now.

    e.g. Rediff, IndiaTimes, Web4India and lot many.

    On domains, you host your website. The websites can be hosted either on the server space or at your own place. If you opt for hosting your website on the server space, than for that, you need to pay money / rental to them. If you decide to host website at your own place, they you must have powerful high-end servers and a high bandwidth Internet Connection with static IP support.

    Here, the static IPs means those IP Addresses that do not change. Each website is mapped to a unique IP Address. Mostly, whenever you connect to Internet from home, you are allocated dynamic IP Address that changes each time you log on.
    Monday, April 16, 2007 5:12 AM
  • Thankz a lot man.. this is some piece of information... I didnt knew a lot of it..

    Start with the basic html coding then..
    Monday, April 16, 2007 3:48 PM
  • Hey Varun, here goes a sample very basic coding for the HTML. Copy the code and paste it into Notepad. Save it with some file name and with extension .HTM. Double Click this file and see the output in browser.

    Code Snippet

    <HTML>

        <HEAD>

           <TITLE>

              Welcome to HTML : See the Title Bar

           </TITLE>

        </HEAD>

         <BODY>
             This is the text.
              <B>Bold</B>
                <BR>
              This is after line break.
              <B><U><I> Check Text. It will be in Bold, Underline, Italics.
              </I></U></B>
        </BODY>
    </HTML>

    Monday, April 16, 2007 4:47 PM
  • Perfect example for beginners, sanket.
    Tuesday, April 17, 2007 1:17 AM
  • Looks like Sanket is going to teach us higher ends of the Web designing.. I found some stuff on Basics, which will cover a very ground level introduction to web-pages and websites...
    After that I think Sanket will also get a ground to teach us the actual designing...
    So here it goes...
    Tuesday, April 17, 2007 7:47 PM
  •  

    In this 'hands-on' module we will be building our first web page in no time. We just need to quickly cover a couple of points beforehand to help get our feet on the ground.

    The three ways you can build a web page

    1. Use a pre-made template: WHAT IS A WEB DESIGN TEMPLATE?

    A web site design template is a pre-made web designs which can be customized to reflect your company's branding. Website design templates can be found in various formats like Photoshop and HTML. Many times, these templates are compatible with HTML editors like GoLive, FrontPage, and Dreamweaver.

    Web site templates can be very useful; they can be used by experienced web designers to 'jump-start' the creation of a website. They are also a way for people to put out great looking web sites quickly with little or no knowledge of HTML and web design.

    2. Use an HTML editor like FrontPage or Dreamweaver:

    HTML editors make building web pages feel like (to a certain extent) creating a document in Microsoft Word ... it's made pretty easy. But the downside is that you lose a certain amount of control of what you're doing and in some cases become dependent on the program.

    3. Hand-code your HTML in a text editor like Notepad:

    That means you type in the HTML code yourself. This is the approach we are going to use here, because it's the quickest way to learn how to build web pages, and it is arguably the best way because you have the most control over what you're doing.

    Ok, now that we know the advantages of hand-coding web pages, let's jump into just the bare minimum of theory, then we will build our first web page!


    What are HTML tags?

    HTML tags are specifically formatted text that creates 'markers' for web browser to read and interpret. These 'markers' tell the web browser what and how to display things on the web page. Tags are placed in and around text and images (text and images are some of the 'things') that your want to have appear in your web pages.

    HTML has a whole bunch of tags (just like the alphabet has a whole bunch of letters) that the web designer can use to build web pages. As mentioned above, tags have a specific structure so that when the browser is reading an HTML page, it knows the tags from the normal text.

    Tags are typically words or abbreviations of words placed between angled brackets. So for example: to make text bold, HTML has the 'bold' tag that looks like this:

    <b> This text will be bolded </b>

    Another commonly used tag is the paragraph tag:

    <p>

    This is a paragraph of text.

    </p>

     

    Tuesday, April 17, 2007 7:51 PM
  •  

    Tag Diagram:

    You may have noticed that HTML tags come in pairs; HTML has both an opening tag (<tag name>) and a closing tag (</tag name >). The only difference between the opening and closing tags is that the closing tag contains an extra forward slash.

    some EXAMPLE HTML tags that might make things more clear:

    <b> Make text bold</b>

    <i> Makes text italic </i>

    <h1> Tells the browser that this text is very important - the browser usually makes this text really big </h1>

    <table> Creates an HTML table - think of a spreadsheet </table>

    I hope you can see the pattern in the list above.

    HTML tags are not just for placing and formatting text, HTML tags can be used to include other things like: animation, video, Flash, audio, and even multimedia programs.


    Comparing HTML code and the web page it creates

    Let's start with a very simple web page to make it as easy for you to understand. First lets look at the final page: sample web page

    Now that we've seen what the page looks like, let's look at the HTML code used to create the page.

    What you should do now is take a little time and compare the HTML page and the page with the code that is used to create the page. Notice where the tags are and what they are doing.

    SOME theory: the structure of an HTML page

    An HTML page is divided into two major sections:

    1. The body

    The body (<body>) section: this section contains all the stuff that appears on the actual web page when someone happens to come along with their web browser. We are talking about the actual text, images, flash movies, and so on that people will see. That, of course, means the tags used to format all this stuff are there too...

    2. The head

    The head (<head>) section contains underlying information about the page which does not get displayed in the web page (except for the title of the page). It does, however, have an affect on how the web page is displayed.

    You will notice that both the head and the body sections of a web site are marked in the HTML page with their respective tags: (<head> </head>) and (<body> </body>).

    If the body tag creates the body of an HTML page, and the head tag creates the head of an HTML page, how do you create an HTML page itself? You guessed it, use the HTML tags:

    <html> </html>

    The 'mother of all tags' is the HTML (<html>) tag, and like all tags it must have a start tag (<html>) and an end tag (</html>). The difference between the start and end tags is the forward slash (/), but you already knew that .

    Every web page MUST begin and end with the HTML tag, otherwise the web browser (programs like Internet Explorer) will not be able to display the page. You also have to have the head tags and the body tags. All the other tags are optional.

    So the bare-bones HTML page must have these tags and in this order:

    <html>

    <head>

    <title>Title of your page</title>

    </head>

    <body>

    </body>

    </html>

     

    Tuesday, April 17, 2007 7:57 PM
  • Time to build your first HTML page by hand

    I could go on with more theory and send half of you to sleep (trust me); instead you are now going to actually build your very first web page! One of the best ways to learn something is to actually do it, so don't worry if things are a little foggy for you right now, as we build the web page, things will start to clear up.

     

    Step 1: let's write some HTML code

    Open up a text editor like Notepad on Windows or SimpleText on the Macintosh and type this in:

    <html>

    <head>

    <title>Your first hand coded page!</title>

    </head>

    <body>

    <h2>Hand coding web pages is easy! </h2>

    <p>

    I would like to thank everyone who helped me type this page.

    </p>

    </body>

    </html>

    Step 2: save the file as an HTML document

    Save your HTML file (save it to your desktop so you will be sure to find it!) using your text editor's 'Save as' function and name the file webPage.html. You can choose any name you want, as long as you follow these 3 rules:

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->1.  <!--[endif]-->Web page names cannot have spaces in them: 'web page.html' is no good but 'webPage.html' is perfecto.

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->2.  <!--[endif]-->The name has to end with either .html or .htm; by ending the file name this way you are telling the computer that this is a web page and that it should use a web page reader / browser to view it.

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->3.  <!--[endif]-->Don't use funny symbol like: $, %, ^, & in your page names. Stick to standard letters and numbers.

    Step 3: Marvel at your work and view your page

    You should be able to now just double-click on the page or open it up with your web browser by going to its "File" menu, then select "Open file" and select your page.

    You should be able to see your page in all its glory! Ok, not too much glory, but it was your first hand-coded page after all! If you don't see anything, then compare what you typed with the original I gave you and just go over the process again. You will get it if you give yourself a chance!

    If you're not sure if what you created is looking like it's supposed to, you can check out the final page here and compare it with your own.

    Conclusion

    Now that we've built our first web page, we can now move on to building our first web site.

     

    Tuesday, April 17, 2007 8:01 PM
  • Now i have got lots of data on this.. let me know if all of you want me to post more.. Than we can disscuss out things over here....
    Tuesday, April 17, 2007 8:06 PM
  • dear SAnket your post is definitely all right but i think DOMAIN is reffered to as

    .com, .net, .edu etc and not as rediff and microsoft.

    Wednesday, April 18, 2007 7:19 PM
  • there are very few posts inthis forum
    which gives a ton of information like this..
    Wednesday, April 18, 2007 11:47 PM
  • Just To clear out the doubts of Kanav, I m posting the Web Designs Basics now....

    What is the web?

    In a nutshell, the web is a whole bunch on interconnected computers talking to one another. The computers (on the web) are typically connected by phone lines, digital satellite signals, cables, and other types of data-transfer mechanisms. A 'data-transfer mechanism' is a nerd's way of saying: a way to move information from point A to point B to point C and so on.

    The computers that make up the web can be connected all the time (24/7), or they can be connected only periodically. The computers that are connected all the time are typically called a 'server'. Servers are computers just like the one you're using now to read this article, with one major difference, they have a special software installed called 'server' software.

    What is the function of server software / programs?

    Server software is created to 'serve' web pages and web sites. Basically, the server computer has a bunch of web sites loaded on it and it just waits for people (via web browsers) to request or ask for a particular page. When the browser requests a page the server sends it out.

    How does the web surfer find a web site?

    The short answer is: by typing in the URL, or in other words, the web site address. So for example, if you wanted to find the web site http://www.killersites.com/, you would type in the address into your web browser's address bar or maybe use your 'favorites' or 'bookmarks' link to Killersites.

    There are other ways to find web sites (like search engines,) but behind the scenes web sites are all being found by going to the web site's official address. That brings us our last nerd detail: how does a website get an official address so that the rest of the web can find it?

    Registering your domain name

    If you ever wondered what the heck registering a domain was all about ... you probably figured it out by now! But just in case - registering a domain name gets you an official address for your web site on the World Wide Web. With this 'official' address, the rest of the web can find you.

    Like your home address is unique in the real world, there also can't be any duplicate addresses on the Internet, otherwise no one would know where to go! In other words, domain names are unique addresses on the web.

    Why does registering a domain name cost money?

    If you want to have your own unique address on the web, your own domain name, it will cost a few bucks for each year you want to 'own' the name. The cost of registering a domain name ranges from less than $10 USD to about $30 USD per year. You can register a domain from 1 to 10 years.

    The reason for the cost is that the central 'address book' of all the world's domain names needs to be updated - somebody's got to pay for that! You may have noticed that I just snuck in a little extra piece of information: the giant 'web address book' of domains.

    That leads us to our last bit of nerd information: when you type in a website's domain name or click on a link that takes you to that domain name, your browser starts asking servers where that particular domain name is sitting (on the web) and the servers are then able to tell the browser where to go by referring to the giant address book I mentioned above.


    Thursday, April 19, 2007 3:42 AM
  • Getting your web site 'live' on the Web

    With the nerd background details under our belts, we can now learn about the two steps to going live on the Web:

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->1.    <!--[endif]-->Register your domain.

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->2.    <!--[endif]-->Rent some server space.

    1. Registering your domain

    There are many companies out there that allow you to register the domain name for your web site. Prices vary, as does the quality of service, but at the end of the day, they all handle the details of getting your domain name listed in the giant address book I spoke about earlier.

    These days, you will find that many of the names you may be interested in registering are already taken. As I mentioned above, domain names have to be unique and many have been slurped up.

    What is the difference between .com, .net, .org, etc.?

    Practically speaking, there is really no difference these days. Search engines don't discriminate between a .COM address and a .NET address. The only thing you might consider is that people tend to type in .COM automatically since it was the first publicly known domain extension. So when registering a domain name, I would go for the .COM first and if it was taken, I would then try for any of the others. (.net, .org, .tv, etc. ...)

    You probably guessed; a .COM address is not the same domain name of the same name with a different extension.

    As such, each of the addresses can be registered separately.

    2. Renting server space to 'host' your web site

    You need to rent space on a server so that it can serve your web site to the World Wide Web; this is often called 'hosting'. Companies that provide this service are often called 'host' or hosting companies.

    After you've registered your domain, all you need to do is contact a hosting company and tell them your domain name. They will be able to guide you through the process and you should be live on the web in no time - typically within a week or less.

    Thursday, April 19, 2007 3:45 AM
  • A cheaper option

    Some people may not want to buy a domain or pay for hosting because they only have a personal web site for fun or practice. You can still get your website live on the web by using a free hosting service that allows you to create what is called a 'sub-domain'. A sub-domain is just a domain that is part of another domain. So if killersites.com offered sub-domain hosting you could have an address like:

    www.killersites.com/yourWebsite/

    Or it could be like:

    http://yourWebsite.killersites.com

    Whichever way the free hosting service decides to do it. The point is that your web site domain is really a part of the parent domain, in this case killersites.com. Doing it this way, you don't need to buy a domain name, and you don't need to pay for hosting.

    This is fine for fun or project websites, but if you are serious about your web site (say it's your business website) using sub-domains is like taking someone else's business card and writing your name on it! You figure it out ...

    One last point, I've heard of free hosting services that will allow you to host proper domains with them for free and without annoying ads that other free hosts will insert into your pages. But I've never used them, and in my opinion you always get what you pay for. In the internet's recent past there was once a crop of free service providers that would give away access to the web via dial-up, they were notorious for bad service and all have since gone bankrupt ... I wonder why?

    Moving your website files onto the server

    After you have your domain name registered and your hosting service in place, the last step is to upload the website onto the server. You can transfer your web site to your host's server using an FTP program.

    An FTP program is a type of software that is used to move files from one computer to another over the Internet. FTP is the acronym for: File Transfer Protocol; this just means that this is a 'way' of moving files.

    There are several free FTP programs you can use to move your files and many HTML editors and web design programs like Dreamweaver have FTP capabilities built in.

    One option you probably have to 'FTP' your files to the server is Internet Explorer. Internet Explorer 5 and up have an FTP program built right in. You can use it by typing in the FTP address of the server in the address bar preceded by the keyword: FTP. Here is an example:

    FTP://207.35.15.69/yourwebsite

    Thursday, April 19, 2007 3:51 AM
  • What no response???
    people please contribute.. ask questions.. i hv more stuff on this, but if no one is interested than i wont waste time posting stuff for myself only.....
    Sunday, April 22, 2007 2:41 AM
  • See Varun, the reason that you are not getting responses is that you are just concentrating on theory, and not on practical applications. The people here are more interested in learning practical things, rather then keep reading boring theories.

    It would be better if you start with practical examples. If you want, then I can start sharing my knowledge about website programming.
    Sunday, April 22, 2007 4:13 PM
  • Bro I m shouting at the top, "Please Give your contribution..."
    U dont need a invitation to do it.. i thought you were going to post good stuff, but all of a sudden you stopped posting, so i had to post the theory portion... Even i m new in this area.. I m just sharing the basic stuff that i found here and there.. you can give us the more practicle impact of the topic.. In between i can post some of theortical portions.. So just start posting..

    This is not only for Sanket , but all the people who have some stuff to share...
    Sunday, April 22, 2007 4:51 PM
  • Although you are shouting, but on my 1st post when I showed code, you replied that its getting bouncer.

    That's the reason for which I've seeked permission of yours. Wink
    Sunday, April 22, 2007 4:58 PM
  • hey!!

    want ur help??

    i m using google adsense in mah  blog...but they hav'nt confirmed it..

    waht more should  i  add in it  to make  full use of that

    Wednesday, April 25, 2007 7:34 PM
  • Sanket This is for you.. please do reply to the Akshat's Query.. Also explain how the searching works on website and what are the different ways we can have to search in out website???
    Thursday, April 26, 2007 2:56 AM
  • A website is just a bunch of web pages connected together through something called links. In HTML there is a special tag called (you guessed it!) the 'link' tag, and it looks like this in its most basic form:

    <a href="..."> </a>

    And here is an example of the link tag with a destination filled in:

    <a href=" http://www.killersites.com "> Go to killersites.com</a>

    It's safe to say that we have all used links when surfing the web. Whenever you click on a link that takes you to another page, you are using a link tag. The link tag is the most important tag in HTML; it makes the Internet interconnected!


    In the above example, we see that the link tag points to the web site www.killersites.com and the text that is displayed on the web page is: 'Go to killersites.com'. So if you wanted to create a link that took someone to www.yahoo.com, for example, you would replace the www.killersites.com with www.yahoo.com, Yahoo's address.

    Like all other tags, link tags have an opening tag (<a href=" http://www.killersites.com ">) and a closing tag (</a>). Links tags are a little more complex than the other tags we have seen so far, but I think that you can handle it!

    Some of you may have noticed that there is some text in the link tag that comes before the web site address; the text I am talking about is this:

    http://

    This text tells the browser that the link is pointing to a web page. Sometimes links can point to other things besides web pages; things like movies, PDF files, and so on.

    Absolute vs. Relative URL

    To link pages in your web site from one page to the next you have a choice of using one of two types of addresses: absolute addresses (complete) and relative addresses (partial).

    Before I go on, URL is a nerd's way of saying 'address'.

    An absolute URL is the complete address of a page that can be found from any other location on the Internet. So let's say you have a page called contact.html on the root of your web site who's domain name is www.myStore.com . In this case, the absolute URL of the contact.html page would be:

    'http://www.myStore.com/contact.html'

    Ok, now I know I lost a few people because I used a word that I did not explain: 'root'.

    When geeks talk about the root of a web site, they are taking about the base of the web site, the starting level.

    The files (pages, images, etc.) that make up your web site are organized in folders just like any other files that you store on your home computer. Your host will give you a space/directory on their server for you to place all your website's files.

    This space/folder assigned to you will be the 'root' of your web site. This means that as far as the Internet is concerned, anything (html files, images, other folders, etc.) in this folder is directly accessible by your domain name plus the name of the item. Huh! Even I'm a little confused! Perhaps a little example will explain this better:

    Let's say that on the root level of your website, you had these HTML files:

    index.html and contact.html

    And in a folder called 'products', you placed whole bunch of other pages with one called 'bookcases.html'. You decided to put all your 'product' HTML pages into a 'products' folder to keep the web site more organized - a smart thing to do!

    Sunday, April 29, 2007 1:01 PM

  • Can you guess what the absolute URL would be for the web page 'bookcases.html'? For the domain name: 'www.myStore.com' it would be:

    http://www.myStore.com/products/bookcases.html

    Just think about it a little and hopefully it will sink in! If it doesn't right away, don't worry, it will come.

     
    RELATIVE URLS

    A relative URL is a partial address that is relative to the page where you placed your link. So if you were linking from the index.html page of this web site to the bookcases.html page your relative URL (address) would be:

    /products/bookcases.html

    And the actual link tag would look like this:

    <a href="/products/bookcases.html">Check out our bookcases!</a>

    You are basically telling the browser that the HTML page we want to load is in the products folder. Play around with links and folders on your own web site and things will become very clear. This is important because if you get the address wrong, it won't load!

    Ok, one more example to help you guys and gals out there: lets say you wanted to link to the page 'contact.html' from the 'index.html' page:

    <a href="contact.html">Contact us</a>

    Since the page 'contact.html' is on the same level as the page 'index.html', we need only include the name of the html file in the link address.

    Summary of the process of creating a web site

    Now that we got some preliminary theory out of the way (it's about time,) we can actually go over the 10 steps you'll need to take to build and bring a website 'live' on the World Wide Web.

    1. Define the purpose of the web site

    When starting a web site project, you must first clarify what the goals of the website are. Knowing your goals will impact the choices you make when putting the web site together and ultimately contribute to its success or failure.

    This may sound obvious, but many web sites seemed to have been put together without the goal kept in mind. The result is a messy web site that is disorganized and harder to build and maintain.

    So if, for example, the goal is to create an e-commerce web site that sells products, then as a web site designer you have to consider things like the following:

    1. Do you need credit card processing capabilities?
    2. Are you going to need a shopping cart system to take orders?
    3. How many items will be sold on the web site?

    This is just one example. The point to take away is that by defining the purpose you can better prepare and get the right tools / people for the job.

    2. Diagram the structure of the website.

    A simple diagram helps to visualize the web site for both you and your client - this assuming someone has hired you to build a website. Nothing special is really needed, just a series of boxes representing each page in the site with lines connecting them showing the linking strategy. A pyramid scheme is usually used to show the hierarchy of a web site from the splash/home page down*.

    Sunday, April 29, 2007 1:03 PM

  • 3. Write out the text for the web site

    Before you start writing any HTML, you should (in your favorite word processor) write out all the text that you need to include in the website. Doing so will help you with the design process.

    Another thing you should do is to make sure that the text is finalized before it gets to the web site; it is much easier to correct things in a word processor than in an HTML page.




    4. Choose a basic layout that will be used on all pages

    Armed with your website diagram and your web site's text (complete text!) you can now choose a basic layout for your pages. You can go crazy with some funky artsy web site (and sometimes it can work), but most of the time you should use standard layouts that people are used to:

    1. Left side navigation.
    2. Top navigation
    3. Right side navigation.

    When in doubt, think of how books are laid out.

    5. Choose the basic color scheme and fonts for the site

    Your next task is to start considering the basic colors and fonts that you're going to use. You want to choose a style that fits the subject of the web site. For example: pink doesn't do well for a hardware store, maybe some steel blues instead! The point to take away is to establish the style of the web site before you start creating pages, otherwise you may find yourself doing pages over again!

    Later on in this tutorial I will teach you how to use an easy to use technology that makes web sites a breeze to style: CSS

    Sunday, April 29, 2007 1:05 PM

  • 6. Build out the website

    With the before-mentioned completed, you're ready to actually start creating your web pages. So what you need to do is:

    1. Take the structure you developed in steps 1 to 5 to create your web pages.
    2. Link the web pages together.

    Now is the time for you to practice a little and actually build a small web site! If you can't think of something, create one on your favorite movie with a page for each main character.

    Remember that you only get good at doing something by doing it!



    7. Choose a domain name

    Once your website is built, you will need to get it on the web - that means you need a domain name.

    All websites need a domain name, and your choice of a domain name can impact on how many people find iyour website, so choose carefully! Here are some points to remember when considering your choice of a domain name:

    1. Domain names that tell you something about the web site are food for search engines and they help clue people in, too. If for example you were building a website for a hardware store, a domain name like 'discountHardware.com' is pretty good, it tells you everything about the web site immediately. If you called it 'bigSteel.com' instead, you can argue that we are not giving such a clear message of what the web site is about. Even if the hardware store was actually called 'Big Steel Hardware', I would go with 'discountHardware.com'.
    2. Search engines such as Google will look at several elements of your web site to try and determine what your website is about. One of those key elements is the domain name; Google will look for keywords in the domain name that help the 'Google bot' (Google's automated snooper software) to categorize your web site.

    One question that is asked often enough is whether the domain name has to have the same name as the business it is representing - the answer is no.


    Sunday, April 29, 2007 1:07 PM

  • 8. Register your domain name

    This can be trickier than you think, since many of the good domain names are taken. You can pretty much forget about single-word domain names like business.com and auctions.com; they are long gone! You will need to come up with combination words like 'how-to-build-websites.com'.



    Today you have many more options for domains; in the past, businesses could only register .com's because .net and .org domains where reserved for special types of organizations. Those old restrictions are now gone, and there are a wide variety of extensions you can choose from:

    .com, .net, .org, .tv, .biz, and several others including country codes like .ca (Canada), .us (USA), .co.uk (United Kingdom) et cetera.

    In terms of the search engines, it makes no difference which ending (extension) you use.

    Some people might argue that the first thing you need to do is to register your domain name, then build your web site. That may be true if your website design is impacted by the domain ... for some people this is the case, and for others it isn't. You can make that call for your own websites.

    How do you know if a domain is already taken?

    The quickest way to figure this out is to type in the domain name in your browser and see if it takes you anywhere. This is not always useful though because many domains have been bought but have no website!

    That means the best way to figure this out is to go to your registrar. Every registrar will have a form where you can check to see if domains names are available just by typing it in.

    The best thing about going to the registrar is that when you type in a domain name you are interested in their systems will not only tell you if the .com is available, they will also give you the scoop on all the other variations - a big time saver.

    9. Find a hosting company: what to look for in A hosT

    Today, hosting web sites cost much less than what they did just a few years ago, and that's a good thing. You can go from zero cost hosting to very pricey solutions, depending on your web site's needs.

    What can affect the cost of hosting a website?

    • Traffic - more traffic can cost you more per month. But for this to affect you, you would have to have a pretty popular web site. Since you are just starting out, I wouldn't expect that problem for a while.
    • Extra features / services - you may need to use a database (for e-commerce) or need many email accounts, extra disk space to store all your websites files. Each host will have a list of plans that you can choose from depending on your needs.

    In the end you have to choose the hosting company and hosting plan that is best suited to for your web site. Cheaper is not always best, but it may be good enough for you.

    10. Upload your website to the hosting company's server

    Once you created your web site, paid for your domain name, and picked your hosting company, it's time to upload the web site onto your host server for the world to see. Typically, you would use something called FTP to do this; you hosting company should be able to help you with the details when setting up your account.



    Sunday, April 29, 2007 1:09 PM
  • Guys this are some of the priceless information that i m posting.. show your support for more such stuff.. and please contribute...

    Some quick tips to remember

    1. Keeping web pages small - under 60k
    2. Keeping content headers (H2 tags) clear and to the point.
    3. Keep paragraphs small.
    4. Keep contact information (email - phone) easily found in same place on all pages.
    5. Keep look and structure of the web pages consistent across all pages.
    6. Provide a 'Home' button to take the user back to the cover (a.k.a.: splash, home) page of the website.
    7. Make sure links are always underlined. (Don't use CSS to remove the underline: big mistake if you do since people assume that underlined texts are links.)
    8. The company logo should appear on every page in the same spot and it should always be a link back to the home page.

    Sunday, April 29, 2007 1:11 PM
  • Anyone out there... I  m still waiting for replies...
    Tuesday, May 1, 2007 3:05 AM
  • hi varun,

    Its my turn to put some stuff.

     

    --Use images as least as possible.

    --Most appropriate image files used are GIF, PNG, JPEG

    --Images of small size.

    --We can use flash contents in our web pages for animation, advertisement etc.

     

    Now a days flash files are seen in most of the websites as they are giving higer resolutions to the contents.

    Tuesday, May 1, 2007 6:21 PM
  • Thankz for the contribution buddy.. just keep them coming in... waiting for more...
    Wednesday, May 2, 2007 2:58 AM
  • hi , i had uploaded a whitepaper, regarding what we are discussing now, so please have a look at it and i am sure that the whitepaper will be helpful to a great extent to all those interested in web designing. afterall, you can gain points if you download to read the whitepaper?

    note: pls rate the whitepaper, if you like it or if  u r downloading it

     

    http://studentrockstar.cybage.com/studrockstar/WhitePaperFiles/webdesignbook.pdf

     

    thanks

     

    Wednesday, May 2, 2007 8:39 PM
  •  

    We can use a background picture for web page instead of background color. You must have a

    ready image file in .gif or .jpg formats. Now you must extend <BODY> tag as below. "image1.gif"

    is file name of he image we want to use as background image.

     

    <BODY BACKGROUND="image1.gif">

     

    Example :

    <HTML>

    <HEAD>

    <TITLE>Page with background image</TITLE>

    </HEAD>

    <BODY BACKGROUND="image1.gif">

    <B>Page with background image.</B>

    </BODY>

    </HTML>

     

    *Image file must be in the same folder as your html file. Otherwise browser will not be able to find

      it.

    Saturday, May 5, 2007 7:23 PM
  • Hi everybody,

    I have done a lot of freelance web designing so i have some basic knowledge about HTML. I want to share my experiences, and if anybody has any questions, feel free to ask...

    We have all seen how to create basic pages, and some of the popular tags used. We were discussing about reducing the page size, thereby making pages load faster. Here are a couple of things you should keep in mind.

    1. Images - Try to convert images of smaller size like gif. Please note that this will reduce the quality of the image. But if done correctly using the proper tools like Macromedia Fireworks, this will help you make pages load faster a lot.

    2. Flash - Reduce the amount of flash animations.

    3. Rollover Effect - The change of an image, when you move the mouse over it is called Rollover effect. A lot of WYSIWYG editors allow you to provide the images and it will create the rollover effects for you without writing a single line of code.

    What i suggest is, use CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) to mimic the same effects without use of the images.

     

    If you want to know more about CSS, please let me know. I can also teach a lot of cool stuff like playing around scripts, optimizing pages for cross-browser and cross-resolutio compatibility. If you are all interested i can even teach you SEO (Search Engine optimization) for managing your search ranking in many search engines like Google and Windows Live Search.

     

    Waiting for your comments,

     

    Adnan

     

    Saturday, May 5, 2007 8:32 PM
  • Thatz good Adnan, you dont need a invitation, just keep them coming in.. we are learning a lot here.. and thankz for sharing the information with us..
    So just keep the stuff rolling in....
    Sunday, May 6, 2007 4:32 AM
  • Ok lets start with the basics. The explanation of the code used is given in the webpage istelf. If you still have any more questions, please let me know...

    Note: Copy the code on the notepad and save it as <"testpage.html"> with the quotation marks.


     

    Code Snippet

    <html>
    <head>
    <title>My first HTML page</title>
    </head>

    <body>
    <h1>Welcome to HTML tutorial</h1>
    <h2>Welcome to HTML tutorial</h2>
    <h3>Welcome to HTML tutorial</h3>
    <h4>Welcome to HTML tutorial</h4>
    <h5>Welcome to HTML tutorial</h5>
    <h6>Welcome to HTML tutorial</h6>
    <hr />
    This was a horizontal line
    <hr/>
    <p>This is a new paragraph. The paragraph tag starts with &lt;p&gt; and ends with &lt;/p&gt;. You can use attributes to define how paragraph look like.</p>
    <hr />
    <b>This text is bold. You can use the &lt;b&gt; tag, or &lt;strong&gt; tag instead. </b>
    <hr/>
    <em>This text is italic, using &lt;em&gt; tag. </em>
    <hr/>
    <blockquote>This text has been indented using &lt;blockquote&gt; tag. Its like using the Tab key in Microsoft Word.</blockquote>
    <hr/>
    The underlined text is a <a href="#">hyperlink</a>. A hyperlink is a link which allows us to go to another page. We ue the anchor tag to make hyperlinks. The anchor tag is used by &lt;a&gt; and the attribute used for hyperlink is href.
    <hr/>
    <h3>Congragulations, you have now learned to use the basic tags of HTML. In the next lesson we will study some more tags and how we can set attributes to it. Happy Learning :) !!!</h3>
    </body>
    </html>

     

     Waiting for your feedback!

    Sunday, May 6, 2007 10:58 AM
  • Nice one buddy.. waiting for some more advance Tags...
    Sunday, May 6, 2007 11:26 AM
  • Lets look at some essential tags we will use for making webpages.

     

    Code Snippet

    <html>
    <head>
    <title>Lesson 2</title>
    </head>
    <body>
    <h3>Creating an ordered list</h3>
    <ol>
      <li>List item 1</li>
      <li>List item 2</li>
      <li>List item 3</li>
    </ol>
    <hr/>
    <h3>Creating a bullet list</h3>
    <ul>
      <li>List item 1</li>
      <li>List item 2</li>
      <li>List item 3</li>
    </ul>
    <hr/>
    <h3>Mathematical Tags</h3>
    Superscript : abcd<sup>efgh</sup> <br/>
    Subscript : abcd<sub>efgh</sub> <br/>
    <hr/>
    <h3>Special Characters :</h3>
    &copy; <br/>
    &reg; <br/>
    &#8482; <br/>
    &pound; <br/>
    &yen; <br/>
    &#8364; <br/>
    &#402;
    <hr/>
    <h3>Scrolling text</h3>
    <marquee direction="left">
    This text is moving left becuase direction is set to left
    </marquee>
    <br/>
    <marquee direction="right">
    This text is moving right becuase direction is set to right
    </marquee>
    </body>
    </html>

     

    Sunday, May 6, 2007 2:34 PM
  •  Varun_Modi_a59ed9 wrote:
    Nice one buddy.. waiting for some more advance Tags...

    exactly, even m waiting for some advancd tags, somebody please post if they know some good ones....

     

    @adnan....nice list there...

    Sunday, May 6, 2007 10:02 PM
  • Lets play around with tables which are very important for proper layout of the website. There are tons of attributes, you can use. Experiment and let me know the results.

     

    Code Snippet
    <html>
    <head>
    <meta'>http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
    <head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" />
    <title>Untitled Document</title>
    </head>
    <body>
    <h3>Tables, divs and colors</h3>
    <table width="100%" border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0">
      <tr>
        <td>To make a table, use the &lt;table&gt; tag. You can make rows with the &lt;tr&gt; tag and colums with the &lt;td&gt; tag within the table tag. </td>
      </tr>
    </table>
    <br/>
    <table bgcolor="CYAN" width="100%">
      <tr>
        <td>Background Color can be set using the bgcolor=&quot;COLOR&quot; attribute </td>
      </tr>
    </table>
    <br/>
    <table bordercolor="RED" border="1" width="100%">
      <tr>
        <td>Border color can be set using the bordercolor=&quot;COLOR&quot; attribute along with the border=&quot;NUMBER&quot; atribute to define the thickness of the border. </td>
      </tr>
    </table>
    <br/>
    <table width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" >
      <tr>
        <td>You can also use the cellpadding=&quot;NUMBER&quot; and cellspacing=&quot;NUMBER&quot; attributes to define the spacing and the padding between the cells of the table.</td>
      </tr>
    </table>
    <p>
    <div align="center">This text is inside a div tag</div>
    </p>
    <p><span style="color:BLUE; background-color:RED; border: GREEN dashed thin; text-align: center;">We can use the style tag to set different attributes of text, tables, border and a lot of other things.</span></p>
    <table width="100%" border="1" bordercolor="BLACK">
      <tr>
        <td>Row - 1 ; Column - 1 ; </td>
        <td>Row - 1 ; Column - 2 ;</td>
        <td>Row - 1 ; Column - 3 ;</td>
        <td>Row - 1 ; Column - 4 ;</td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td>Row - 2 ; Column - 1 ;</td>
        <td>Row - 2 ; Column - 2 ;</td>
        <td>Row - 2 ; Column - 3 ;</td>
        <td>Row - 2 ; Column - 4 ;</td>
      </tr>
    </table>
    </body>
    </html>

     


    If you have any questions, please feel free to ask me. Waiting for your feedback.

    Tuesday, May 8, 2007 7:22 AM
  • Nice work Adnan, due to exams i m not able to be so active, but please go on, I will mark your posts as a reply from my side... and will contribute more after a week...
    Tuesday, May 8, 2007 11:55 AM
  • Thanks for the encouragement Varun. But i want this learning process to be an interactive one. This way, everybody including me can learn a lot of new things. Anway, i'll keep posting even if theres only a single person who's benefiting....
    Tuesday, May 8, 2007 1:58 PM
  • Good thread fro web development learners Smile

    Nice one....
    Wednesday, May 9, 2007 9:16 AM
  • In this lesson we will study about style classes. Once you are clear with the fundamentals of this session, then creating stylesheets will be a breeze. Stylesheets allow you to define generic properties which can be used throughout the website maintaining consistency, and less code on your part. Enough about the theory, lets do the practical.

     

    Code Snippet

    <html>
    <head>
    <title>Stylesheet class</title>
    <style type="text/css">
    <!--
    .border{
     border: solid black 1px;
     background-color: white;
    }
    .redtext{
     font-family: Verdana;
     background-color: white;
     color: red;
    }
    .bluetext{
     font-family: Geneva;
     color: blue;
     background-color: white;
    }
    .hyperlink{
     color: #CC6600;
     font-family: Verdana;
     background-color: white;
    }
    a.hyperlink
    {
     color: #cc6600;
     font-family: Verdana;
     background-color: white;
    }
    a.hyperlink:link{
     text-decoration: underline;
    }
    a.hyperlink:hover{
     color: red;
     text-decoration: none;
    }
    a.hyperlink:visited{
     color: blue;
     text-decoration: line-through;
    }
    p{
     font: Arial;
     color: green;
     background-color: white;
     text-decoration: underline;
    }
    -->
    </style>
    </head>
    <body>
    <table width="100%" class="border">
      <tr>
        <td class="bluetext">This text will appear blue because of the bluetext class assigned to the td tag</td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td class="redtext">This text will appear red with a different font becase of the redtext class applied to this td tag </td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td class="hyperlink">This text will take the properties of the hyperlink class. Try clicking the following link:<br/>
        <br/><a href="#" class="hyperlink">HYPERLINK TO ANOTHER PAGE</a></td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td>These classes can be applied to any element. The same classes can be defined for the tags itself. For example look at the text in the p tag :</td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td><p>This text will take the properties of the p tag.</p></td>
      </tr>
    </table>
    </body>
    </html>

     

    Wednesday, May 9, 2007 3:23 PM
  • Hello everyone, I hope that the tutorials so far have been helpful in learning HTML. There are a lot of other topics we can cover like, CSS, Search engine optimization, etc. Please let me know, what would like to learn next.
    Monday, May 14, 2007 1:16 AM
  • Yes adnan this thread has been good. I think you can try about some XML, XSL and XSD. if you dont got much idea about it, then CSS will just do fine Wink

    Best of luck m8.
    Monday, May 14, 2007 3:26 AM
  • try www.w3schools.com
    Monday, May 14, 2007 5:43 AM
  •  Adnan_Hussain_b89496 wrote:
    Hello everyone, I hope that the tutorials so far have been helpful in learning HTML. There are a lot of other topics we can cover like, CSS, Search engine optimization, etc. Please let me know, what would like to learn next.

    surely adnan, it was definitely useful, .... i think SEO, is the current trend, you can start with that...

    Monday, May 14, 2007 8:20 PM
  • In this tutorial, we will learn about using CSS. Lets look at some theory.

    CSS is an external file which store element information in an external file, rather than the web page itself. This way, all you have to do, is just include the file in all your webpages and start using it. The advantage is that, it will reduce the amount of code you will have to write for each web page and by using CSS you can maintain consistency throughout your website.

    If you are new to CSS, i suggest you use TopStyle Lite (free) for learning all the different attributes available.

     

    NOTE: Please save this file as stylesheet.css (you can have any filename)

    /* CSS Document */
    body{
     margin: 10px;
     background-color: white;
     border: dotted black 2px;
    }

    .blacktext{
     color: black;
     font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
     font-style: normal;
     font-size: medium;
     font-weight: lighter;
    }

    .redtext{
     color: red;
     font-family: Geneva, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
     font-style: italic;
     font-size: 16px;
     font-weight: bolder;
     word-spacing: 4px;
     line-height: 24px;
     text-align: left;
    }

    li{
     list-style-type: circle;
     list-style-position: outside;
    }

    table{
     color: green;
     font-family: "Courier New", Courier, monospace;
     font-size: small;
     border: dashed green 2px;
     text-align: center;
    }

    #list
    {
     list-style-type: square;
     font-family: "Times New Roman", Times, serif;
     font-size: small;
    }

    .link
    {
     color: red;
     font-family: serif;
     font-size: small;
    }

    a.link
    {
     color:red;
     font-family: serif;
     font-size: small;
    }

    a.link:hover
    {
     color: blue;
     font-size: medium;
    }

     

     

    NOTE: Please save this file in the same directory as the css file, or change the path in the link tag.
    <html>
    <head>
    <title>CSS tutotrial</title>
    <link href="stylesheet.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
    </head>
    <body>
    <p class="redtext">This text will appear in red as i am using the redtext class from the css. Try changing some of the attributes to notice in the difference</p>
    <p class="blacktext">This text will appear in balck. Please note that for applying the style, you need to use the class attribute. This is possible if your class preceeds with the . symbol </p>
    <table width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0">
      <tr>
        <td><p>Since i have set the style for the table tag directly (without preceeding the class with .) This stylesheet will be applied to all the tables throughout the webpage</p>    </td>
      </tr>
    </table>
    <ul>
      <li>I have also changed the list style. of the li tag</li>
      <li>You can even have an image, apart from the predefined list-type's</li>
    </ul>
    <p>&nbsp;</p>
    <ul>
      <li id="list">You can also define identifier's</li>
      <li id="list">This is applied by using the id attribute</li>
      <li id="list">This is possible if you write the class name preceeding with the # symbol</li>
    </ul>
    For more information about CSS, please visit the following <a class="link" href="http://www.w3schools.com/css/css_reference.asp">link</a>
    </body>
    </html>

     


     

    Tuesday, May 15, 2007 7:05 AM
  • Thanks @Adnan.
    Tuesday, May 15, 2007 8:24 AM
  • Nice one Adnan.. this stuff really helps a lot.. just keep them coming in...
    Tuesday, May 15, 2007 9:02 AM
  • adnan, nice of you to share info about CSS....do keep posting such meaningful and helpful contents
    Tuesday, May 15, 2007 7:17 PM
  • Thank you for the encouragement everyone. It gives me immense pleasure to know, that my help is appreciated.

    Well, now that we are familiar with the basics of HTML, its tags, CSS and some of the common used attributes. Lets look at meta tags. These tags are important for various reasons. These tags help Search Engines know what the webpage is about, some of the keywords that will help search and index your wbpage(s), author information, HTML standard used, etc.

    So let the fun begin.

    Please use this code before the <body> tag.
    <HTML LANG=en-US>
    <HEAD>
    <TITLE>Welcome to the HTML meta tag tutorial</TITLE>
    <META NAME="keywords" CONTENT="tutorial,meta,tag,search,index,HTML">
    <META NAME="description" CONTENT="This tutorial aims to understand the syntax, attributes, available formats and the importance of meta tags in web pages.">
    <META NAME="copyright" CONTENT="MSDN">
    <META NAME="author" CONTENT="Adnan Rashid">
    <META NAME="robots" CONTENT="FOLLOW,INDEX">
    </HEAD>

     The keywords, allow the search engines to get a basic idea, what the page is about.
    The description tag, is the text you will see below the website name in the search results, giving the viewers more information about the page.
    The copyright and author attributes indentify the owner and creator of the webpage.
    The robots tag, indicates the permission for spiders (application to search for web pages by search engines. Also referred as bots) to crawl the webpage.
    You can also use the meta refresh tag to redirect the browser to a different page.
    <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="10;url=http://www.microsoft.com">
    This will instruct to refresh the webpage every 10 seconds. The url mentions the page, which the browser should redirect to.
    If the url is not specified the page will only refresh.
    Happy coding!!!
    Tuesday, May 15, 2007 9:23 PM
  • hey adnan, i must say that its a good summary of the meta tag....well one query just came to my mind...assuming that a user while designing his, web pages, does not include meta tag, then will his site be scanned by the spiders? and will be displayed in the results?

     

     

    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 9:48 AM
  • Interesting question Anoop. For search engines to successfully crawl your website, you will need meta tags. Having meta tags, will not only help search engines crawl your homepage, but also will inform them about the unique content of each and every page, thus helping in getting better search results.

    An alternative but not as effective way, it to make sitemaps. For example you can make a sitemap for Google using Coffee cup Simteap builder, and submit it to the Google webmaster tools.

    This technique is better than manually submitting your website to search engines, as it increases the search index rank.

     

    I will also have a tutorial about Search Engine Optimization soon...

    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 10:05 AM
  • This is really good information buddy. thankz a lot for it.. just keep them coming...

    But I have one question... if you dont include the meta tag for giving permission to the robots.. then your page is not their in the search engine???

    and how do you submit or declare it to a search engine that your webpage is up and ready to be indexed by the engine???
    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 11:42 AM
  • Let more of them coming Wink

    Its really awesome info in good level of details.
    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 12:06 PM
  • @Varun. Having meta tags, on your webpages is not enough. The spiders should know that your website exists. The best way to do this is to submit a Google Sitemap to the Google Webmaster tools.

    Another possible solutions is that a website which links to your website is crawled. This way the spider finds your website and starts crawling it.

    The basic idea is, somebody or something(website) should direct the spider to your website, otherwise it wont know your website exists....

    Hope this answers your question.

    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 2:27 PM
  • Lets look at some tools which will ease web development.

    The current market has many WYSIWYG editors. These tools reduce the amount of code the designer has to write. The most popular being Dreamweaver. Another great tool available is Microsoft Expression Web.

    Knowing HTML and using these designers is not enough. You will need to have basic knowledge of image editing and manipulation. There are many softwares for image editing. The best of these tools is PhotoShop but it has a high learning curve, is very difficult for beginners, but is the most effective. Other tools include, Fireworks and PhotoImpact.

    If you are a beginner with CSS, i highly recommend Bradsoft TopStyle Pro.

    If you know of a good software, please share with us...

    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 3:36 PM
  • Good info my friend. I know i cant contribute much cause i dont have much info about it. But i am learning a lot from this thread Smile Thanks guys, keep it going.
    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 3:51 PM
  • Thankz Adnan.. that surely answered my question
    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 4:43 PM
  • Glad to be of help my friend.
    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 4:52 PM
  • @adnan - thanks for the info about the meta tags and clearing my doubt,,,,,,well about thw WYSIWYG editors, i think coffeecup html editor is good for beginners who are trying out web development using html, also microsoft frontpage, used along with microsoft publisher, works wonders....but these are very static web page creation...

    does anybody know of editors that allow, to create client server interactions and dynamic web pages...??

    Friday, May 18, 2007 1:06 PM
  • Hey Adnan, while trying to learn about Drupal CMS, I was hearing a lot about the meta tag module, but was not able to understand it before, now i know its use...

    Also can you tell me what is static pages and dynamic pages.....
    Friday, May 18, 2007 2:57 PM
  • @Varun. There are a lot of different definitions of static and dynamic pages in different contexts.

    Statis pages are just used to display information. Dynamic pages, have forms and other interactive elements, which allow input from users. This form may be handled by a mechanism like CGI (common gateway interface) and is stored in some database of format like XML.

    Hope this answers your question...

    Friday, May 18, 2007 5:49 PM
  • Ohh, now i understand.. now i will try to find the way of creating dynamic pages in drupal... thanks for the explanation...
    Friday, May 18, 2007 6:27 PM
  • @Anoop. What type of dynamic features are you looking for? If you want something like a form, which you want to be emailed to you, then you will need to use CGI and handle the form with a perl script. If you want to make the pages more interactive, you can use javascripts. Tons of free js are available at http://www.dynamicdrive.com .

    Friday, May 18, 2007 7:49 PM
  • HI varun

    if you really want to learn this web designing

    then start firstlw with html basics  then javascript

    then decide whether you want to move to .Net side or j2ee side

    Saturday, May 19, 2007 6:06 AM
  • Very good resourceful thread. Keep it up guys. I am learning a lot from this thread. Please dont stop it, let me continue Smile
    Saturday, May 19, 2007 4:49 PM
  • Yes Prashant, to build web applications we can use either .net or java. But html will not be enough. If you are looking at the .net side, you wil need to code in visual basic/c#. You will also need some basic knowledge of sql to bind data.

    If you look at the java side, you will need knowledge of JSF(Java Server Faces) to build DAL(Data Abstraction Layer) for applications, jsp and applets. In short, fundamental of almost all the concepts in J2EE.

    I am a .net fan. If somebody wants to build a dynamic application, i suggest you to view some of the videos on http://www.asp.net and http://www.learnvisualstudio.com . http://www.w3schools.com is a fantastic place to learn new web technologies. Building .net applications is easy, using the 2.0 framework with almost all the control ready to be used and with thew power of AJAX, you will be amazed at what you can create.

    The opportuites are endless!!!

    Saturday, May 19, 2007 9:58 PM
  • Monday, May 21, 2007 10:57 AM
  •  Adnan_Hussain_b89496 wrote:

    @Anoop. What type of dynamic features are you looking for? If you want something like a form, which you want to be emailed to you, then you will need to use CGI and handle the form with a perl script. If you want to make the pages more interactive, you can use javascripts. Tons of free js are available at http://www.dynamicdrive.com .

    hi adnan, by dynamic content i mean, forms, content that changes based on users options and info...so i ws just looking for any ditors which do these jobs?

    Monday, May 21, 2007 11:31 AM
  • Since we have all discussed Search Engine optimization, lets look at Google's page rank in detail.

    For those of you who are unfamiliar, Google has made the concept of PG to understand the importance of your page on the internet. In a simple explanation, the more pages that are linked to you, the more is the importance of your webpage and the more PG you will have. Heres and article...

    http://www.twospots.com/web-articles/23/

    Thursday, May 24, 2007 11:45 PM
  • Thanks for the link guys.

    That google one was nice. Even though i know it earlier, but that link illustrates the concept with example and small pictures Smile good work bro.
    Friday, May 25, 2007 4:29 AM
  • Most welcome

    Friday, May 25, 2007 4:37 AM
  • @Adnan, That was a pretty informative link and quite illustrative and easy to grasp.

    However, I believe, Google has modified the Page Rank Algorithm a bit. I am trying to find more about it and shall post it as soon as I find a link, explaing the algorithm.

    Till that time, here is a food for everyone's thoughts, about Google's PAgerank Algorithm:
    "PageRank: Google's Original Sin"

    http://www.google-watch.org/pagerank.html
    Friday, May 25, 2007 6:48 AM
  • Yeah!! Here is the link to the modifications made to the PageRank Algorithm by Lawrence Page Himself:

    http://pr.efactory.de/e-further-factors.shtml
    Friday, May 25, 2007 6:52 AM
  • Fantastic link Arijit. Thanks!
    Friday, May 25, 2007 10:50 AM
  • man lots and lots of links are being posted in this forum. One now needs to choose what one wants to learn. During the start, there were less in this forum, so we could learn all we come across Stick out tongue but now as popularity is increasing (sadly to say during the end of the contest) resources, links, and information in this forums are increasing exponentially. Keep it up guys.
    Friday, May 25, 2007 11:51 AM
  • Good work Guys, keep it up...
    Friday, May 25, 2007 2:11 PM
  • Abosolutely guys. I have an idea, why dont we start a thread for .net 2.0? We can discuss about creating master pages, user controls, sitemaps, AJAX and lot of other stuff...
    Friday, May 25, 2007 5:22 PM
  • I think people are not much experienced with these topics. I know quite much about .net, but not that much that i can start teaching others Sad

    Once i get to learn more, ill surely start a thread. But i guess if anyone knows, then they should start a thread for it.
    Friday, May 25, 2007 5:55 PM
  • Thatz right.. I m not capable for understanding those stuffs right now.. I think that if you are learning something completely new.. like max i know till now is C++, for .net I will need a more proffessional help. I wont be able to learn it on forums.. but if there is something parallel to what i know, its easy to grasp and forums are best for it....

    But i think there are lot of people who would talk about .net, so a thread on it will be good.. But i think MS already has a special forums for .net and all, try looking their... you will get a international support their...
    Friday, May 25, 2007 7:01 PM
  • It is essential to define the purpose of the website as one of the first steps in the planning process. A purpose statement should show focus based on what the website will accomplish and what the users will get from it. A clearly defined purpose will help the rest of the planning process as the audience is identified and the content of the site is developed. Setting short and long term goals for the website will help make the purpose clear and plan for the future when expansion, modification, and improvement will take place. Setting a goal practices and measurable objectives should be identified to track the progress of the site and determine success.

     

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    Friday, August 13, 2010 6:39 AM
  • Ok, I will help you
    Thursday, November 22, 2012 7:00 AM